UAF Journalism - Tell Great Stories
  • Snedden Chair Julia Duin provides a free public lecture in UAF's Murie Auditorium.

    Snedden Chair Julia Duin provides a free public lecture in UAF's Murie Auditorium.

  • FIELD TEST--  Former Snedden Chair Richard Murphy portrays '97 mugging victim as students weigh Hartman murder testimony. Anne Bartholomew photo

    FIELD TEST-- Former Snedden Chair Richard Murphy portrays '97 mugging victim as students weigh Hartman murder testimony. Anne Bartholomew photo

  • FIELD HQ BRIEFING--News Writing student Ruby Walden questions Capt. David Provencher, of the 1-24th Infantry Regiment, about upcoming fall 2014 exercises at Fort Wainwright.

    FIELD HQ BRIEFING--News Writing student Ruby Walden questions Capt. David Provencher, of the 1-24th Infantry Regiment, about upcoming fall 2014 exercises at Fort Wainwright.

  • Snedden Chair Julia Duin discusses her work during a meet and greet with UAF students.

    Snedden Chair Julia Duin discusses her work during a meet and greet with UAF students.

  • Former Snedden Chair Richard Murphy discusses his work during a recent free Snedden Lecture at UAF's Murie Auditorium.

    Former Snedden Chair Richard Murphy discusses his work during a recent free Snedden Lecture at UAF's Murie Auditorium.

  • Multimedia journalist Mark Trahant, UAA's current Atwood chair, left UAF TV Reporting students Monica Combs and Aaron Berner encouraged about marketing online video packages.

    Multimedia journalist Mark Trahant, UAA's current Atwood chair, left UAF TV Reporting students Monica Combs and Aaron Berner encouraged about marketing online video packages.

  • Kyle Evans is working hard at his internship with KIAK-FM.

    Kyle Evans is working hard at his internship with KIAK-FM.

  • MISSION PREP--Capt. Dave Provencher, of the 1-24th Infantry command staff, walks News Writing students through a scale map of exercises involving his regiment and other units of Fort Wainwright's 1-25 Stryker Brigade.

    MISSION PREP--Capt. Dave Provencher, of the 1-24th Infantry command staff, walks News Writing students through a scale map of exercises involving his regiment and other units of Fort Wainwright's 1-25 Stryker Brigade.

  • Journalism students Lindsey Von Borstel, Sophia Holton and John Hall field reporting at -20F.

    Journalism students Lindsey Von Borstel, Sophia Holton and John Hall field reporting at -20F.

  • ELECTION NIGHT--Assemblymen John Davies fields questions from News Writing students.

    ELECTION NIGHT--Assemblymen John Davies fields questions from News Writing students.

Unleash your curiosity.

Journalists explore issues, find answers, investigate mysteries, inform the public, expose wrongdoing and record history. We do it by telling stories.

At UAF Journalism, we teach the skills you need to succeed, whether in a newsroom or a boardroom. You’ll learn to question the status quo, research important issues, write stories that change lives, make photographs that capture the human spirit and shoot and edit video that illuminates the world around us. And instead of sitting in a classroom listening to endless lectures, you’ll learn these skills by actually doing them.

As the media industry continues an era of unprecedented change, UAF is committed to training the next generation of multimedia journalists. With a journalism degree from UAF, you’ll be ready to not only thrive in today’s media landscape, but also to help shape it. Our program combines a solid liberal arts education with a curriculum that focuses on skills rather than the latest software platform. Our graduates have gone on to become newspaper reporters, digital media producers, television news anchors and award-winning photographers.

With an excellent faculty to student ratio, you’ll get personal attention from professors who are also working journalists. Small classes and access to the latest equipment — from HD video cameras to digital voice recorders to flyable drones equipped with GoPro cameras — mean you’ll enjoy hands-on experience collecting and telling stories that truly impact people’s lives.

While you’re enrolled in UAF’s journalism program, you’ll contribute to the program’s award-winning website, Extreme Alaska. You may see your photographs and stories in print in The Sun Star, the student newspaper. You’ll host an opening of your own photography show. You may hear your stories on the student radio station, KSUA, or on the local public radio station, KUAC, both located on campus. You’ll also complete an internship with an established media outlet.

As a student of UAF Journalism, you’ll know the satisfaction of a job well done, feel the adrenaline rush of completing a story on deadline and enjoy the delicious sense that what you do every day really counts. So unleash your curiosity and join us.

UAF Journalism: Tell Great Stories.

UAF Journalism Mission Statement

Our mission is to prepare versatile journalists who are ably suited to enhance the profession in Alaska and elsewhere.   The Department is committed to the development of professional skills, critical thinking and journalistic ethics.

Dark Winter Nights: True Stories from Alaska

A Fairbanks Storytelling Event

Don't miss the second DWN live event coming up later on this month. Professor of Documentary Filmmaking, Robert Prince, will be hosting this free public event that invites Alaskans to tell their OWN stories - live. 

Dark Winter Nights: True Stories from Alaska

November 22nd, 8-10pm

Pioneer Park Civic Center Theatre

Dark Winter Nights is not only a live event but is also a radio show on KUAC and routine podcast - subscribe to DWN Podcast here.

Snedden Chair for Academic Year 2014-2015: Julia Duin

Julia Duin, UAF’s ninth visiting Snedden Chair of Journalism, describes herself as a “military brat,” whose first introduction to the state came as the daughter of a U.S. Coast Guard officer.

She earned her BA in English from Lewis & Clark College in Portland, Ore., in 1978, the same year her father became the Coast Guard admiral over all of Alaska.
 
Duin began her career in journalism covering police and municipalities for small newspapers in Oregon and South Florida. In 1986, she landed a job with the Houston Chronicle as a full-time religion writer. She received a MA in religion at a seminary in western Pennsylvania in 1992. She then worked as a city editor for the Daily Times in Farmington NM before moving to Washington DC in 1995 to be an assistant national editor with the Washington Times.

Duin spent more than 14 years with the Times and published several books, including Quitting Church: Why the Faithful are Fleeing and What to Do About It and Days of Fire and Glory: The Rise and Fall of a Charismatic Community.

Duin has won numerous awards for her work, which spans everything from a five-part series on America’s clergy to "female feticide" (gender-selective abortions) in India.

Other notable assignments include reporting on Kurds in northern Iraq and the 2005 election of Pope Benedict.
 
In recent years she has written extensively for the Washington Post Sunday magazine and Style section,
as well as the Economist, CNN.com and the Wall Street Journal. Her latest book project involves 20-something Pentecostal serpent handlers in Appalachia who use Facebook to spread their beliefs. In December, she expects to receive a second MA (in journalism) with the University of Memphis.

The 2014-15 Snedden Chair relocated to Alaska from Tennessee with her 9-year-old daughter, Olivia Veronika.

The Chair and associated Snedden Lecture series brings distinguished journalists to campus for visits as short as three days on up to Duin’s year-long faculty appointment within UAF’s College of Liberal Arts.

The program was funded through a generous $2.6 million endowment established by the late Helen Snedden. That gift, honoring the legacy of her husband, longtime News-Miner Publisher C.W. Snedden, has enlivened classrooms and community forums with perspectives of more than a dozen Pulitzer Prize-winning reporters, photographers and editors since 2005.
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