Advisory Council

Anna Atchison

Anna Atchison, community and government relations manager at Fort Knox Mine, was raised on a homestead at the base of the Talkeetna Mountains. She has worked in campaign management and public policy, for the Greater Fairbanks Chamber of Commerce, the Catholic Diocese and Tanana Valley Clinic. “I finally wound up where I wanted to be, in mining,” she said. “I couldn’t be happier.”  She loves Fairbanks and UAF and wants to see SNRE succeed. She is a SNRE alumna.

Christi Bell

Christi Bell, director UA Center for Economic Development, said when considering graduate schools SNRE stood out. "There are incredible opportunities here," she said. “It was the perfect time to do something that will make a difference by serving on this council. I always had a love for this program. It is preparing thought leadership for tomorrow." She is a SNRE alumna.

Craig Fleener

Craig Fleener served as deputy commissioner of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game and is now a candidate for political office. He hails from Fort Yukon and now lives in Anchorage. He has 27 years of military service and worked for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game for five years. "This is my alma mater. I have faith in this school and believe in it," he said. "When I see faculty it is like seeing family." He is a SNRE alumnus.

Roberta Graham

Roberta Graham, assistant commissioner of the Alaska Department of Commerce, Community and Economic Development,  s fascinated with the school and station's work on peonies. "If I had a green thumb I'd be a peony grower," she said. On the economic side, she called the peony industry in Alaska "crazy good." She is working on an interdisciplinary Ph.D. in arctic governments and public diplomacy. She is also very interested in the school's Peace Corps programs.

Maggie Hess

Maggie Hess

Maggie Hess, Environmental Impact Analyst for the Alaska Department of Transportation & Public Facilities, is a SNRE alumna who has worked in  wildland fire and forestry for state and federal agencies for 12 years. As a student, she learned to think strategically - a quality of the program that she hopes students and leaders continue to embrace. "I don't want that to go away," she said. During her time with SNRE she made many meaningful connections both on a personal and professional level. While on the school's NRM 290 field trip in 2002, she met four people from Norway who became lifelong friends. She visited with them in Norway in October 2013.

Glenn Juday

Glenn Juday

Glenn Juday, professor of forest ecology, represents the SNRE/AFES faculty on the council. His research is focused on the relationship of tree growth to environmental factors, including long-term climate change, sustainable production of boreal forest products (especially wood biomass energy) and the natural and management controls of biodiversity. He teaches tree ring analysis, wilderness management and conservation biology. He is part owner of a family farm and serves on the University Advisory Board to the Energy Council.


Stephen Sparrow

Stephen Sparrow

Stephen Sparrow is the SNRE/AFES interim dean and director. Prior to becoming head of the school and station, he researched the long-term effects of tillage, forage crop management and bio-energy crops, along with soil management. He also taught several natural resources management courses until   he became interim dean and director in October 2012.

Nancy Tarnai

Nancy Tarnai

Nancy Tarnai, SNRE/AFES public information officer, is the staff representative on the council. She works to spread the good word about SNRE/AFES through newspaper articles, the SNRE blog, social media and publications. She also coordinates media relations, assists with event planning and helps the faculty get speaking engagements. She believes in the school’s mission and enjoys the camaraderie amongst the faculty, staff and students.

Bryce Wrigley

Bryce Wrigley is owner of Alaska Flour Co., president the Alaska Farm Bureau and district manager for Salcha-Delta Soil and Water Conservation District. His interest in the school is focused on agricultural research and food security for Alaska. "If you want food security you have to have agricultural production," he said. "There is a tremendous need for research in the Arctic. I see nothing new on the horizon. The circumpolar regions could share information to improve and enhance the situation." He decided to serve on the council because "if you're not willing to get involved there is no reason to complain about it."

Back to Top