FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT:
	Sheri Layral
	312 Signers' Hall
	474-7964   FYSENAT

For Audioconferencing:  Bridge #:  1-877-751-8040
					(Passcode:  523297)
				Fairbanks:  474-8050
					(Chair's Passcode:  628337)

					A G E N D A
			UAF FACULTY SENATE MEETING #92
				Monday, February 7, 2000
				   1:30 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
				  Wood Center Ballroom

1:30	I	Call to Order - Larry Duffy   			  5 Min.
		A.	Roll Call
		B.	Approval of Minutes to Meeting #91
		C.	Adoption of Agenda

1:35	II	Status of Chancellor's Office Actions 		  5 Min.
		A.	Motions Approved:  
			1.	Motion to amend the policy on Approval of 
				Academic Changes. 
		B.	Motions Pending:  
			2.	Motion on University Honors Scholar. 
			3.	Motion that UAF Regulations shall apply in 
				the faculty review process.  
			4.	Motion to amend the policy on Dual Enrollment. 
			5.	Motion to approve an Accounting Technician 
				Certificate. 
			6.	Motion to approve the deletion of the M.A.T. 
				in Geology. 
			7.	Motion to approve an M.A. in Rural 
				Development.   (A request for a 90 day 
				extension was approved by the 
				Administrative Committee)
			8.	Motion to amend the Ph.D. requirements. 
			9. 	Motion on guidelines for Collaborative Ph.D. 
				Graduate Studies. 

1:40	III	A.	Remarks by Chancellor M. Lind   	10 Min.
		B.	Remarks by Provost P. Reichardt		  5 Min.

1:55	IV	Governance Reports
	A.	ASUAF -S. Banks / GSO - D. Moudry    		  5 Min.
	B.	Staff Council - I. Downes  			  5 Min.
	C.	President's Report - R. Gatterdam (Attachment 92/1)
	D.	President-Elections Report - L. Duffy   	  5 Min.
			1.	Mission Statements (Attachment 92/2)
			2.	Faculty Fellow (Attachment 92/3)
			3.	President-Elect nominations

2:10	V	Consent Agenda
	A.	Motion to approve the 2001-2002 Academic Calendar, 
		Submitted by Curricular Affairs (Attachment 92/4)

2:10	VI	New Business
	A.	Motion to approved the Unit Criteria for ANLC, 	  5 Min.
		submitted by the Ad Hoc Committee on Unit 
		Criteria (Attachment 92/5)

2:15	VII	Committee Reports 				20 Min.
	A.	Curricular Affairs - C. Basham (Attachment 92/6)
	B.	Faculty & Scholarly Affairs - N. Swazo (Attachment 92/7)
	C.	Graduate & Professional Curricular Affairs - J. Gardner
			(Attachment 92/8)
	D.	Core Review - J. Brown (Attachment 92/9)
	E.	Curriculum Review - S, Bandopadhyay
	F.	Developmental Studies - J. Weber (Attachment 92/10)
	G.	Faculty Appeals & Oversight - T. Maginnis
	H.	Faculty Development, Assessment & Improvement - 
			D. White (Attachment 92/11)
	I.	Graduate School Advisory Committee - L. Duffy
	J.	Legislative & Fiscal Affairs - 
	K.	Ad Hoc Committees 

2:35		***BREAK***					10 Min.

2:45	VIII	Discussion Items   				15 Min.
	A.	Presentation on the "Faculty Interaction Program" 
		by Allegra Banducci, Student Activities Assistant
	B.	Presentation on "Mentor a student! - UAF Job Shadow" 
		by Tonya Trabant, Career Services 

3:00	IX	Public Comments/Questions 			  5 Min.

3:05	X	Members' Comments/Questions			  5 Min.

3:10	XI	Adjournment


***************
ATTACHMENT 92/1
UAF FACULTY SENATE #90
FEBRUARY 7, 2000


President's Comments - Ron Gatterdam

Notes on the Information Resource (IR) policy

First let me dispose of the notion that the IR policy gives IR personnel the 
license to snoop in files on or being transmitted through UA computers.   
You need to understand that files on or passing through a network 
computer are about as private as a cell phone call.  That is, currently IR 
personnel can snoop if they so desire and there is no policy that prohibits 
it.  From that point of view, the IR policy strongly asserts privacy and 
restricts the conditions under which IR personnel can inspect a file and 
under which they can reveal its contents.

The policy itself is a compromise between the need to protect the IR 
resource, the University from legal liability, and the right and need of the 
user to privacy.  As a compromise, the IR personnel find they are too 
restricted and the users would like a stronger guarantee of privacy.  
Theyıre probably both right.  But I would argue that the policy is a good 
compromise.

I want to thank the Faculty & Scholarly Affairs Committee for input on the 
policy and assure them that even though their suggestions wonıt find 
their way into its final draft, nevertheless their voice has been heard.  
First, the Faculty & Scholarly Affairs Committee was silent on the sections 
that have been the most controversial ­ the conditions under which IR 
personnel can inspect files.  I take this to mean that consensus has been 
reached on that section.  Second, on the issue of property rights, the 
wording of Faculty & Scholarly Affairs Committee doesnıt really work 
(property rights are not a first amendment guarantee and are a matter of 
union contract).  But I have been assured that some language concerning 
property rights will be included in the regulations.  As to the requirement 
of prima fascia evidence before making suspect file material known, that 
was arguably too restrictive for on campus use but again will be 
considered for inclusion in the regulations as it pertains, for example, to 
law enforcement agencies.

Again, the Policy is a compromise.  As such it may not fit your model of 
ideal but compromises seldom do.  I submit that it is appropriate and 
workable.


***************
ATTACHMENT 92/2
UAF FACULTY SENATE #90
FEBRUARY 7, 2000
SUBMITTED BY ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE


MEMORANDUM

TO: 		UAF Deans, Directors, Faculty, Staff;
		Faculty Senate, Staff Council, ASUAF;
			& UAF Advisory Groups

FROM:	Marshall L. Lind, Chancellor
		University of Alaska Fairbanks

DATE:		January 28, 2000

RE:		UAF Mission Statement Revision Project

We are beginning the ambitious project of reviewing and possibly 
rewriting the UAF Mission Statement ­ and I would like you to be involved 
in the project. The existing UAF Mission Statement can be found on page 
6 of the 1999-2000 UAF Catalog or on the web at: 
http://www.uaf.edu/univrel/facts/mission.html. 

The four draft mission statements can be found at: 
http://www.uaf.edu/univrel/mission/.
I would like your input on the content of the draft mission statements as 
it applies to the University of Alaska Fairbanks.  It is expected that the 
Board of Regents will review the final revision draft in April 2000. This 
timeline is linked to UAFıs accreditation self-study.

I encourage you to look at mission statements of other higher educational 
institutions as well.

If you need a hard copy of the four mission statement drafts, contact 
Ann Secrest in my office at x7112 or via email at ann.secrest@uaf.edu.  
The deadline for submitting your proposed mission statement is Friday, 
February 18, 2000 at 5 p.m.  I encourage you to submit your proposed 
mission statement that best reflects the changing economic, cultural, and 
educational demands of a changing workforce. 

You can also submit your proposed statement via email or campus mail.  
Via email, submit to: fymissn@uaf.edu or ann.secrest@uaf.edu. 

Our expected timeline:
	February 18		Receive campus input
March 3	Distribute revised mission statement to the campus for 
second reading and comment
March 24	Receive all input on revised mission statement
	April 20/21 	Board of Regents review

Comments and revisions from the campus community should also include 
input from all governance groups and advisory councils.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact me at fychanc@uaf.edu. I 
look forward to working with the entire campus community on this 
exciting collaboration.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

MISSION STATEMENT REVISION

Message from Provost Paul B. Reichardt (December 17, 1999 
Cornerstone):

At the Dec. 6, 1999 Faculty Senate meeting, Chancellor Lind announced 
he is starting a process which will lead to a new mission statement for 
UAF by the end of this spring semester.  The present UAF Mission 
Statement was written in 1988, right after the system-wide restructuring 
which created the present UA system.  In the intervening years we have 
learned a lot about how this rather unique system of higher education 
works, and some things have changed dramatically.  While the dawning of 
the New Millennium provides an opportune time for revisiting our mission, 
initiation of the self-study for institutional accreditation provides an even 
more compelling reason for taking on this task at this time. 

As I studied the topic of mission statements, two principles stood out.  
First, modern mission statements are brief; they are meant to be 
statements which people can remember, at least in essence.  Second, a 
useful mission statement must be created by a process which engages 
the people who are most directly affected by the institution's mission.  
Chancellor Lind is devising a process to incorporate both principles, but it 
will only be successful if all of us get involved.  As you get ready for the 
holidays, Y2K and the spring semester, I encourage you to think about 
your view of UAF's mission and how you will become involved in the 
process which will result in a new formal statement of what UAF is all 
about.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

					Draft 1 

The historic cornerstone of higher education in the 49th state, the 
University of Alaska Fairbanks is committed to nurturing the spirit of 
independence and freedom that characterizes Alaska.  UAF was founded 
in 1917 as the Alaska Agricultural College and School of Mines on a ridge 
known to the local Athabaskans as Troth Yeddh.  As the last traditional 
land-grant college to be established in the country, UAF is the home of 
the UA administration.

Through its network of campuses, UAF responds to local, regional and 
rural educational and vocational needs and is committed to continual 
development of technology-based distance delivery of education.  The 
policy of open enrollment and early admission provides increased access 
to the university.

UAF encourage the life-long pursuit of intellectual and personal growth, 
and offers living and learning experiences supportive of all cultural 
heritages.  In particular, UAF values its special relationship with Alaskaıs 
native and rural people.

UAF offers a broad range of educational programs, including short-term 
vocational/technical certificates, and research-intensive masterıs and 
Ph.D. programs.  Through is baccalaureate core curriculum, UAF provides 
students with a solid foundation of knowledge and interpretive abilities 
with which to observe and accommodate the changing world.  UAF 
prepares teachers for Alaska and the nation.  UAF provides students with 
learning opportunities, both inside and outside the classroom, that take 
advantage of UAFıs geographic location and special facilities, such as 
advanced computing capabilities, for studying the environment and 
natural resources of the North.

UAF serves as a center for the arts and maintains vigorous programs in 
the liberal arts to provide an educational environment that celebrates 
diversity of the human spirit.  UAF promotes knowledge and appreciation 
of human history, though and culture.  Enhancements to program will 
further expand studentsı appreciation of the breadth and depth of the 
human experience.

As Alaskaıs land-, sea- and space-grant university and the major research 
center for Alaska, UAF is committed to extending research-based 
knowledge to the people of the state through the integration of teaching, 
research and public service.  Through basic and applied research UAF 
addresses emerging regional, national and international concerns 
andmakes lasting contributions to our understanding of the cultural, 
biological and physical characteristics of the North.

UAF continues to develop partnerships with the public and private 
sectors­within Alaska, through the United States and internationally­to 
find new ways of enriching the university experience.  UAF increasingly 
draws on the wisdom and support of this alumni and friends to promote 
its mission and plan for the future.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

					Draft 2 

The University of Alaska Fairbanks exists to benefit the people of the 
State of Alaska by providing a wide range of instruction, research and 
service.  It is the Land Grant, Sea Grant, and Space Grant University and 
the major research  center for the State.  Through distance delivery and 
branch campuses, UAF serves all of Alaska and places special emphasis on 
its relationship with Alaskaıs native and rural people.

A broad spectrum of instructional opportunities is available at UAF.  UAF 
provides vocational training, certificate programs, and associate degrees 
designed to meet specific State needs in addition to high quality degree 
programs at the baccalaureate, masters and doctoral level.  UAF degree 
programs are based on a solid background in the liberal arts and sciences.  
With particular strengths in the sciences and technology, student 
research is a major component of both undergraduate and graduate 
study.  Practical skills are emphasized through experiential learning and 
student internships with industries nation wide.  As a major cultural 
center for the State, UAF provides opportunities in fine and performance 
arts.  Studies in the liberal arts and social sciences place special emphasis 
on the heritage of Alaska.  It is the goal of UAF to provide the student 
with the educational opportunities of a major research campus while 
maintaining the intellectual community of a small school.

Research is critical to the UAF mission.  UAF is the home of a world-
recognized faculty and includes research institutes devoted to the study 
of geophysical, engineering and biological phenomenon.  Research at UAF 
is supported by a major supercomputer center.  In both the sciences and 
social sciences, special emphasis is placed on the study of the arctic and 
its peoples.  At UAF, research is the key component to understanding and 
education.

Through a wide range of outreach and extension programs, UAF provides 
specialized instruction, interprets and transfers research results, and 
provides service throughout Alaska.  UAF plays a major role in the 
economic development and well being of the State.

As an institution of research and higher education, the mission of the 
University of Alaska Fairbanks is to provide the resource needed to move 
Alaska and its people into an intellectually stimulating and economically 
sound future.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

					Draft 3 

UAF, Alaskaıs land, sea and space grant institution is a community of 
leaders and learners dedicated to advancing our State and its people 
through the pursuit and dissemination of knowledge, especially that 
knowledge which relates to living and working in the north.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

					Draft 4 

As Alaskaıs Land Grant, Sea Grant and Space Grant University, the 
University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) offers a wide range of instruction, 
research and service programs for the entire State.  However, UAF places 
special emphasis on its commitments to Interior Alaska, to its relationship 
with Alaskaıs rural and native people, to its role as the major research 
center for the State.  Although UAF possesses particular strengths in the 
sciences and technology, its instructional programs ­ from certificate 
through Ph.D. ­ are firmly rooted in the liberal arts and sciences.  
Experiential learning and the integration of research and teaching are 
important components of UAFıs effort to provide each student with the 
educational opportunities of a research campus while maintaining the 
intellectual community of a small school.  Through the coordination of 
programs in instruction, research and public outreach, UAF seeks to 
provide the resources needed to move Alaska and its people into an 
intellectually stimulating and economically sound future.


***************
ATTACHMENT 92/3
UAF FACULTY SENATE #90
FEBRUARY 7, 2000
SUBMITTED BY ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE


			ACADEMIC LIAISON FACULTY FELLOW
				CALL FOR NOMINATIONS

The Faculty Alliance and the President of the University are calling for 
nominations for the position of Faculty Fellow in the Office of the 
President for one year beginning July 1, 2000.

The Faculty Fellow will serve as the presidentıs academic advisor, which 
includes providing the president a view of academic issues and traditions, 
facilitating inter-MAU communication to faculty on systemwide academic 
issues, serving as ex-officio member of the Faculty Alliance, and serving 
as faculty liaison to the Systemwide Academic Council.
 
The Faculty Alliance will serve as the search committee and make 
recommendations to the President of the University. The President will 
select the candidate and offer the appointment.  If the appointment is 
accepted, the President will buy out the successful candidateıs contract 
for one year. The President will also provide on-campus housing for the 
duration.

Nominations may be made either by the applicant or by another faculty 
member or administrator within the university system.  Nomination 
packets should consist of a completed nomination form, a letter of 
nomination summarizing the nomineeıs abilities relative to the position 
and the universityıs strategic initiatives,  three references, and current 
curriculum vita.  

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION:  March 1, 1999

Nomination packets should be submitted to the nomineeıs local faculty 
governance leader as shown below.  

UAF - Ron Gatterdam, President		UAA - Lauren Bruce, President
	UAF Faculty Senate		UAA Faculty Senate
	P.O. Box 756660  			3211 Providence Drive, K205D
 	Fairbanks, Alaska  99775-6660	Anchorage, Alaska 99508
	907-474-6174 (business)		907-786-4394 (business)
	907-474-5394 (Fax)		907-786-4190 (Fax)
	ffrwg@aurora.uaf.edu			aflkb@uaa.alaska.edu
  		
UAS - Don Cecil, Chair
	Faculty Alliance and Chair,
	UAS Faculty Council
	11120 Glacier Highway
 	Juneau, Alaska 99801
	907-465-5387 (business)
 	907-465-6406 (Fax)
	Don.Cecil@uas.alaska.edu

Local faculty governance leaders will submit the nomination packets by 
March 10 to the Faculty Alliance through the Pat Ivey, System 
Governance office, P.O. Box 757780, 105H Butrovich Building, Fairbanks 
AK 99775-7780, phone 474-5130, fax 474-5131, 
snpmi@orca.alaska.edu.

January 21, 2000

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

			ACADEMIC LIAISON FACULTY FELLOW
				JOB DESCRIPTION


The establishment of an academic liaison faculty fellow in the presidentıs 
office would give the president a faculty voice in academic matters and 
the faculty a voice in administrative decision-making.

LENGTH OF CONTRACT:  One year beginning July 1.

DUTIES:

1.  	To serve as the presidentıs academic advisor, which includes 
providing the president a view of academic issues and traditions.  The 
Faculty Fellow will have no supervisory authority and will take on special 
projects as agreed to by both the Alliance and the president; these 
projects should be in line with the primary nature of this position.

2.  	To facilitate and improve inter-MAU communication with faculty on 
systemwide academic issues.

3.  	To serve as ex-officio member of the Faculty Alliance.

4.  	To serve as liaison to SAC.

SELECTION:

1.  	The Faculty Alliance selection committee will reflect gender equity.

2.	Whenever practical, the Faculty Fellow and the Chair of the Alliance 
shall be from different MAUs.

3.  	The Faculty Alliance selection committee will recommend to the 
president and SAC a minimum of two and not more than four faculty 
whom they fully support for the position.

4.  	To the extent possible, an effort will be made to rotate the position 
among MAUs as well as bipartite and tripartite faculty and to maintain 
gender and racial equity.

5.  	The president will select the candidate and offer the appointment 
and, if the appointment is accepted, will buy out the successful 
candidate's contract for one year.


***************
ATTACHMENT 92/4
UAF FACULTY SENATE #90
FEBRUARY 7, 2000
SUBMITTED BY CURRICULAR AFFAIRS


MOTION:
======

The UAF Faculty Senate moves to approve the 2001-2002 Academic 
Calendar as presented by the Registrar prepared in accordance with 
Senate policy and Board of Regents' policies and forward it to the 
Governance Coordinating Committee for action. 

	EFFECTIVE:  	Immediately

	RATIONALE:  	The Curricular Affairs Committee has reviewed 
		the draft 2001-2001 Academic Calendar for compliance with 
		Senate policy and recommends approval of the calendar.  


				***************

					DRAFT
		UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA FAIRBANKS - Fairbanks Campus
			ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2001-2002
		Classes begin after Labor Day for Fall Semester and 
			after Civil Rights Day for Spring Semester.

FALL SEMESTER-2001

Registration and fee payment for the 2001 fall semester begins  
						Mon., Apr. 9, 2001
Application for admission deadline for fall semester	Wed., Aug. 1
Orientation for new students    		Sun.-Wed., Sept. 2-5
Labor Day (no registration or fee payment)		Mon., Sept. 3
Residence halls open, 9 am				Mon., Sept. 3
First day of instruction					Thurs., Sept 6
Late registration begins   				Thurs., Sept 6
Late registration and fee payment end	Fri., Sept. 14
Last day for 100% refund of tuition and materials fees	Fri., Sept. 14
Last day for student-initiated and faculty-initiated drops
	(course does not appear on academic record)	Fri., Sept. 21
Last day for 50% refund of tuition (only)		Fri., Sept. 21
Low grade reports for freshmen due not later than	Fri., Oct. 12
Last day to apply for 2001 fall graduation   		Mon., Oct. 15
Last day for student-initiated and faculty-initiated withdrawals 
 	(W grade given for course)			Fri., Nov. 2
Registration and fee payment for the 2002 spring semester begin
						Mon., Nov. 12
Thanksgiving holidays (no classes)			Thurs.-Sun., Nov. 22-25
Last day of instruction					Fri., Dec. 14
Final examinations  				Mon.-Thurs., Dec. 17-20
Residence halls close, noon				Fri., Dec. 21
Grades due to the Registrar's Office  			Fri., Dec. 21
Campus closed	5 p.m., Fri., Dec. 21, 2001 - 8 a.m., Wed., Jan 2. 2002

SPRING SEMESTER-2002

Application for admission deadline for spring semester
						Mon., Dec. 3, 2001
Orientation for new students		Tues.-Wed, Jan. 15-16, 2002
Residence halls open, 9 a.m.				Mon., Jan. 14
Alaska Civil Rights Day (registration and fee payment continue)
							Mon., Jan. 14
First day of instruction					Thurs., Jan. 17
Late registration begins   				Thurs., Jan. 17
Late registration and fee payment end		Fri., Jan. 25
Last day for 100% refund of tuition and material fees	Fri., Jan. 25
Last day for student-initiated and faculty-initiated drops
	(course does not appear on academic record)	Fri., Feb. 1
Last day for 50% refund of tuition (only)		Fri., Feb. 1
Last day to apply for 2002 spring graduation		Fri., Feb. 15
Low grade reports for freshmen due not later than	Fri., Feb. 22
Spring recess					Mon.-Sun., Mar. 11-17
Last day for student-initiated and faculty-initiated withdrawals 
	(W grade given for course)			Fri., Mar. 22
Registration and fee payment for the 2002 fall semester begin
							Mon., Apr. 8
All Campus Day (no classes)				Fri., Apr. 26
Last day of instruction					Fri., May 3
Final examinations 				Mon.-Thurs., May 6-9
Residence halls close, noon				Fri., May 10
Commencement**  					Sun., May 12
Grades due to the Registrar's Office  			Wed., May 15

**Saturday, May 11 may be an alternate date for Commencement (to 
coordinate with other MAU's).
Proposed by Ann Tremarello, January 25, 2000.


***************
ATTACHMENT 92/5
UAF FACULTY SENATE #90
FEBRUARY 7, 2000
SUBMITTED BY THE AD HOC COMMITTEE ON UNIT CRITERIA


MOTION:
======

The UAF Faculty Senate moves to approve the Unit Criteria for Alaska 
Native Language Center (ANLC).  


	EFFECTIVE:  	Immediately
			Upon Chancellor Approval

	RATIONALE:  	The committee assessed the unit criteria 
		submitted by Alaska Native Language Center (ANLC).  With 
		some minor changes, agreed upon by the department 
		representative, Larry Kaplan, the unit criteria were found 
		be consistent with UAF guidelines.


				***************


	   UAF REGULATIONS FOR THE EVALUATION OF FACULTY:
	INITIAL APPOINTMENT, ANNUAL REVIEW, REAPPOINTMENT,
	      PROMOTION, TENURE, AND SABBATICAL LEAVE

					   AND

			ALASKA NATIVE LANGUAGE CENTER 
				STANDARDS AND INDICIES


I.	PURVIEW

The University of Alaska Fairbanks document, "Faculty Appointment and 
Evaluation Policies" (hereinafter referred to as UAF Faculty Policies), 
supplements the Board of Regents policies and describes the purpose, 
conditions, eligibility, and other specifications relating to the evaluation 
of faculty at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Contained herein are 
regulations and procedures to guide the evaluation processes and to 
identify the bodies of review appropriate for UAF.

The University, through the UAF Faculty Senate, may wish to change or 
amend these regulations and procedures from time to time and will 
provide adequate notice in making changes and amendments.

The Provost is responsible for coordination and implementation of 
matters relating to procedures stated herein.


II.	INITIAL APPOINTMENT OF FACULTY

A.	Criteria for Initial Appointment.  Minimum degree, experience 
	and performance requirements are set forth in UAF Faculty 
	Policies, Chapter IV.  Exceptions to these requirements for 
	initial placement in academic rank or special academic rank 
	positions shall be submitted to the Chancellor or Chancellor's 
	designee for approval prior to a final selection decision.

B.	Academic Titles.  Academic titles must reflect the discipline 
	in which the faculty are appointed and reside within a specific 
	discipline.  Units wishing to appoint academic rank faculty 
	within schools and colleges to titles must have the 
	concurrence of the specific discipline in which the title 
	resides.

C.	Process for Appointment of Faculty with Academic Rank.  
	Deans of schools and colleges, and directors when appropriate, 
	in conjunction with the faculty in a unit shall establish 
	procedures for advertisement, review, and selection of 
	candidates to fill any faculty positions as they become 
	available.  Such procedures shall be consistent with the 
	University's affirmative action policies and shall provide 
	for participation in hiring by faculty and administrators 
	as a unit.

D.	Process for Appointment of Faculty with Special Academic 
	Rank.  Deans and/or directors, in conjunction with the faculty 
	in a unit, shall establish procedures for advertisement, review, 
	and selection of candidates to fill any faculty positions as they 
	become available.  Such procedures shall be consistent with the 
	University's stated affirmative action policies and shall provide 
	for participation in hiring by faculty and administrators in the 
	unit.  These procedures shall be on file in the Chancellor's 
	Office.

E.	Following the selection process, the dean or director shall 
	appoint the new faculty member and advise him/her of the 
	conditions, benefits, and obligations of the position.  If the 
	appointment is to be at the professor level, the dean/director 
	must first obtain the concurrence of the Chancellor or his/her 
	designee.

F.	Letter of Appointment.  The initial letter of appointment 
	shall specify the nature of the assignment, the percentage 
	emphasis that is to be placed on each of the parts of the 
	faculty responsibility, and any special conditions relating 
	to the appointment.

	This letter of appointment establishes the nature of the 
	position and, while the percentage of emphasis for each part 
	may vary with each workload distribution, the part(s) defining 
	the position may not.  Subsequent letters of appointment may 
	vary the work load distribution and nature of the assignment.


III.	PERIODIC EVALUATION OF FACULTY

A.	Criteria.  As outlined in UAF Faculty Policies, Chapter IV.A.3. 
	evaluators may consider, but shall not be limited to, whichever 
	of the following are appropriate to the faculty member's 
	professional obligation: mastery of subject matter; 
	effectiveness in teaching; achievement in research, scholarly, 
	and creative activity; effectiveness of public service; 
	effectiveness of university service; demonstration of 
	professional development and quality of total contribution 
	to the university.

	For purposes of evaluation at UAF, the total contribution 
	to the university and activity in the areas outlined above will 
	be defined by activity and excellence in the following tripartite 
	areas: l) effectiveness in teaching; 2) achievement in scholarly 
	activity; and 3) effectiveness of service.

B.	Bipartite Faculty. Bipartite faculty are regular academic rank 
	faculty who fill positions that are designated as performing 
	two of the three parts of the university's tripartite 
	responsibility.

	As defined in UAF Faculty Policy (IV.A.2.), only vocational/
	technical faculty and extension agents may hold bipartite rank.  
	No other faculty may hold bipartite rank.

	The determination of which of the criteria defined above will 
	apply to these faculty shall be in accordance with nstitutional 
	needs for the given position, will be coordinated by the dean 
	of the appropriate school or college in consultation with the 
	director, in cases of joint appointment, and with the program 
	faculty.

	While bipartite faculty may choose to engage in a tripartite 
	function, they will not be required to do so as a condition for 
	evaluation, promotion, or tenure.

C. Definitions of Criteria.

1.	Effectiveness in Teaching.

	A central function of the university is instruction of students 
	in formal courses and supervised study. Teaching includes 
	those activities directly related to the formal and informal 
	transmission of appropriate skills and knowledge to students.  
	The nature of instruction will vary for each faculty member, 
	depending upon workload distribution  and the particular 
	teaching mission of the unit. Instruction includes actual contact 
	in classroom or through distance delivery methods, laboratory 
	or field and preparatory activities, such as preparing for 
	lectures, setting up demonstrations, and preparing for 
	laboratory experiments, as well as tutorial sessions, 
	evaluations, correcting papers, and determining grades.  Other 
	aspects of teaching and instruction extend to undergraduate 
	and graduate academic advising and counseling, training 
	graduate students and serving on their graduate committees 
	particularly as their major advisor, curriculum development, 
	and academic recruiting.

	Evidence of excellence in teaching may be demonstrated 
	through, but not limited to, evidence of the various 
	characteristics which define effective teachers.

	Effective teachers

	a. 	are highly organized, plan carefully, use class time 
		efficiently, have clear objectives, have high expectations 
		for students;

	b.	 express positive regard for students, develop good 
		rapport with students, show interest/enthusiasm for 
		the subject;

	c. 	emphasize and encourage student participation, ask 
		questions, frequently monitor student participation for 
		student learning and teacher effectiveness, are sensitive 
		to student diversity;

	d.	emphasize regular feedback to students and reward 
		student learning success;

	e.	demonstrate content mastery, discuss current 
		information and divergent points of view, relate topics 
		to other disciplines, deliver material at the appropriate 
		level;

	f.	regularly develop new courses, workshops and seminars 
		and use a variety of methods of instructional delivery 
		and instructional design.

	G.	OFTEN DEAL WITH STUDENTS IN SMALLER GROUPS.  
		BECAUSE OF THE DEMOGRAPHY OF ALASKA NATIVES 
		AND THE ENDANGERED STATUS OF ALL ALASKA NATIVE 
		LANGUAGES, INDIVIDUAL STUDY CLASSES ARE OFTEN 
		THE ONLY MEANS OF PROVIDING CRUCIAL INSTRUCTION 
		TO MEMBERS OF SMALL NATIVE GROUPS WHO HAVE THE 
		POTENTIAL TO BECOME LINGUISTS AND LANGUAGE 
		SPECIALISTS. 

	H.	ARE REQUIRED TO MAKE THEIR OWN CLASSROOM 
		MATERIALS TO A MUCH GREATER EXTENT THAN IN MOST 
		OTHER DISCIPLINES, SINCE PUBLISHED INSTRUCTIONAL 
		MATERIALS FOR ALASKA NATIVE LANGUAGES ARE 
		LIMITED. 

	i.	Effectiveness in teaching will be evaluated through 
		information on formal and informal teaching, course 
		and curriculum materials, recruiting and advising, 
		training/guiding graduate students, etc., provided by:

		a.	systematic student ratings (required source of 
			data)

		and at least two of the following:

		b.	self-evaluation

		c.	peer/head classroom observation(s)

		d.	peer/head evaluation of course materials

2.	Achievement in Research, Scholarly, and Creative Activity.

	Inquiry and originality are central functions of a land grant/
	sea grant university and all faculty with a research component 
	in their assignment must remain active as scholars.  
	Consequently, faculty are expected to conduct research or 
	engage in other scholarly or creative pursuits that are 
	appropriate to the mission of their unit, and equally important, 
	results of their work must be disseminated through media 
	appropriate to their discipline.  Furthermore, it is important 
	to emphasize the distinction between routine production and 
	creative excellence as evaluated by an individual's peers at 
	the University of Alaska and elsewhere.

	Whatever the contribution, research, scholarly or creative 
	activities must have the following characteristics:

	-	They must occur in a public forum.

	-	They must be evaluated by appropriate peers.

	-	They must be evaluated by peers external to this
		institution so as to allow an objective judgment.

	-	They must be judged to make a contribution.

	Evidence of excellence in research, scholarly, and creative  
	activity may be demonstrated through, but not limited to:

	a.	Books, reviews, monographs, bulletins, articles, 
		proceedings and other scholarly works published by 
		reputable journals, scholarly presses, and publishing 
		houses that accept works only after rigorous review 
		and approval by peers in the discipline.  THE MISSION OF 
		ANLC PROVIDES FOR THE DISTRIBUTION OF NATIVE 
		LANGUAGE PUBLICATIONS, INCLUDING GRAMMARS, 
		DICTIONARIES, TEXTS AND INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS, 
		TO THE PEOPLE OF ALASKA AND NATIVE GROUPS IN 
		PARTICULAR.  THE ALASKA NATIVE LANGUAGE 
		CENTERıS PUBLICATION PROGRAM IS AN EFFECTIVE 
		MEANS OF ACCOMPLISHING THIS GOAL AND IS VIEWED 
		AS A REPUTABLE PRESS IN THE FIELD OF NATIVE 
		AMERICAN LINGUISTICS.  ANLC IS FOREMOST IN 
		PUBLISHING IN ATHABASKAN WORLDWIDE AND 
		FOREMOST IN ESKIMO-ALEUT PUBLISHING IN NORTH 
		AMERICA.  MANUSCRIPTS TO BE PUBLISHED ARE SENT 
		FOR REVIEW AND COMMENT TO APPROPRIATE SPECIALISTS 
		OUTSIDE THE INSTITUTION WHEREVER POSSIBLE.

	b.	Competitive grants and contracts to finance the 
		development of ideas; these grants and contracts being 
		subject to rigorous peer review and approval.

	c.	Presentation of research papers before learned societies 
		that accept papers only after rigorous review and 
		approval by peers.

	d.	Exhibitions of art works at galleries; selection for these 
		exhibitions being based on rigorous review and approval by 
		juries, recognized artists, or critics.

	e.	Performances in recitals or productions; selection for 
		these performances being based on stringent auditions 
		and approval by appropriate judges.

	f.	Presentation of research papers before learned 
		societies.

	g.	Scholarly reviews of publications, art works and 
		performance of the candidate.

	h.	Citations of research in scholarly publications.

	i.	Published abstracts of research papers.

	j.	Reprints or quotations of publications, reproductions of 
		art works, and descriptions of interpretations in the 
		performing arts; these materials appearing in reputable 
		works of the discipline.

	k.	Prizes and awards for excellence of scholarship.

	1.	Awards of special fellowships for research or artistic 
		activities or selection of tours of duty at special 
		institutes for advanced study.

	m.	Development of processes or instruments useful in 
		solving problems, such as computer programs and 
		systems for the processing of data, genetic plant and 
		animal material, and where appropriate obtaining patents 
		and/or copyrights for said development.

	N.	OTHER MEANS OF DISSEMINATING INFORMATION ABOUT 
		ALASKA NATIVE LANGUAGES, SUCH AS MAPS, CDıS, 
		AUDIO TAPES, VIDEO TAPES, AND WEB PAGES. 

	O.	INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS FOR ALASKA NATIVE 
		LANGUAGES. 

	NOTE:  GIVEN THE MISSION OF ANLC, THERE IS OFTEN AN 
	OVERLAP BETWEEN RESEARCH AND PUBLIC SERVICE, SO THAT 
	RESULTS OF RESEARCH ARE MOST OFTEN OF DIRECT BENEFIT TO 
	THE ALASKAN PUBLIC AS WELL AS THE SCHOLARLY COMMUNITY.  
	SINCE  PUBLICATIONS ARE INTENDED FOR THE PUBLIC AND 
	ESPECIALLY THE NATIVE COMMUNITY, THEY VERY OFTEN TAKE A 
	DIFFERENT FORM FROM OTHER SCHOLARLY RESEARCH. 


3.	Effectiveness of Service

	The notion of public service is intrinsic to the land grant/sea 
	grant tradition, and is a fundamental part of the university's 
	obligation to the people of its state.  In this tradition, 
	faculty providing their professional expertise for the benefit 
	of the university's external constituency, free of charge, is 
	identified as "public service."  The tradition of the university 
	itself provides that its faculty assume a collegial obligation 
	for the internal functioning of the institution; such service is 
	identified as "university service."

	a.	Public Service

		Public service is the application of teaching, research, 
		and other scholarly and creative activity to 
		constituencies outside the University of Alaska 
		Fairbanks.  It includes all activities which extend the 
		faculty member's professional, academic, or leadership 
		competence to these constituencies.  It can be 
		instructional, collaborative, or consultative in nature 
		and is related to the faculty member's discipline or  
		other publicly recognized expertise.  Public service may be 
		systematic activity that involves planning with clientele 
		and delivery of information on a continuing, programmatic 
		basis.  It may also be informal, individual, professional 
		contributions to the community or to one's discipline, or 
		other activities in furtherance of the goals and mission 
		of the university and its units; such service may occur on 
		a periodic or limited-term basis.  Examples include, but are 
		not limited to:

		(1)	Providing information services to adults or youth.

		(2)	Service on or to government or public committees.

		(3)	Service on accrediting bodies.

		(4)	Active participation in professional organizations.

		(5)	Active participation in discipline-oriented service 
			organizations.

		(6)	Editing or refereeing articles or proposals for 
			professional journals or organizations.

		(7)	Consulting. 

		(8)	TEACHING OF LINGUISTICS AND ALASKA NATIVE 
			LANGUAGES IN NOT-FOR-CREDIT SITUATIONS. 

		Methods of delivering public service may include, but are 
		not limited to:

		(1)	Leadership of or presentations at workshops, 
			conferences, or public meetings.

		(2)	Training, facilitating, and consultative services.

		(3)	Radio and TV programs, newspaper articles and 
			columns, publications, newsletters, films, 
			computer applications, teleconferences and 
			other educational media.

		(4)	Judging and similar educational assistance at 
			science fairs, state fairs, and speech, drama, 
			literary, and similar competitions.


	b.	University Service

		University service includes those activities involving 
		faculty members in the governance, administration, and 
		other internal affairs of the university, its colleges, 
		schools, and institutes.  It includes non-instructional 
		work with students and their organizations.  Examples 
		of such activity include, but are not limited to:

		(1)	Service on university, college, school, institute, 
			or departmental committees or governing bodies.

		(2)	Consultative work in support of university 
			functions, such as expert assistance for specific 
			projects.

		(3)	Service as department head or similar part-time 
			administrator.

		(4)	Participation in accreditation reviews.

		(5)	Service in support of student organizations and 
			activities.

		(6)	Academic support services such as library and 
			museum programs.

		(7)	Assisting other faculty or units with curriculum 
			planning and delivery of instruction, such as 
			serving as guest lecturer.


	c.	Evaluation of Service

		Each individual faculty member's proportionate 
		responsibility in service shall be reflected in annual 
		workload agreements and performance evaluations. 
		In formulating standards and indices for evaluation, 
		promotion, and tenure, individual units should include 
		examples of service activities appropriate for that 
		unit, and measures for evaluation.  Effectiveness of 
		public service is "demonstrated by such things as:  
		professionally related and publicly recognized service 
		to constituencies external to the university, including 
		public and private sector groups, governmental 
		agencies, boards, commissions, committees, public 
		interest groups, community groups, businesses, and 
		urban and rural residents; successful design and 
		implementation of technology-transfer programs to 
		external constituencies; application of directed 
		research to the needs of constituencies; recognition, 
		awards and honors from constituent groups; and 
		reputation among peer deliverers of public service.  
		Effectiveness of university service is demonstrated 
		by such things as work on university committees and 
		task forces; participation in faculty governance; 
		colleague assistance; administrative work, and work 
		with students beyond formal teacher-student 
		relationships.


***************
ATTACHMENT 92/6
UAF FACULTY SENATE #90
FEBRUARY 7, 2000
SUBMITTED BY CURRICULAR AFFAIRS


Curricular Affairs Committee Minutes,  January 17, 2000

Present:  Carol Barnhardt, Ron Illingworth, Judy Shepherd, Ann Tremarello, 
Gayle Gregory, Wanda Martin,  Chris Hartman, Dave Woodall, Dolly Garza, 
Charlotte Basham (chair)

Old Business
1.  Update on dual enrollment policy change:  The motion passed the 
Senate but has not been signed by the Chancellor.  We may need to 
revisit this item.  Charley will talk with the Provost.

2.  Prerequisite check (Ann T.):  Ann reported that her office has run 
sample reports for 16 Engineering classes this Spring.  She will revise the 
form to be sent out to departments and send a copy to Charley.

New Business
3.  We approved updating credit awards for certification by National 
Institute of Automotive Service Excellence. In most cases this meant 
adjusting the number of credit hours awarded for certification.

4.  We reviewed one BT degree demonstration of competency and 
approved it.  The other two were postponed until the BT committee had 
reviewed them.

5.  Academic Calendar:  We approved the academic calendar as proposed.

6.  Ron Gatterdam requested a list of ways in which a student's GPA is 
used.  Ann T. will compile that list and bring it to our next meeting.

Our next meeting is scheduled for February 21 at 11:00.


***************
ATTACHMENT 92/7
UAF FACULTY SENATE #90
FEBRUARY 7, 2000
SUBMITTED BY FACULTY & SCHOLARLY AFFAIRS


Faculty & Scholarly Affairs Committee Report, 21 January 2000
Submitted by Norm Swazo, Chair

FSAC members, Norm Swazo, Susan Grigg, and Kevin Winker, met on 20 
January for the purpose of reviewing the 12/16/99 draft Regents' Policy, 
"Part II, Chapter VII - Information Resources".   FSAC recommends the 
UAF Faculty Senate endorse the policy as drafted, with the following 
revisions/additions.  The committee also recommends careful review of 
regulations implementing the policy, when these are available, particularly 
as concerns protection and enforcement provisions.

CAPS - 	additions to text
[[   ]] - 	deletions to text

++++++++++++++

P02.07.030  Objectives for Management of Information Resources

A.  respect First Amendment rights and privacy, including academic 
freedom AND PROPRIETARY INTERESTS IN INTELLECTUAL EFFORTS;

P02.07.050  Standards for User Contact

C. will use...and federal law, INCLUDING COPYRIGHT LAW;


P02.07.060  Protection and Enforcement

B. Enforcement
3. IR personnel...practicable.  If, however, the Director of Information 
Resources AND THE UNIVERSITY GENERAL COUNSEL (or the personS 
fulfilling THESE [[that]] functionS) conclude[[s]] that files or information 
resident on or processed through university systems PRESENT PRIMA 
FACIE EVIDENCE [[suggest the possibility]] of a violation...

+++++++++++++

No other business was conducted and the committee adjourned.


***************
ATTACHMENT 92/8
UAF FACULTY SENATE #90
FEBRUARY 7, 2000
SUBMITTED BY GRADUATE & PROFESSIONAL CURRICULAR AFFAIRS


Graduate and Professional Curricular Affairs Committee
Meetings of January 31, 2000 meeting

Present:  James Gardner (Chair), Renee Manfredi, Harikumar Sankaran, 
Vikas Sonwalkar, Joe Kan, Gayle Gregory, a representative for Dennis 
Stephens, and a graduate student representative for Hilary Fletcher.

The committee reviewed and approved the proposal for deletion of Ed. S. 
degree in Cross Cultural Studies.  This proposal will be brought before the 
Administrative Council at its next meeting.

The committee also reviewed the procedures for approval/disapproval of 
courses and degrees, deciding that the committee will officially 
recommend action on such proposals only after approval of the Graduate 
School.  The committee will, however, act as an internal advisory 
committee for the Graduate School during such review processes.

The committee adjourned.


***************
ATTACHMENT 92/9
UAF FACULTY SENATE #90
FEBRUARY 7, 2000
SUBMITTED BY CORE REVIEW


Report of the Core Review Committee - Jin Brown, Chair


Met 24 January, 2000

The Committee authorized the Chair to both write and send letters to all 
departments involved in the Perspectives on the Human Condition areas 
of the Core Curriculum, and teachers of randomly selected "O" and "W" 
courses, in regard to the Student Learning Outcomes Assessment 
Reports due again at the end of this semester.

Subcommittees were formed to:  

  - 	Consider whether the mission of the Core Curriculum would require 
changes in order to align the Core Curriculum to the new mission of the 
University in regard to Self-Study for accreditation.

  - 	 Prepare a statement of philosophy regarding proliferation of 
courses bearing Core credit.

  - 	Move from the assessment reports already done into the writing of 
a Self-Study document for the Core Curriculum.

Core Review took up the matter of Art/Music/Theater 200X and what 
might be done to revise that requirement in order to better serve our 
students while maintaining the concept of aesthetic appreciation in the 
baccalaureate experience of UAF students.  Core Review member Tom 
Riccio has some valuable suggestions that will be put before a working 
group with members from the three departments.

The Committee again discussed the standing problem with MATH 161.  
The Core representative from the Department of Mathematics related 
that the matter has been addressed with no changes in policy.  The 
Committee will continue to grant petitions asking for Core credit for 
MATH 161.


***************
ATTACHMENT 92/10
UAF FACULTY SENATE #90
FEBRUARY 7, 2000
SUBMITTED BY DEVELOPMENTAL STUDIES


Minutes of The Developmental Studies Committee, January 25, 2000

Attending: John Bruder, Rich Carr, Jerah Chadwick, John Creed, Cindy 
Hardy, Marjie Illingworth, Ron Illingworth, Wanda Martin, Greg Owens, Lisa 
Thomas, Jane Weber.

Old Business:  Most of this meeting involved follow-up reports from 
subcommittees formed at the end of the December meeting.

Report on mandatory testing and placement at UAA and UAS:

While both UAA and UAS report that they have mandatory testing and 
placement, this varies, depending on the campus.   At UAS, the Juneau 
campus reported that they have both mandatory testing and placement 
for English and Math, however the Sitka campus may not use the same 
system.   In addition, DEVE at UAS appears to be taught through the 
English department, not separately as at UAF.

At UAA, DEV classes are offered through both the Developmental Studies 
department and the English and Math departments.  For English classes, 
testing is mandatory.  A student must bring an advisor-signed copy of 
ASSET test results to the instructor in order to be admitted to the class.  
If the student's SAT or ACT test scores are high enough to warrant 
admission to the class, this information is provided to the instructor.  
There are no exceptions to this.

In math at UAA, however, the system seems more flexible.  While 
placement is suggested, a student may attempt to persuade the teacher 
to admit him or her into the class.

In a further discussion of mandatory placement for DEV classes, we 
discussed the difficulty of accurate placement.  John Bruder told us that 
colleagues at a math conference reported that, even with mandatory 
placement, students often were not placed correctly.  We discussed 
renorming COMPASS, now that we are starting to have enough data.  
Jane Weber reported that a pilot placement exam for Math 107 will be 
used this summer.  We discussed the advantages and disadvantages of a 
web-based placement exam-particularly for rural students.

Report on using BANNER to track test scores and prerequisites:

This appears to be primarily a programming issue.  Ann T. has asked all 
departments to review prerequisites for every course.  We might want to 
include test scores in this.   While the Registrar's office is reluctant to put 
holds on courses because of missed prerequisites (such as placement 
tests), they can flag them for advising purposes.  Blocking enrollment for 
a prerequisite on UAF courses would block that course system-wide, 
however.   While Ann T. understood our interest in mandatory placement 
based on testing, she says it can't be done yet.

Tracking:

Gregg, our statistics genie, reports that there are interesting results in 
English.  For students who go on to English 111, starting in either 060 or 
070, the success rate is the same.   More students go on to complete 
111 from 070 than from 060, however.  Of the population Greg looked 
at, 76.6% were BA/BS students and 12% were AAS students.

The next step in tracking DEVE students will be to compare these results 
with the non-DEVE-taking population, looking at ACT scores and success 
rates in both groups.  This may give us an idea of how many people are 
properly placed.

New Business:

Accreditation:

Ron has been appointed to head a working group to address DEVS 
accreditation.  Our program fits the perimeters of a department review, 
even though we are scattered across campuses and departments.  Ron 
listed the following steps in the process:

Gathering information
Asking Institutional Research for data
Deciding questions to ask
Putting together a self-study report
Giving report to an outside reader

This needs to be completed before summer.

Ron suggested the following members for the working group:

Greg Owens, Marjie Illingworth, Ron Illingworth, Jane Weber, John Creed, 
Wanda Martin.

The working group will meet Tuesday, February 1.  The DEV committee is 
grateful for their efforts on our behalf.

Meeting times for the Spring Semester:

Thursdays 1-2pm on February 24, March 23, April 30.


***************
ATTACHMENT 92/11
UAF FACULTY SENATE #90
FEBRUARY 7, 2000
SUBMITTED BY FACULTY DEVELOPMENT, ASSESSMENT AND 
IMPROVEMENT


Faculty Development, Assessment and Improvement - Dan White, Chair
Committee report, January 25, 2000

Since the last Administrative Committee meeting the Faculty 
Development, Assessment and Improvement Committee met on 
December 16, 1990 and January 19, 2000 to discuss progress on 
objectives for the 99/00 academic year.

A summary of the meeting's minutes follows:

a.	The committee coordinated the offering of a training session on 
teaching with IT with the Library Tech Center.  The courses were offered 
January 6 and7 and were a success with more than 100 participants.

b.	The committee wishes to host a speaker on faculty development,
assessment and improvement during Spring Break. Tom Robinson had 
several suggestions for speakers, including Susan Wolcott. Tom is now 
working with Joy Morrison, the Provost's faculty development coordinator 
to bring an inspirational speaker to UAF.

c.	The committee plans to host a seminar on how to assemble a 
tenure and promotion file.  The seminar was proposed for the first week 
after Spring Break.  The Chair will consult with the current and past 
tenure and promotion committees to solicit their participation.

d.	The committee discussed the proposal made by Dr. Gatterdam to 
request that faculty host students for dinner on an approximate 5/yr 
basis.  The committee suggests that while this would work well for some, 
perhaps more departmental activities (e.g., picnics, bonfires etc.) would 
have a greater outreach/impact.