Courses Offered

Spring 2021 Courses

Courses are offered at the Fairbanks campus unless otherwise noted.

CRN Course Title Days Time
36235

ANL F108

Beginning Athabascan Literacy

M

5:40-6:40
34668

ANL F142X 

Beginning Dene/ Athabascan II 

MWF
TR

4-5pm
4-5pm
36789

ANL F150

Interpretive Communication

*Distance Course

T 10-11pm
36789

ANL F288

Curriculum and Materials Development for Alaska Native Languages

R 5:20-6:50
32817

ANL F401

Alaska Native Language Apprenticeship

MTWRF 8-9am
32818 

ANL F402

Alaska Native Language Apprenticeship II

   
32819

ANL F698

Non-thesis Research/Project

   
36236

ANL F315

AK Native Lang: Eskimo-Aleut

W 3-6pm
36183 INU F111X 

Elementary Inupiaq Eskimo I 

 

Distance Education

33420 INU F112

Elementary Inupiaq II                                  *Web (internet)

TR   MW

2-3:30pm 2:15-3:15

33914

YUP F102X 

Elementary Central  Yup'ik II

MWF TR

11:45-12:45pm
11:30-12:30pm
36151 YUP F202 

Intermediate Central Yup'ik II

MWF 1-2pm
33916 YUP F415  Additional Topics in Advanced Yup'ik MWF 2:15-3:15pm
36154 INU F112x 

Elementary Inupiaq II

*Distance course

TR           F

5:10 6:40  5-7pm

 

35547 INU F115 

Conversational Inupiaq I             

*Distance course

TR 6:50-8:20
36155 INU F116

Conversational Inupiaq II

*Distance Course

MW 5:10-6:40
36150

YUP F104

Conversational Central Yup'ik II

*Distance Course

TR 

5:10-6:40
36151 YUP F130

Beginning Yup'ik Grammar 

*Distance course

TR

 

11-12:30

ANLC Offerings

Introduction to Gwich’in Athabascan, spoken in the northeastern Alaska villages of Arctic Village, Venetie, Fort Yukon, Chalkyitsik, Circle, and Birch Creek, as well as in a wide adjacent area of the Northwest Territories and Yukon Territory. 

Communication processes in Yup'ik and English speaking cultures. Solutions to identify problem areas in cross-cultural communication. Situations such as conversations, meetings, translating and interpreting. Interpreting meaning in what is communicated between people of different sociocultural backgrounds. Kuskokwim Campus only.

Continuation of beginning Athabascan-Gwich'in. Development of conversational ability, additional grammar and vocabulary.  

Continuation of Intermediate Dene / Athabascan I. Class will deal with one of the eleven Dene / Athabascan language spoken in Alaska. Literacy and grammatical analysis for speakers. Development of conversational ability, additional grammar and vocabulary.

Intro to the linguistic structure of the Athabascan family of languages, drawing on examples from the Athabascan languages of Alaska.  Writing systems, word structure, texts and language relationships.  Techniques for accessing linguistic reference materials and the role of linguistic documentation in language revitalization and language learning. 

Methodology approaches and practice in teaching Native language and literacy to both speakers and non-speakers. Prerquisites:  Knowledge of a Native Language.  

Structured study of an Alaska Native Language.  Select and work intensively with a mentor (native speaker of selected language).  Choice of mentor requires faculty approval.  Meet regularly with mentor (minimum 10 hours per week) and participate in regular training sessions tow ork toward fluency.  Graded Pass/Fail.  

Introduction to Inupiaq, the language of the Unalakleet, Seward Peninsula, Kotzebue Sound and the North Slope.  

Continuation of INU F111X. Introduction to Inupiaq, the language of Unalakleet, Seward Peninsula, Kotzebue Sound and North Slope. Open to both speakers and nonspeakers. For speakers the course provides literacy and grammatical analysis. For others it provides a framework for learning to speak, read and write the language. Consideration given to dialect differences.

Continuation of INU F111 and INU F112, concentrating on development of conversational ability, with presentation of additional grammar and vocabulary. Prerequisites: INU F112.

Continuation of INU F211, concentrating on development of conversational ability, with presentation of additional grammar and vocabulary.

Introduction to Central Yup'ik, the language of the Yukon and Kuskokwim deltas and Bristol Bay.

Continued introduction to Central Yup'ik, the language of the Yukon and Kuskokwim deltas and Bristol Bay. Open to both speakers and nonspeakers. For speakers the course provides literacy and grammatical analysis. For others, it provides a framework for learning to speak, read and write the language. Consideration given to dialect differences.

Continuation of YUP F101 and YUP F102. Increasing emphasis on speaking, reading and writing. Prerequisites: YUP F102 or permission of instructor.

Continuation of YUP F201. Increasing emphasis on speaking, reading and writing.

Continuation of YUP F201 and F202. Completes the basic study of the Central Yup'ik grammar. Prerequisites: YUP F101; YUP F102; YUP F201;YUP F202; or permission of instructor.

Further study of Yup'ik linguistics. Includes text transcription, editing, analysis and discussion. Yup'ik dialectology. Study of related Eskimo languages from the standpoint of Central Yup'ik. Additional topics to be studied depending upon the interests of the students and the instructor.