Natural Resources and Sustainability

Resource Policy and Sustainability Science

NRM 601 (3 credits) Fall: Research Methods in Natural Resources Management

Introduction for graduate students to the research methods as employed in the various fields of resource management, including agriculture, forestry, ecology and social sciences. Designed to acquaint students with the relationship between theory and research, the nature of scientific inquiry, the approaches to research, the sequence of steps involved in scientific investigation and the presentation of research results.

BIOL 602 (3 credits) Fall: Research Design

An introduction to the philosophy, performance, and evaluation of hypothetical/deductive research in the natural sciences, with emphasis on hypothesis formulation and testing.   Each student will develop a research proposal.

NRM 630 (3 Credits) Fall: Resource Management Planning

Application of planning and conflict resolution principles to natural resources management. Examines plans prepared in response to current Alaska resource disputes, including wolf, brown bear, boreal forest and recreation river plans. Includes public involvement, consensus building, the basic steps in the planning process, and resource dispute simulations.

NRM 631 (3 Credits) ADW: Resource Planning Practicum

Application of principles and processes through group projects focused on Alaska land or resource problems.

NRM 632 (3 credits) Spring: Literature of Science and the Environment

Reading , analysis and discussion of classic and contemporary works in science, natural history and environmental literature. Some semesters all of the readings will follow one theme; other semesters a variety of fiction, poetry, oral tradition and nonfiction will be considered. Readings are selected from a spectrum of opinion on the relationship of people to the natural world and both analytical and creative writing are required.

NRM/ECON 637 (3 Credits) Spring: Natural Resource Policy

Resource policy issues development and implementation including forestry, mining, fisheries, oil, wildlife and other topics as demand warrants. Focus on policy issues involved in management of Alaska 's resources.

NRM 640 (3 credits) Spring: Simulation and Modeling in Natural Resource Management

Introduction to and discussion of the use of simulation and modeling in natural resource management. Emphasis on concepts, strategies and case studies

NRM 648 (3 credits) Spring: Integrative Modeling of Natural and Social Systems.

Provides a modeling approach to structuring knowledge from natural and social scientific disciplines so that relevant aspects of a complex societal problem are considered for the purpose of making management and policy decisions. Designed to help graduate students use models to integrate understanding about interactions among natural and social systems for the purpose of managing biological and human resources. (Prerequisite: STAT 200 or equivalent, graduate standing in a natural science, social science, humanities or interdisciplinary program at UAF or another university, or permission of instructor. The course is designed to fit into the sequence of the Resilience and Adaptation program's core courses. It is open to other graduate students interested in and prepared to conduct interdisciplinary studies relating to regional sustainability.

NRM 663 (3 credits) Fall: Wilderness Concepts

Discovery of wilderness concepts, including the history and evolution of wilderness thought, the contemporary meaning of wilderness, and survey of economic and noneconomic wilderness values for individuals and society.

NRM 665 (3 credits) Fall: A dvanced Outdoor Recreation

Evaluation of contemporary outdoor recreation management models and the linkage between management programming and visitor response. Development of a synthesized model and testing with contemporary problems.

NRM 681 (3 Credits) Fall:   Natural Area Protection and Management

An examination of the emergence of programs to identify, protect and maintain natural diversity and natural areas as a major factor in public and private resource management in the U.S. and Canada. Topics will include conservation biology principles, evolution and operating principles of natural area programs, natural area data management, natural area system administration.

NRM 693 (3credits) Alt Spring: Legal Topics in Natural Resources Law

Introduction to legal concepts and legal research techniques using the context of the Endangered Species Act as a framework. The goals of the course are to gain a basic understanding of how to find and use the law to better understand major legal themes that shape natural resource issues .

NORS 647 (3 Credits) Spring: U.S. Environmental Politics

Explores the basic principles that govern resilience and change of ecological and social systems. The principles are applied at the level of populations, communities, regions and the globe. Working within and across each of these scales, students address the processes that influence ecological, cultural and economic sustainability, with an emphasis on Alaska examples.

NORS 648/PS488 (3 Credits) Fall: Environmental Politics of the Circumpolar North

Overview of how environmental politics and policy as a field of study relates to the Arctic region. Analysis of various threats to the northern environment, focusing on the policy making institutions at selected Arctic rim nations, as well as strategies to deal with environmental problems in an international context.

NORS 654 (3 Credits) Spring: International Law and the Environment

International environmental law. International case law regulating the sea, airspace, outer space and the polar regions. Includes comprehensive international regulatory legal instruments to protect the environment (e.g. the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change), and the doctrines, principles and rules of international law that are basic to an understanding of international legal regimes and the environment.

NORS 655/PS 455 (3 Credits) Fall: Political Economy of the Global Environment

Exploration of the interactions between basic aspects of the global economy (international trade, investment and development) and the natural environment. Topics include the economic impact of global environmental agreements and the environmental impact of global markets, transnational corporations and development assistance by organizations such as the World Bank.

PS 454 (3 credits) Alternate Spring: International Law and the Environment

International environmental law. International case law regulating the sea, airspace, outer space and the polar regions. Includes comprehensive international regulatory legal instruments to protect the environment (e.g. the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change), and the doctrines, principles and rules of international law that are basic to an understanding of international legal regimes and the environment.

PS 458 (3 credits) Alternate Fall: Comparative Environmental Politics

Seminar with emphasis on enduring issues of the field of comparative politics and their relation to global environmental problems such as biodiversity, transboundary pollution and climate warming. Explores how state-society relations, political institutions, national political capacity, political processes and organizations, and international commitments potentially shape the nature and dynamics of global environmental politics and vise versa.