FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT:
	Sheri Layral
	312 Signers' Hall
	474-7964   FYSENAT

A G E N D A UAF FACULTY SENATE MEETING #68 Monday, December 9, 1996 1:30 p.m. - 4:45 p.m. Wood Center Ballroom
1:30 I Call to Order - Don Lynch 5 Min. A. Roll Call B. Approval of Minutes to Meeting #67 C. Adoption of Agenda 1:35 II Status of Chancellor's Office Actions 5 Min. A. Motions Approved: 1. Motion on when basic Core skills courses are accomplished. 2. Motion to eliminate registration signature requirement for continuing Graduate Students. 3. Motion to amend Section 3 (ARTICLE V: Committees) E., PERMANENT, 8. of the Bylaws. 4. Motion to amend Section 3 (ARTICLE V: Committees) A., of the Bylaws. B. Motions Pending: none 1:40 III Remarks by Chancellor J. Wadlow & 10 Min. Provost J. Keating Questions 5 Min. 1:55 IV Governance Reports A. ASUAF - C. Wheeler 5 Min. B. Staff Council - R. Pierce 5 Min. C. President's Report - D. Lynch (Attachment 68/1) 5 Min. D. President-Electıs Comments - J. Craven 5 Min. (Attachment 68/2) 2:15 V Public Comments/Questions 5 Min. 2:20 VI New Business A. Motion to change the name of the Alliance of 5 Min. Faculty Senates to the Faculty Alliance (Attachment 68/3), submitted by Administrative Committee B. Motion on deletion of Health Issues 5 Min. Committee (Attachment 68/4), submitted by Administrative Committee C. Motion to adopt procedure for petitions to the 5 Min. Core (Attachment 68/5), submitted by Core Review D. Motion to approve new programs in Health 5 Min. Technology (Attachment 68/6), submitted by Curricular Affairs E. Motion to approve new Certificate in Applied 5 Min. Business (Attachment 68/7), submitted by Curricular Affairs F. Resolution on Union-Governance Relations 5 Min. (Attachment 68/8), submitted by Ad Hoc Committee on Union-Goverance Relations 2:50 ***BREAK*** 10 Min 3:00 G. Motion on changes to the policies on ³W², 10 Min. ³I², and ³NB² (Attachment 68/9), submitted by Curricular Affairs 3:10 VII Guest Speaker - Jim Sampson, Mayor, FNSB 15 Min. 3:25 VIII Committee Reports 30 Min. A. Curricular Affairs - Maynard Perkins (Attachment 68/10) B. Faculty Affairs - Norm Swazo (Attachment 68/11) C. Graduate Curricular Affairs - Mark Tumeo (Attachment 68/12) D. Scholarly Activities - Ron Barry E. CNCSHDR - Rudy Krejci F. Developmental Studies - Ron Illingworth (Attachment 68/13) G. Faculty Appeals & Oversight - Diane Bischak (Handout) H. Faculty Development, Assessment & Improvement - Rich Seifert I. Graduate School Advisory Committee - Peggy Shumaker J. Legislative & Fiscal Affairs - Michael Jennings K. Service Committee - Kara Nance L. University-Wide Promotion/Tenure - John Keller 3:55 IX Discussion Items 5 Min. 4:00 X Members' Comments/Questions 5 Min. 4:05 XI Adjournment ******************** ATTACHMENT 68/1 UAF FACULTY SENATE #68 DECEMBER 9, 1996 President's Summary Report on Board of Regents Meeting Nov. 20-22, 1996 By Don Lynch, President, UAF Faculty Senate The Regents held a Retreat on Wednesday November 20th. My understanding was that this would be a closed meeting. As Larry Weiss' memo indicates, the meeting was for the most part open to the public. Comments later by Regents indicated that they had discussed matters relating to roles and missions and were unhappy with the lack of clarity and specifics in existing mission statements. Dean Vera Alexander presented a Goals, Objectives, and Mission statement developed by the faculty of the School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences at the regular Regent's meeting, and it was extremely well received precisely because it has quantitative objectives. The following motion which was made by Regent Forrer attending his last meeting was passed without objection. "The Board of Regents directs the Academic and Student Affairs Committee to analize/sic/ and develop the idea of combining the three University of Alaska schools of education, initially for the purpose of a substantial response to the emergence of national and state K-12 student and teacher standards, and ultimate for the purpose of consistence and overall quality in the University education department programs. This motion is effective November 22, 1996." The first reading occurred a new policy "Prohibition against Harassment and Discrimination" and presentation of a revised Sexual Harassment Policy. These will be sent to you separately. There was also a discussion of a possible policy on Consenual Sexual Relations. The Natural Resources fund is to produce about $500,000 of revenue this year, the money to be used primarily for distance delivery technology, although some will be employed as a President's special fund. Chancellor Lind, UAS, and April Crosby, Statewide, made a presentation on the University of Alaska Learning Center. The Presentation was quite similar to the one April Crosby made to the Senate. Senators should note that the minutes of the UALC are now on E Mail. The key person on our Campus is Jim Stricks. You should note that the President has requested the Governor to join the Western States Governors Association as a sponsor of the Virtual University. There was a report on the Job Evaluation project which appears to be moving along according to schedule and it also appears that most jobs have been properly classified. There is to be a salary study next year. The new benefits proposals for Classified Employees involve adding another option, called the Economy Option, for people who might not want the full coverage as it exists today, but would rather have greater coverage in a specific areas, e.g. orthodontistry. Dean Carla Kirts is to present new policies regarding student affairs at the February Regents' meeting. The University is to provide a report on benefits according to the forty or so "financially interdependent partners" as its February meeting. Chancellor Lind, UAS, is to propose a new Masters Program in Environmental Science at the February Regent's meeting. Chancellor Gorsuch, UAA, reported on the development of good relations with the Consuls of Japan and Korea. Has a "Telemedical Initiative" with Providence Hospital reaching forty-five members including the Indian Health Service. Tele-radiology and medical advice are part of this program being run through UAA. Chancellor Wadlow, UAF, reported on increased efforts to raise money for the museum expansion. Twelve Grievances were filed this year. Three were withdrawn (apparently after mediation), six were denied as without merit. One case went against the University. There were eleven grievances last year. Increasing employees are involving lawyers in the procedure. The Superior Courts used the records from the hearing councils, the members of which have recently had training. The Grievance Procedure was included in the Regents Agenda. ******************** ATTACHMENT 68/2 UAF FACULTY SENATE #68 DECEMBER 9, 1996 President-Elect's Comments for the UAF Faculty Senate--J. Craven I have two items of interest. ITEM 1. Sheri Layral has pointed out to me that the Senate has indeed not been silent on the question of academic advising, in contradiction to what I said in my last comments. For example, the motion by the UAF Faculty Senate (reproduced below) addresses the question of advising, but does not state a requirement for signatures. Note that the original intent of the motion was altered significantly by the Senate. MOTION PASSED AS AMENDED (Unanimous Approval) ========================== Amend policy on academic advising as exists in catalog to the following: (( )) = deletion CAPS = addition Academic Advising UAF considers advising to be an integral part of the educational process; therefore, the objective of the advising program is to assist students in maximizing their responsibilities for their own academic program and in setting and achieving academic and postgraduate goals. Effective academic advising is perhaps the highest form of service that the individual faculty members can render to students and to UAF. DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE CANDIDATES ARE REQUIRED TO HAVE AN ACADEMIC ADVISOR. Most of those students who have declared majors will be advised by the faculty in the department of the major. Undeclared students, those without majors, will be assigned advisors from the faculty at the UAF campus or unit where they are enrolled. ADVISOR CONSULTATION IS DESIRED BEFORE CLASS SELECTION IS APPROVED AND REGISTRATION IS ALLOWED FOR NON- DEGREE STUDENTS WHO PLAN TO ENROLL IN MORE THAN 9 CREDITS OR WHO HAVE ACCUMULATED 30 UAF CREDITS. Effective: Fall 89 Rationale: Requires advising for students enrolled for three-quarters time loads or those having utilized one year of instruction. Note: Motion to delete advising requirement for students who have accumulated 30 UAF credits failed (8 ayes, 10 nays). Motion to amend motion by having advisor consultation desired instead of required passed (unanimously). Signed: David Smith, President, UAF Faculty Senate Approved: Chancellor O'Rourke 1/5/89 ITEM 2. Pre-requisites. President Lynch pointed out to the chancellor at our 4 November pre-senate meeting that the issue of pre-requisites must be revisited as part of the implementation of BANNER. This is important, as the BANNER system can be implemented so that no student will be allowed to enroll in a course unless all pre-requisites are fulfilled. There was the additional question as to BANNER's ability to handle fractional numbers in the reporting of pluses and minuses (not presently used at UAF). While representing President Lynch at the Staff Council meeting on 6 November, the chancellor expressed further support for our early consideration of this issue. In order to find out what the BANNER system really can do for us, I then addressed several questions to Ann Tremarello. Her limited responses, due to a heavy schedule are provided below (and I have yet to address any follow-up questions to her). It is my poor secretarial skills that have caused this issue to escape my reporting it before now. Ann's Reply. 1. I believe we can handle changes in grading systems much better than on SIS. We have (I think) some way of putting in an effective date for grades to be used (or not used). We also have the ability to develop a "grading mode" that could be used with +/- grades. If this decision is going to be made, it should be made soon. We must put the approved grading modes on every class as we develop the computerized catalog file. We are going to be doing that in the next few weeks. Grades also have to be associated with a level and we have separate levels for the undergraduate and graduate areas of the three MAU's. For example, UF is the level for undergraduate Fairbanks, GS is the graduate level for UAS. (See number 3 below) 2. We are able to put prerequisites on Banner (if they have specific criteria listed - such as, a specific course, a co-requisite, a certain test score, etc.). We can (I think) make failing to meet a prerequisite a "fatal" error which means that if the student does not meet the prerequisite, he/she can not register for the course. Before we all get excited about that, however, I hasten to say that in talking to folks at other institutions with prerequisite checking, they caution its use on line. Many of our students do not have all of their previous academic history on the system - nor will they have it there (non-degree seeking, graduate students taking undergraduate courses, transfer students waiting for credits to be evaluated). More than half of the students at UAF are non-degree seeking. This could be a terrible frustration for students. Most other institutions send lists of the names of students who do not appear to meet course prerequisites to instructors who, in turn, can talk personally to the students to check their eligibility for the courses. 3. It is true that all three MAU's are using a common system and there are many things that will have to be done the same. Our Banner work teams are identifying those areas where things must be the same and are bringing those items forward to the appropriate body for consideration. We will have a common computer catalog, for example, but all course number will carry the MAU's designator (F, A, or S) in the first digit of the course number. For example, UAF's English 111X will become English F111X. We have level codes for both students and courses that will reflect the MAU associated with either the student or course. We also have campus codes and are developing site codes. 4. When will Banner be up and running? Well--that's a good question. We are supposed to be ready to do priority registration for summer and fall of 1997 during the spring of 1997. Our published date for the beginning of fall semester priority registration is March 31. ******************** ATTACHMENT 68/3 UAF FACULTY SENATE #68 DECEMBER 9, 1996 SUBMITTED BY ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE MOTION: ======= The UAF Faculty Senate moves to approve changing the name of the Alliance of Faculty Senates to Faculty Alliance. EFFECTIVE: Immediately RATIONALE: This name change is proposed by the Alliance which is a coordinating body of all three campus governing bodies because of the University of Alaska Southeast Reorganization. In this change, Southeast has replaced its Senate with a Council, and, therefore, the current name is not correct. The change to Faculty Alliance is appropriate. ******************** ATTACHMENT 68/4 UAF FACULTY SENATE #68 DECEMBER 9, 1996 SUBMITTED BY ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE MOTION ======= The UAF Faculty Senate moves to disband the Health Issues Committee of the UAF Governance Coordinating Committee and approves the following revisions to the Procedures: (( )) = Deletion ARTICLE V Committees Sect. 1 The conference committees of the UAF Governance Coordinating Committee shall include: Academic Computer Users Committee Intercollegiate Athletics Committee Chancellorıs Advisory Committee on Public Safety, Transportation and Parking Rural Affairs Committee UAF Grievance Council ((Health Issues)) Sect. 3 Conference Committees Charges ((F. Health Issues Committee The charge of the Health Issues committee shall be to: 1. address health issues which affect the work environment. 2. coordinate efforts with the Health Center, Fire Department, Risk Management, and Public Safety to find solutions to health issues.)) EFFECTIVE: Upon Faculty Senate, Staff Council, and ASUAF approval, prior to Chancellorıs approval RATIONALE: A Statewide committee has been formed to address possible changes to the health benefits program. The Health Issues Committee would only duplicate efforts by this committee and would not be a productive use of staff, faculty and student time. ******************** ATTACHMENT 68/5 UAF FACULTY SENATE #68 DECEMBER 9, 1996 SUBMITTED BY CORE REVIEW MOTION: ======= The UAF Faculty moves to adopt a procedure to be followed in petitions to the CORE based on documentation of student disability as recommended by the CORE Review Committee. **************************** PETITION PROCEDURE The student prepares a petition which is signed by the Coordinator for Students with Disabilities as advisor. The petition is sent directly to the Registrar for routing. Registrar logs the petition and sends it directly to the Chair of the CORE Review Committee. The Chair of CORE Review and the Coordinator of Students with Disabilities jointly access the documentation of the student's disability in regard to the specifics of the petition. The Chair of CORE Review, after viewing the documentation in regard to the specifics of the petition makes a recommendation directly to the Provost. The Provost makes a final decision based on the recommendation and forwards the decision to Registrar. EFFECTIVE: Immediately RATIONALE: Diane Preston, Counselor/Coordinator for Students with Disabilities, has contacted Provost John Keating in regard to petitions to the CORE requirements from students with documented disabilities. Her concern regards students who, because of documented disabilities, may be incapable of accomplishing specific CORE coursework. Her example is a student with learning disabilities who petitions to waive the Math requirement because she or he will never be able to process the material required. If such a student petitions based on her or his documented disability, there is no procedure for adjudicating the petition specifically in regard to the student's documentation. The complication is that the documentation of disability is protected student information beyond the "Buckley" guidelines (often private medical information). What makes this problematic is the matter of who is given access to the documentation. The Provost has asked that CORE Review suggest a solution that protects the privacy of the documentation of students with disabilities and allows good decisions to be made in regard to the academic purposes of the CORE. In that actual instances of such cases are quite small, the above procedure is recommended for implemention. ******************** ATTACHMENT 68/6 UAF FACULTY SENATE #68 DECEMBER 9, 1996 SUBMITTED BY CURRICULAR AFFAIRS MOTION ======= The UAF Faculty Senate moves to approve a new program in Health Technology which includes an AAS in Medical Assistant and two certificates: Medical/Dental Reception and Phlebotomy & Laboratory Assisting. EFFECTIVE: Upon Board of Regentsı Approval RATIONALE: See attached Executive Summary. Full program proposal #83 on file in the Governance Office, 312 Signersı Hall. ********************** Executive Summary of Medical Assistant Certificate and Degree Program Request, Division of Health Technology, College of Rural Alaska Request prepared by: Betsy Tozzi, Assistant Professor, Health Technology, CRA/TVC Linda Curda, Assistant Professor, Division Head, Health Technology, CRA/KUC Ruth Lister, Director, Tanana Valley Campus, College of Rural Alaska The Medical Assistant Certificate and A.A.S. Programs prepare students for careers as health care paraprofessionals. Employers have indicated needs for workers that crossed functional borders within their organizations (i.e. identified the need for skilled, cross-trained individuals), and most frequently cited a need for administrative staff (receptionists and billing/reimbursement specialists) and out-patient care paraprofessionals (phlebotomists, procedure assistants, instrument care specialists). The specialty certificates in Medical/Dental Reception and Phlebotomy and Lab Assisting as well as the Medical Assistant A.A.S. degree have been designed to be responsive to these local employers' needs. Welfare reform has reduced education and training benefits to eligible recipients; eligible individuals may receive financial support for a maximum of 12 months. To address these welfare reform changes and the needs of many students to enter the work force as soon as possible, the Medical/Dental Reception Certificate and Phlebotomy and Lab Assisting Certificate programs document proficiency in specialized skill areas and provide employment options when students have completed approximately 1/2 the necessary credits required for the Medical Assistant A.A.S. degree. After graduating with a certificate, a student may elect to complete the Medical Assistant A.A.S. degree requirements in order to enhance employability. As a direct result of their course work within the program, three students have been hired as phlebotomists in Fairbanks, and one of these three individuals has already sat for the ASCP national examination and received a passing score, thereby achieving national certification as a Phlebotomy Technician (PBT, ASCP). These proposed programs have been developed to align with the UAF 2000 strategic plan. As accreditation of health care programs will be required for students to be eligible to sit for national certification examinations, curricula have been constructed to meet all necessary accreditation standards. Inasmuch as all required program components have been developed and are in place, no complications are foreseen in implementation of certificate and A.A.S. degree programs upon approval. Resources and equipment needs will not require allocation of any additional funds to Tanana Valley Campus or College of Rural Alaska. No new funding is required or requested to support the programs. Disposable medical supplies for classes are paid for with student material fees; donations of equipment and supplies from numerous sources have helped offset start-up costs and ongoing expenditures. In conclusion, due to current and future needs for skilled health care workers and cost containment mandates in health care, the Medical Assistant Certificate and A.A.S. Degree programs in the College of Rural Alaska are well positioned to provide vocational-technical training for interested students. The implementation of these programs will benefit the university by generating increased student credit hours and improved ties with the community, employers, and government agencies. The Medical / Dental Reception Certificate, Phlebotomy and Lab Assisting Certificate, and the Medical Assistant A.A.S. degree programs will generate a cadre of well-qualified cross-trained health care paraprofessionals and allow employers to recruit from their local communities rather than hiring new staff from outside of Alaska. October 28, 1996 ******************** ATTACHMENT 68/7 UAF FACULTY SENATE #68 DECEMBER 9, 1996 SUBMITTED BY CURRICULAR AFFAIRS MOTION ======= The UAF Faculty Senate moves to approve the Certificate in Applied Business. EFFECTIVE: Upon Board of Regentsı Approval RATIONALE: See attached Executive Summary. Full program proposal #48 on file in the Governance Office, 312 Signersı Hall. *********************** CERTIFICATE OF APPLIED BUSINESS UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA FAIRBANKS COLLEGE OF RURAL ALASKA TANANA VALLEY CAMPUS Regents Executive Summary The UAF College of Rural Alaska proposes an innovative vocational, technical education certificate in Applied Business. This certificate is intended to serve Alaskan businesses and organizations by providing a pool of graduates who have received comprehensive training (30 credits) in critical aspects of business management. The certificate will further act as a stepping stone for the Associates Degree in Applied Business and various Bachelor Degrees. Currently, there are over 60 declared majors in the Applied Business program and credit hour production increased 30% in the fall of 1996 compared to fall of 1995. While subscription to the applied business courses are strong, the credit hours do not currently produce a corresponding number of graduates Low numbers of graduates are a result of program demographics. Nearly all students are non- traditional and part-time (i.e. more mature, experienced, and working full or part-time, taking 6 credits). As a result of work and family demands completing all the academic requirements for an A.A.S. may take more than 5 years. This intermediate vocational education certificate is therefore vital to continued student motivation. Many small to medium size business, non-profits, and agencies in Fairbanks promote employees into management positions without benefit of formal supervisory training. There is a strong need for a structured and credible management training certificate program in Fairbanks. The Northwest, Kuskokwim, and Tanana Valley Campuses already provide that management training through existing applied business courses as part of the A.A.S. degree. An intent of this certificate is to "bundle" those courses already offered in other programs into a meaningful management curriculum which will fulfill a current training need in both Rural Alaska and Fairbanks and provide a path for business people who have no college experience to earn degrees. Faculty who teach the courses required in this certificate have significant credibility within their respective local business sectors. Once the certificate program is approved, the College of Rural Alaska Applied Business department will implement an image campaign to stimulate additional demand by business for employees awarded this certificate. Implementation of the Certificate in Applied Business will support the University of Alaska's commitment to business development within the State of Alaska and the vocational education component of the university's mission. Credits from the certificate are readily transferred and accepted within the A.A.S. business degrees of UAA and UAF. Implementation of the certificate will significantly benefit students who transfer between universities prior to award of their A.A.S. degree. Finally, there is no additional cost to UAF or the University of Alaska System for this certificate. All faculty required to teach the certificate courses are currently employed and all courses required are currently offered through other degree programs. 9/30/96 ******************** ATTACHMENT 68/8 UAF FACULTY SENATE #68 DECEMBER 9, 1996 SUBMITTED BY AD HOC COMMITTEE ON UNION-GOVERNANCE RELATIONS RESOLUTION =========== WHEREAS the UAF Faculty Senate is the duly elected assembly of faculty representatives, serving as the legislative body of the university faculty, having authority to recommend on formulation and implementation of policy pertinent to faculty governance at UAF; and WHEREAS the UAF Faculty Senate carries out the tasks of faculty governance through a number of Standing and Permanent Committees; and WHEREAS the charge of the UAF Faculty Senate's various Standing and Permanent Committees includes evaluation and recommendation on policy initiatives affecting faculty governance; and WHEREAS the UAF Faculty Senate's Standing Committee on Faculty Affairs and the UAF Faculty Senate's Ad Hoc Committee on Union-Governance Relations have specific charge to evaluate and recommend on policy directly and substantially pertinent to mandatory items of collective bargaining; and WHEREAS United Academics/AAUP-AFT is a duly recognized collective bargaining agent negotiating with the University of Alaska Administration on behalf of faculty concerns; and WHEREAS United Academics/AAUP-AFT, notwithstanding its legally independent incorporation, is constituted inter alia explicitly to sustain and enhance faculty governance at the University of Alaska; THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED That the UAF Faculty Senate hereby requests the Executive Board of United Academics/AAUP- AFT: (1) to reaffirm, by way of written communication to the President of the UAF Faculty Senate and to the President of the Faculty Alliance, UA/AAUP-AFT's commitment to sustain and enhance faculty governance at the University of Alaska; (2) to make provision, by way of exchange of written and oral communications, for the UAF Senate's Ad Hoc Committee on Union-Governance Relations to review and recommend on the substance of UA/AAUP-AFT contract negotiations with the University of Alaska Administration; (3) to include a member of the UAF Faculty Senate's Standing Committee on Faculty Affairs, who is also a member of United Academics, in UA/AAUP-AFT Executive Board deliberations on contract negotiations; and, (4) to appoint, as representative of the UAF Faculty Senate, a member of the UAF Faculty Senate's Standing Committee on Faculty Affairs, who is also a member of United Academics, to the UA/AAUP-AFT Contract Negotiating Team, with all rights and privileges of participation thereto pertaining. ******************** ATTACHMENT 68/9 UAF FACULTY SENATE #68 DECEMBER 9, 1996 SUBMITTED BY CURRICULAR AFFAIRS MOTION ======= The UAF Faculty Senate moves to change the policies on "Withdrawing from a Class" and "Faculty Initiated Withdrawal" and the grading policies of "I" Incomplete and "NB" No Basis, as follows: (( )) = deletions, CAPS = ADDITIONS Withdrawing from a Class -- If you withdraw from a class after the third Friday after the first day of instruction, a grade of "W" will appear on your academic record. The "W" grade does not affect your GPA. The last day you can withdraw from a class is the ((fourth)) SIXTH Friday after the first day of instruction. ((unless you are a freshman or a non-degree students. Freshman and non-degree students may withdraw from classes until the sixth Friday after the first day of instruction.)) Faculty Initiated Withdrawal/DROP-- ((If you do not meet the prerequisites for a course in which you have enrolled the faculty member teaching that course has the right to drop you from the class prior to the fourth Friday after the first day of instruction. )) IF YOU DO NOT MEET THE PREREQUISITES FOR A COURSE IN WHICH YOU HAVE ENROLLED, OR IF YOU HAVE NOT TURNED IN ANY OF THE ASSIGNED WORK AS OF THE DATE BEING WITHDRAWN, THE FACULTY MEMBER TEACHING THAT COURSE HAS THE RIGHT TO WITHDRAW YOU FROM THE CLASS BY THE SIXTH FRIDAY AFTER THE FIRST DAY OF INSTRUCTION. IF YOU ARE WITHDRAWN FROM A CLASS AFTER THE THIRD FRIDAY AFTER THE FIRST DAY OF INSTRUCTION, A GRADE OF "W" WILL APPEAR ON YOUR ACADEMIC RECORD. FACULTY INITIATED WITHDRAWALS PREVIOUS TO THE THIRD FRIDAY AFTER THE FIRST DAY OF INSTRUCTION WILL BE TREATED AS A DROPPED CLASS. "I" Incomplete-- A temporary grade used to indicate that ((you've satisfactorily completed (C or better) the majority of the work in a course, but for personal reasons beyond your control,)) YOU haven't been able to complete the course during the scheduled course time. When the "I" grade is given, the instructor includes a statement of the work required of you to complete the course AND THE TIME LIMITS YOU HAVE TO COMPLETE THE WORK. THE MAXIMUM TIME TO BE ALLOWED IS ONE YEAR. AT THE END OF THE DEFINED TIME LIMITS THE INSTRUCTOR MAY ISSUE A GRADE BASED ON THE WORK TURNED IN. IF THE INSTRUCTOR DOES NOT CHANGE THE "I" GRADE IT BECOMES PERMANENT AT THE END OF ONE YEAR. ((You must make up an incomplete within one year or it will automatically be changed to an "F" grade.)) The "I" grade is not computed in your GPA. ((until it has been changed to a regular letter grade by the instructor or until one year has elapsed, at which time it will be computed as an "F")) Seniors cannot graduate with an "I" grade in either a UAF or major course requirement. ((To determine a senior's GPA at graduation , an "I" grade will be computed as a failing grade)) (("NB" No Basis-- Instructors may award a No Basis (NB) grade if there is insufficient student progress and/or attendance for evaluation to occur. No credit is given, nor is ³NB² calculated in the GPA. This is a permanent grade and may not be used to substitute for the Incomplete (I). It canıt be removed by later completing outstanding work.)) EFFECTIVE: Fall 1997 RATIONALE: With the change in the cap on tuition student credit shopping does not seem to be a problem, which was one of the main reasons for the double tiering of the original policy. This change makes the withdrawal policy uniform for all students. This policy does not effect the CRA policy which states that students have nine weeks for their withdrawal period. The faculty initiated withdrawal policy change gives the instructor the ability to remove from the class students who have a very high probability of failing the class if they were to attempt to start participation at a later date. It also provides a bit of a grade safety net for students who for what ever reason sign up for a class and then never turn in any work, but also never withdraw, from accumulating a series of "F" grades. Students who are Faculty dropped during the first three weeks, because they do not meet the course prerequisites, will not have the course appear on their transcript and they will receive a full tuition refund. Students who are Faculty Withdrawn after the fourth Friday will receive a "W" on their transcript and will not receive any tuition refund. This may place students who are receiving financial aid in jeopardy of loosing that aid but in most cases this policy will be no more onerous than if the student received a grade other than an A, B, C, or D. This change in the ³I² grade gives the instructor the option to control the time limits and to issue a grade based on the work turned in. The permanent "I" more correctly reflects what the student did not accomplish, as compared to the transformation of the "I" to an "F". A student who receives a permanent "I" grade would have to retake the course to earn credit. The criteria by which the instructor will issue the "I" can be delineated at the beginning of the course, just as they do for all other grades. As per the catalog instructors are expected to state their grading policies in writing at the beginning of each course. Changes in the "I", and "W" grading policies address the purposes for having the "NB" grade. Therefore the "NB" grade is no longer needed. ******************** ATTACHMENT 68/10 UAF FACULTY SENATE #68 DECEMBER 9, 1996 SUBMITTED BY CURRICULAR AFFAIRS Minutes of Curricular Affairs Meeting November 22, 1996 Meeting Chaired by Maynard Perkins Minutes by Carol Barnhardt Quorum Established: Carol Barnhardt, Joan Braddock, John Creed, Gayle Gregory, Jerry McBeath, Terry McFadden, Joshua McKinley, Wanda Martin, Maynard Perkins, Ann Tremarello, Jane Weber AGENDA ITEMS 1. CERTIFICATE OF TRANSFER CREDIT Motion: Move to add additional certificates to the approved list for transfer credit consideration and to also approve those previously identified (as listed on pages 81-87 in the 1996 UAF faculty Advisor Manual). see Senate office for list of additional certification requests. ACTION: Passed unanimously 2. Grading Options MOTIONS ON THE "I², ³W", "NB" grades. These motions are a slight modification of the motions forwarded to CA from the subcommittee formed from the CA and Developmental Committees. (( )) indicate deletions, CAPITAL LETTERS INDICATE INSERTIONS I. The UAF Faculty Senate moves to change the "Withdrawing from a class policy" as follows: If you withdraw from a class after the third Friday after the first day of instruction, a grade of "W" will appear on your academic record. The "W" grade does not affect your GPA. The last day you can withdraw from a class is the ((fourth)) SIXTH Friday after the first day of instruction. ((unless you are a freshman or a non-degree students. Freshman and non-degree students may withdraw from classes until the sixth Friday after the first day of instruction.)) RATIONALE: With the change in the cap on tuition student credit shopping does not seem to be a problem, which was one of the main reasons for the double tiering of the original policy. This policy change makes the policy uniform for all students. This policy does not effect the CRA policy which states that students have nine weeks for their withdrawal period. II. The UAF Faculty Senate moves to change the faculty initiated withdrawal policy as follows: Faculty Initiated Withdrawal/Drop (If you do not meet the prerequisites for a course in which you have enrolled the faculty member teaching that course has the right to drop you from the class prior to the fourth Friday after the first day of instruction.)) IF YOU DO NOT MEET THE PREREQUISITES FOR A COURSE IN WHICH YOU HAVE ENROLLED, OR IF YOU HAVE NOT TURNED IN ANY OF THE ASSIGNED WORK AS OF THE DATE BEING WITHDRAWN, THE FACULTY MEMBER TEACHING THAT COURSE HAS THE RIGHT TO WITHDRAW YOU FROM THE CLASS BY THE SIXTH FRIDAY AFTER THE FIRST DAY OF INSTRUCTION. IF YOU ARE WITHDRAWN FROM A CLASS AFTER THE THIRD FRIDAY AFTER THE FIRST DAY OF INSTRUCTION, A GRADE OF "W" WILL APPEAR ON YOUR ACADEMIC RECORD. FACULTY INITIATED WITHDRAWALS PREVIOUS TO THE THIRD FRIDAY AFTER THE FIRST DAY OF INSTRUCTION WILL BE TREATED AS A DROPPED CLASS. RATIONALE: This policy change gives the instructor the ability to remove from the class students who have a very high probability of failing the class if they were to attempt to start participation at a later date. It also provides a bit of a grade safety net for students who for what ever reason sign up for a class and then never turn in any work, but also never withdraw, from accumulating a series of "F" grades. Students who are Faculty dropped during the first four weeks, because they do not meet the course prerequisites, will not have the course appear on their transcript and they will receive a full tuition refund. Students who are Faculty Withdrawn after the fourth Friday will receive a "W" on their transcript and will not receive any tuition refund. This may place students who are receiving financial aid in jeopardy of loosing that aid but in most cases this policy will be no more onerous than if the student received a grade other than an A, B, C, or D. III. The UAF Faculty Senate moves to change the incomplete grade policy as follows: A temporary grade used to indicate that ((you've satisfactorily completed (C or better) the majority of the work in a course, but for personal reasons beyond your control,)) YOU haven't been able to complete the course during the scheduled course time. When the "I" grade is given, the instructor includes a statement of the work required of you to complete the course AND THE TIME LIMITS YOU HAVE TO COMPLETE THE WORK. THE MAXIMUM TIME TO BE ALLOWED IS ONE YEAR. AT THE END OF THE DEFINED TIME LIMITS THE INSTRUCTOR MAY ISSUE A GRADE BASED ON THE WORK TURNED IN. IF THE INSTRUCTOR DOES NOT CHANGE THE "I" GRADE IT BECOMES PERMANENT AT THE END OF ONE YEAR. ((You must make up an incomplete within one year or it will automatically be changed to an "F" grade.)) The "I" grade is not computed in your GPA. ((until it has been changed to a regular letter grade by the instructor or until one year has elapsed, at which time it will be computed as an "F")) Seniors cannot graduate with an "I" grade in either a UAF or major course requirement. ((To determine a senior's GPA at graduation, an "I" grade will be computed as a failing grade)) Rationale: This gives the instructor the option to control the time limits and to issue a grade based on the work turned in. The permanent "I" more correctly reflects what the student did not accomplish, as compared to the transformation of the "I" to an "F". A student who receives a permanent "I" grade would have to retake the course to earn credit. The criteria by which the instructor will issue the "I" can be delineated at the beginning of the course, just as they do for all other grades. As per the catalog instructors are expected to state their grading policies in writing at the beginning of each course. IV. The UAF Faculty Senate moves to remove the NB grade from the list of possible grades issued to UAF students. Rationale: The Senate's December 9, 1996 motions that change the "I", and "W" grading policies address the purposes for having the "NB" grade. Therefore the "NB" grade is no longer needed. ACTION: Passed unanimously 3. REQUEST TO DEVELOP MOTION ON RESIDENCY CREDITS AS EFFECTED BY DISTANCE DELIVERY COURSES MOTION: Motion moved and seconded to accept all UALC courses as meeting residency credits. DISCUSSION: Through discussion of the request to develop a motion on residency credits, the Committee recognized that there are several important policy issues that need to be examined before a motion can be put forward. Committee members will gather information on the impact of this motion and talk with others about the implications for students, degree programs and the BANNER system if this motion were accepted. ACTION: The motion was tabled to allow Committee members time to get additional information. 4. COURSE PREREQUISITES AND TRANSFER OF CREDIT WITHIN THE UA SYSTEM AS APPLIED TO THE GRADE OF D. ACTION: No action was taken on these issues. The meeting adjourned at 11:50. ******************** ATTACHMENT 68/11 UAF FACULTY SENATE #68 DECEMBER 9, 1996 SUBMITTED BY FACULTY AFFAIRS Faculty Affairs Committee Report - Norm Swazo, Chair The Faculty Affairs Committee met on November 21, 1996. Items on the agenda included: (1) the Criminal Justice Program proposal for admission standards, (2) the role of department heads on unit peer review committees, (3) a faculty ethics statement, and (4) standards governing the interdisciplinary Ph.D. program. Disposition of each item is as follows: (1) The Committee agreed to review communications between Professor Copus and Maynard Perkins, chair of Curricular Affairs. The Committee may discuss the issue with Professor Copus at some future date. (2) The Committee submitted a motion to the Administrative Committee, the motion seeking to clarify and reaffirm current regulations on the role of department heads. The Administrative Committee reviewed the motion at its meeting on 25 November and referred the motion to the Committee for further work. Accordingly, a motion on this item can be expected for the Senate meeting in February. (3) The Committee discussed some further preliminaries concerning a proposed Faculty Ethics Statement for UAF. Rather than "reinvent the wheel" on this issue, the Committee thinks it may be a fruitful strategy simply to appropriate the AAUP Statement on Professional Ethics and a portion of its remarks on "Freedom and Responsibility". The Committee will continue examining the draft statement and invite review and comment from Faculty Appeals & Oversight's subcommittee charged with this issue. (4) The Committee considered briefly some concerns about the interdisciplinary Ph.D. program at UAF. Some faculty have expressed concern that there is some confusion about whether the regulations governing the regular Ph.D. pertain to the interdisciplinary Ph.D. degree. There is need for clarification, e.g., about whether the interdisciplinary degree requires a dissertation rather than a "project". At issue here is whether the interdisciplinary degree has the status of an academic degree or can be interpreted to be a professional doctorate. The latter interpretation might then allow for a "project" substituting for a dissertation. The Faculty Affairs Committee finds this potential interpretation problematic. There is also the matter of distinguishing between (a) a faculty person serving on an interdisciplinary doctoral student's committee and (b) a department's faculty having some say in whether a department will participate as a "department of focus". Current regulations speak of a department of focus which can be misconstrued such to mean that the degree is awarded in the discipline of that department. The point here is that the degree is awarded in interdisciplinary studies, and not in the discipline of focus. Candidates and faculty need to be clear on the intent of these regulations. Accordingly, the Faculty Affairs Committee is transmitting these concerns by memo to Graduate Curricular Affairs for review and action. ******************** ATTACHMENT 68/12 UAF FACULTY SENATE #68 DECEMBER 9, 1996 SUBMITTED BY GRADUATE CURRICULAR AFFAIRS Minutes of the Meeting of the Graduate Curricular Affairs Committee November 18, 1996 Members Present: James Beget, Mark Tumeo, Peter Schweitzer, John Kelly, ex-officio Dennis Stephens, ex-officio Gayle Gregory, ex- officio Marcus Ortelee Members Absent: ex-officio Joe Kan, Members Excused: Kara Nance The meeting was called to order at noon in the Chancellor's Conference Room. The next meeting of the Committee is scheduled for Noon, Monday, December 16 in the Chancellor's Conference Room. The entire meeting was dedicated to the review of proposed graduate course changes, additions, deletions, etc., and the review of proposed cross-listings of graduate level (600) courses with undergraduate (400) courses. ITEM 1: Course Changes/Deletions, etc. Not Approved The following courses were returned without approval based on the formal request of the Chair of the Education Department. The Department Chair has been notified of this action via a memorandum from the Chair of the Graduate Curricular Affairs Committee. 3. CHANGE COURSE: ED 674- Program Planning and Management 4. CHANGE COURSE: ED 675- Internship Management Practicum The following request to drop a course not approved based on the objection of individuals within the University. The Department of Education was contacted and asked to submit a justification for dropping the course in the face of the objection, but chose not to respond. The Committee returned the request and urges the Department to consult more fully with the rural campuses to ensure all parties are aware of proposed changes and the justification underlying them. The Department Chair has been notified of this action via a memorandum from the Chair of the Graduate Curricular Affairs Committee. 39. DROP COURSE: ED 580- Wildlife and Wetlands Curricula The following program change was held in abeyance until discussions with the Department Head are completed. The Committee feels the proposed change is in fact the creation of a new program. The committee has no objection to the proposed new program, but does not have the authority to grant final authorization for such a change. The committee will work with the Department Chair to advance the proposal to the next required stage of review if so desired, but additional paperwork will have to be completed by the Department. The Chair of the Department has been notified of this action by the Chair of the Graduate Curricular Affairs Committee. 31. PROGRAM CHANGE: MS, Natural Resources Management- Retitle ITEM 2: Cross-Listings Not Approved The following request to cross-list undergraduate 400 level courses with graduate 600 level courses was denied because the request did not contain adequate explanation as to how the graduate course offering would be substantively different than the undergraduate course offering. The Department Chair has been notified of this action via a memorandum from the Chair of the Graduate Curricular Affairs Committee. 27. CHANGE COURSE: MUS 351 O- Conducting ITEM 3: Approval of Course Changes/Deletions, etc. Motion: It was moved by John Kelly, seconded by Jim Beget and passed without objection that the following graduate course requests be approved. SUBMITTED BY COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 1. PROGRAM CHANGE: MA, Anthropology 2. CHANGE COURSE: ED 621- Cultural Aspects of Language 5. . DROP COURSE: COUN 610- Culture and the Counselor 6. DROP COURSE: COUN 611- Theory Building for Counselors 7. NEW COURSE: COUN 630- Appraisal for School Counselors 8. NEW COURSE: COUN 632- Career Development 9. NEW COURSE: LING 601- Principles of Linguistic Analysis 10. NEW COURSE: LING 602- Second Language Acquisition (3+0) 11. PROGRAM CHANGE: MA, Music 12. PROGRAM CHANGE: MA, Northern Studies 13. NEW COURSE: PS 448/NORS 648- Environmental Politics/Circumpolar North 14. NEW COURSE: PS 449/NORS 650- Comparative Gov and Politics/Circumpolar North 15. NEW COURSE: PS 451/NORS 651- Law, Justice and Society/ Circumpolar North 16. NEW COURSE: PS 452 /NORS 652- International Relations of the North SUBMITTED BY COLLEGE OF RURAL ALASKA 17. NEW COURSE: CIOS 501- Electronic Mail & On-line Services, 18. NEW COURSE: CIOS 502- Using the Internet 19. NEW COURSE: CIOS 503- Applying Telecommunications SUBMITTED BY COLLEGE OF SCIENCES, ENGINEERING & MATHEMATICS 20. NEW COURSE: BIOL/WLF 636- Life History Evolution 21. CHANGE COURSE: CHEM 606- Atmospheric Chemistry 22. CHANGE COURSE: CHEM 631- Environmental Physical Chemistry 23. DROP COURSE: CHEM 662- Biochemical and Molecular Biology Research Techniques 24. CHANGE COURSE: EQE 641- Environmental Quality Science Measurements 25. CHANGE COURSE: EQE 647- Biotechnology 26. CHANGE COURSE: EQE 648- Solid Waste Management 27. CHANGE COURSE: EQE 650- Advanced Hazardous Waste Management 28. CHANGE COURSE: GEOS 600- Introduction to X-ray Spectrometry SUBMITTED BY SCHOOL OF AG AND LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 29. CHANGE COURSE: NRM 630-Resource Planning Theory 30. NEW COURSE: NRM 601- Research Methods in Natural Resources Management SUBMITTED BY SCHOOL OF FISHERIES & OCEAN SCIENCES 32. CHANGE COURSE: MSL 652- Marine Ecosystems 33. PROGRAM CHANGE: Ph.D., Oceanography SUBMITTED BY SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT 34. CHANGE COURSE: ECON 670- Seminar in Research Methodology 35. DROP COURSE: ECON 638- Marine Policy Analysis 36. PROGRAM CHANGE: MS, Resource Economics SUBMITTED BY SCHOOL OF MINERAL ENGINEERING 37. NEW COURSE: PETE 656-Advanced Petroleum Economic Analysis 38. PROGRAM CHANGE: MS, Petroleum Engineering ITEM 4: Approval of Cross-Listings Motion: It was moved by John Kelly, seconded by Peter Schweitzer and passed without objection that the following graduate course cross-listings with undergraduate courses be approved and forwarded to the Undergraduate Curricular Affairs Committee for approval. 1. NEW COURSE: ANTH 432/632- Field Methods in Descriptive Linguistics 18. CHANGE COURSE: GEOG/NRM 463/663- Wilderness Concepts 29. CHANGE COURSE: PS 210- Alaska Government and Politics 105. CHANGE COURSE: BIOL/CHEM 453/653- Molecular Biology in the Real World 106. NEW COURSE: BIOL 416/616- Neurobiology ******************** ATTACHMENT 68/13 UAF FACULTY SENATE #68 DECEMBER 9, 1996 SUBMITTED BY DEVELOPMENTAL STUDIES COMMITTEE Developmental Studies Committee, Ronald D. Illingworth, Co-Chair Senate Report -- December 1996 The Faculty Senate Developmental Studies Committee continues investigations into ways of affecting the climate for learning at all of the UAF campuses. The underlying presumption is that we, as faculty, can have a positive effect on this climate and that there are things which we, as faculty, can do to affect it. Improving the learning climate, we believe, will also increase retention. We have several initiatives in progress at this time. Currently under discussion are proposals dealing with students on academic probation, grading approaches for Developmental courses, and course loads restrictions for students on academic probation. Other initiatives which will continue during this year include: --Discussions involving improving the campus climate for learning at UAFıs Fairbanks and rural campuses. These include what areas can or should be changed, who is responsible for those areas, and what can be done to affect change. --Enhancing the opportunity for student educational success. --Better identification of student starting points -- Improving student placement into specific courses --Renorming of the American College Testing ASSET test for UAFıs Fairbanks and rural campuses in order to ensure its applicability to our student population. --Evaluation of the Supplemental Instruction system for possible implementation in a video supplemental instruction (VSI) mode with selected courses for UAFıs Fairbanks and rural campuses. VSI is a successful industry initiative which has been adapted for post- secondary use. --Discussions involving the relationship between student financial aid, grading policies, and developmental classes. --Development of institutional research data regarding students involved in developmental classes at UAF.