CENTENNIAL EVENTS ARCHIVE

March 2017

March 6

Stargazing Night: Northern Dene (Athabascan) Astronomy
Chris Cannon
6:30 p.m., meet in Room 202 Reichardt Building
The Alaska Gwich'in constellation “yahdii” spans nearly the entire sky and comprises 16 groups of stars named after body parts. Yahdii and similar constellations in other Northern Dene languages across the Arctic are incorporated into systems of wayfinding, time reckoning, weather forecasting, and cosmology and religion. Join Chris Cannon, UAF doctoral student in cultural anthropology, for a presentation and star walk to learn more about the Northern Dene sky. Come dressed for the weather.

For more information, please contact Carolyn.

Starry sky
Starry sky
Photos courtesy of Chris Cannon.

March 2-4

Festival of Native Arts
The Festival of Native Arts provides cultural education and sharing through Native dance, music and traditional arts. The festival continues the UAF student-led tradition that began in 1973 of bringing together artists, performers and performance groups in a celebration of Native cultures.

Festival drummer

March 2

Centennial lecture by Lawrence Krauss 
7 p.m., West Valley High School Theater

Krauss, a physicist and science communicator, will present "Hidden Realities: The Greatest Story Ever Told … So Far." Krauss directs the Origins Project at Arizona State University and is a leading researcher in particle astrophysics and cosmology. He has written several best-selling books, including "The Physics of Star Trek." The event is presented by the UAF Society of Physics Students.

February 2017

Feb. 23

Snedden lecture by Dorothy Parvaz
6:30 p.m., Murie Building auditorium
Parvaz, a former Seattle newspaper reporter now with Al Jazeera America, will present "On the Run: Covering the Global Refugee Crisis." After entering Syria to cover protests in 2011, Parvaz was questioned and deported to Iran, her birth country, where interrogations continued. In all, she was held almost three weeks. Her lecture, organized by the Department of Communication and Journalism, is funded by the late Helen Snedden's endowment honoring her late husband, C.W. Snedden, former Fairbanks Daily News-Miner owner and publisher.


Feb. 18

Hands-on History of Sourdough
9 a.m., Room 201 Reichardt Building

Connect to chemistry, biology and Alaska history through the age-old tradition of sourdough. Workshop participants will learn to make and care for their own sourdough starter from retired UAF nutrition educator Marsha Munsell. Participants will receive sourdough starter passed down from the late Lola Tilly, home economics professor from 1929 to 1963.

sourdough starter
"Ferment after four days" by Jim Champion is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Feb. 11

Blue and Gold Gala
6 p.m., Carlson Center
Join us for an elegant evening with fine dining and live music by Pamyua, celebrating UAF's first 100 years and our distinguished honorees.

January 2017

Jan. 31

'The Almost Forgotten Earthquake'
Assistant Professor Carl Tape, UAF
7 p.m., Raven Landing
On Aug. 27, 1904, seismic stations from around the globe recorded a magnitude 7.3 earthquake in central Alaska. Tape shares new insights at this kick-off event in the Science for Alaska lecture series.

Dec. 31, 2016 - New Year's Eve Centennial Kick-Off Video

Happy New Year to you and happy centennial to us!

All of us at the University of Alaska Fairbanks wish you the best for 2017!

July 6, 2015 - Rededicating the cornerstone

Hundreds of people, including state, university and community leaders, joined University of Alaska Fairbanks Chancellor Brian Rogers on July 6 to conduct a blessing at Troth Yeddha' Park, future home of an indigenous studies center, and to rededicate our cornerstone on the centennial of its establishment in 1915. The events commemorated UAF's rich history and welcomed our next 100 years.

Size:á3.5Mábytes Modified: 14 September 2016, 07:58

Photos

 

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History cast in stone

Imagine an object that has lasted a hundred years. A big object, made of stone. Too heavy to move by hand, it's weathered and worn. Bits of its facade have crumbled away. The metal surface of its plaque has rusted and discolored.

Certainly this item has a story, or many, to tell. More...

 
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