Courses

The UAF Bristol Bay Campus offers numerous sustainable energy-related courses. Some of them are available on-line. Occasionally, there are scholarships available to fund student tuition and travel. We are also constantly investigating ideas for new course offerings based on community interest and demand. If you're interested in registering for a course please contact us today! Here is a list of our courses (click a course to learn more):

Typical Fall Course Offering

Instructor: Dr. Tom Marsik, Assistant Professor of Sustainable Energy

Credits: 1

Basics of space heating and electricity use and production for Alaskan homes. Main topics include fundamentals of physics related to home energy, lighting and appliances, energy bills, building science, retrofits, home renewable energy systems. Course emphasizes how to decrease fossil fuel consumption of homes.

Delivery: Distance (online)

Instructor: Dr. Tom Marsik, Assistant Professor of Sustainable Energy

Credits: 3

Introduction to societal problems and solutions related to its energy use and production. Problems discussed are mainly related to the extent of sustainability of current energy practices. Solutions discussed cover both energy efficiency and renewable energy.

Delivery: Distance (online)

Typical Summer Course Offering

Instructor: Kent Winship

Credits: 3

Basic construction techniques using OSHA approved standards by stressing how to follow safe work practices and procedures, how to safely use hand and power tools, how to extract information from construction blueprints and drawings, good housekeeping habits, and material handling on the construction site. This course is divided into six modules. Each module must be successfully completed. May be repeated twice for credit. (Alternative: CTT F101; CTT F102; CTT F103; CTT F104.)

Instructor: Dr. Tom Marsik, Assistant Professor of Sustainable Energy

Credits: 3

Introduction to basic mathematical procedures commonly used in the construction and maintenance crafts. Includes multiplication, subtraction, addition, division, working with fractions and measuring areas, volume and capacity of shapes.

Instructor: Kent Winship

Credits: 2.5

Examines the sources and uses of various softwoods and hardwoods, the grading system for lumber and plywood, composition and uses of various engineered sheet materials and laminated lumber products and the many kinds of fasteners and adhesives used with wood and masonry construction. Expands on the hand and power tool information provided in the construction technology core and introduces the carpentry trainee to additional tools used in the carpentry trade. (Alternative to CTT F110 when taken with CTT F112; CTT F113; CTT F114.)

Instructor: Kent Winship

Credits: 2

Focuses on framing basics. Includes the procedures for laying out and constructing a wood floor using common lumber as well as engineered building materials, procedures for laying out and framing walls and ceilings, roughing in doors and window openings, construction corners and partition Ts, bracing walls and ceilings, and applying sheathing. (Alternative to CTT F110 when taken with CTT F111; CTT F113; CTT F114.)

Instructor: Kent Winship

Credits: 2

Describes the various kinds of roofs and instructions for laying out rafters for gable roof, hip roof and valley intersections. Includes both stick built and truss built roofs, various types of windows, skylights, exterior doors, and instructions for installing weather stripping and lock sets. (Alternative to CTT F110 when taken with CTT F111; CTT F112; CTT F114.)

Instructor: Kent Winship

Credits: 2

Introduction to various cements and other materials which when mixed form various types of concrete. Includes concrete volume estimates, concrete tests, concrete curing methods, reinforcement materials such as rebar, bar supports and welded-wire fabric and tasks in the construction of foundations and flat work. (Alternative to CTT F110 when taken with CTT F111; CTT F112; CTT F113.)

Typical Spring Course Offering

Instructor: Dr. Tom Marsik, Assistant Professor of Sustainable Energy

Credits: 4

Exploring the concept of energy. Investigation of the sources, conversion, distribution and ultimate dispersion of energy, as well as the consequences of its use in the development and maintenance of modern society. May be used to fulfill part of the natural science requirement. Designed for non-science majors.

Delivery: Distance (online)

Instructor: Dr. Tom Marsik, Assistant Professor of Sustainable Energy

Credits: 1

In this course, students gain basic practical knowledge related to the process of designing energy efficient buildings, as applied to both new construction and retrofits. Main topics covered include basic building science, principles and techniques of energy efficient construction, and building energy simulations.

Delivery: Distance (online)

Instructor: Dr. Tom Marsik, Assistant Professor of Sustainable Energy

Credits: 1

Basics of indoor air quality and its relationship to ventilation and energy use in buildings. Main topics include types of indoor air pollutants; basic science related to moisture, condensation, and mold; and heat recovery ventilation. The course emphasizes practical ways of how homeowners can maintain healthy indoor air while keeping their energy bill low.

Delivery: Face to Face

Other Courses

Offered: TBA

Instructor: Dr. Tom Marsik, Assistant Professor of Sustainable Energy

Delivery Method: Face-to-Face (Dillingham)

In this course, students gain practical knowledge of designing and installing residential-scale solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. Main topics include basic physics related to solar energy, ways of harvesting solar energy, sizing a PV system, energy storage vs. grid-tie, system components, installation techniques, and PV safety.

Syllabus

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Offered: TBA

Instructor: Dr. Paul Cotter, Adjunct Instructor

Delivery method: Face-to-Face (Dillingham)

Students gain practical knowledge of building and/or retrofitting cold climate homes. Topics covered include basic building science, material selection, building diagnostics, building efficiency stategies, project design and building performance modeling.

Taught in conjunction with Alaska Building Science Network (ABSN)

Syllabus

Offered: TBA

Instructor: Dr. Paul Cotter, Adjunct Instructor

Delivery method: Face-to-Face (Dillingham)

This course provides theory and practice of blower door testing of single and multi-family dwellings. Topics include: required equipment, equipment setup and operation, building setup, basic blower door testing, zonal pressure measurement, building tightness limit determination, ventilation requirements, combustion zone safety, worse-case scenario testing and applications for weatherization of small buildings. This is a "hands-on" course where students participate in all portions.

Taught in conjunction with Alaska Building Science Network (ABSN) and Bristol Bay Housing Association (BBHA).

Syllabus

Offered: Spring 2011

Instructor: Kat Keith, Adjunct Faculty-Instructor (UAA), Kirk Garroute, Susitna Energy Systems,Inc.

Delivery method: Face-to-face (Dillingham)

This course is designed to provide training and work experience as well as applied academic training in wind energy. It will broaden the student’s knowledge in basic wind energy theory, implementation, and project development. Students will participate in the maintenance and installation of a Skystream 3.7 wind turbine.

Offered: Fall 2009,2010

Instructor: Dr. Paul Cotter

Delivery method: Face-to-face (Dillingham)

In this course, students gain practical knowledge related to decreasing the fossil fuel consumption of Alaskan homes via weatherization. Main topics covered include basic building science, insulation, heating, ventilation and indoor air quality, retrofitting, and state and federal programs for the homeowner.

2011 syllabus

Offered: Fall 2009

Instructors: Dr. Todd Radenbaugh, Asst. Professor of Environmental Studies and Michael Golub

Delivery method: Face-to-Face (Dillingham)

An introduction to the principles of electrical vehicle propulsion systems. Fundamentals of electrical motors, electrical motor controls, electrical energy storage systems, and automotive power-train design. The student will conduct practical design projects culminating with a complete electric car conversion. Relevant codes and standards will be emphasized.

2009 syllabus

Offered: 2009

Instructor: Will Taygan, Arctic Vegworks/Adjunct Instructor

Delivery method: Face-to-Face (Dillingham)

This course will provide students with the knowledge to design straight vegetable/fish oil (SVO) fuel systems and biodiesel processing techniques. Students will learn safe chemistry techniques and will make their own small batches of biodiesel. In addition, we will study the state of biodiesel in Alaska, look at which diesels work on vegetable/fish oil the best, explore the science behind biodiesel and SVO systems, compare emissions, learn how to collect oil responsibly, and discuss storage requirements. We will investigate the different types of processors and SVO systems available and will develop plans for local implementation of biodiesel/SVO systems.

Syllabus

Instructor: Gorden Isaacs, Certified Residential Energy Auditor

Delivery method: Face-to-Face (Dillingham)

In this course, students will be guided through the ‘whole systems’ approach in evaluating and improving the energy efficiency of homes. Besides discussing and demonstrating the energy audit process based on the Alaska Housing Finance Corporation (AHFC) rating methodology currently used by Certified Energy Raters in Alaska, the course will also cover basic principles of building science including energy efficiency, moisture issues, and ventilation concerns.

2011 syllabus

Offered: Fall 2009

Instructor: Dr, Tom Marsik, Asst. Professor of Sustainable Energy

Delivery method: Face-to-face (Dillingham)

This course introduces many topics related to the Bristol Bay region energy problems and possible solutions. In a three day conference setting, students will attend presentations, participate in workshops and discussions, and network with individuals, businesses, and organizations involved in Bristol Bay energy issues.

2009 syllabus

Offered: Spiring 2009

Instructor: Scott Wood, Building Science Institute/Adjunct Instructor

Delivery method: Face-to-Face (Dillingham)

This three-and-a-half day course covers the application of infrared thermography as a powerful and non-invasive means of monitoring and diagnosing the condition of buildings. This course provides an intensive level of theory of the use of infrared thermography in building inspections. The lecture will include: thermal science concepts, introduction to building science, building, codes, design, envelope barriers, exteriors, and assessments, safety during investigations, water testing, water restoration and reporting the results.