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Sheri Layral

312 Signers' Hall

474-7964 FYSENAT

 

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Fairbanks: 474-8050 (Chair's Passcode: 802028)

 

A G E N D A

UAF FACULTY SENATE MEETING #103

Monday, September 24, 2001

1:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Board of Regents' Conference Room

109 Butrovich Building

 

1:30 I Call to Order – Norm Swazo 5 Min.

A. Roll Call

B. Approval of Minutes to Meeting #102

C. Adoption of Agenda

1:35 II Status of Chancellor's Office Actions 5 Min.

A. Motions Approved:

1. Motion to amend Article IV, Section 2 of the Constitution.

2. Motion to approve the Ph.D. degree program in Engineering.

3. Motion to approve the M.S. degree program in Computational Physics.

4. Motion to approve a policy on Graduate Advisory Committees.

5. Motion to approve the A.A.S. in Process Technology.

6. Motion to establish a policy on academic program review and assessment.

7. Motion to amend the Section 3 (Article V: Committees) of the Bylaws by deleting E.4.

8. Motion to adopt a policy statement on Principal Investigator Eligibility.

B. Motions Pending: none

 

1:40 III A. Remarks by Chancellor M. Lind 10 Min.

B. Remarks by Provost P. Reichardt 10 Min.

Summary Report of 2000/2001 Faculty Reviews (Attachment 103/1)

C. Budget Report 5 Min.

2:05 IV Guest Speakers

A. Dana Thomas & Ron Gatterdam, 15 Min.

Accreditation

B. Carol Gold, Faculty Liaison 5 Min.

 

2:25 V Governance Reports

A. ASUAF -D. Miller / GSO - 5 Min.

B. Staff Council - S. McCrea 5 Min.

C. President's Report - N. Swazo 5 Min.

D. President-Elect's Remarks – G. Chukwu 5 Min.

2:45 VI Public Comments/Questions 5 Min.

 

2:50 ***BREAK*** 10 Min

 

3:00 VII New Business 15 Min.

A. Motion to confirm membership on the Ad Hoc Committee on Unit Criteria (Attachment 103/2),

submitted by Administrative Committee

B. Motion to amend the Baccalaureate Core Curriculum including the Philosophy Statement (Attachment 103/3),

submitted by Core Review

 

3:15 VIII Committee Reports 15 Min.

A. Curricular Affairs - R. Illingworth (Attachment 103/4)

B. Faculty Affairs - P. McRoy (Attachment 103/5)

C. Graduate Academic & Advisory Committee – H. Eicken

D. Core Review - J. Brown

E. Curriculum Review - P. Pinney

F. Developmental Studies - J. Weber (Attachment 103/6)

G. Faculty Appeals & Oversight - J. Moessner

(Attachment 103/7)

H. Faculty Development, Assessment & Improvement – D. McLean-Nelson

 

3:30 IX Members' Comments/Questions 5 Min.

 

3:35 X Adjournment

 

*****************************

ATTACHMENT 103/1

UAF FACULTY SENATE #103

SEPTEMBER 24, 2001

 

SUMMARY REPORT OF 2000/2001 FACULTY REVIEWS

Paul Reichardt

 

Promotion/Mandatory Tenure and Mandatory Tenure Only

10 files; 10-yes

7 yes at all stages of review

1 yes at all stages except campuswide committee; additional

information provided to Provost

1 yes at all stages except unit peer committee and director

1 yes at all stages except dean

 

Promotion/Early Tenure and Early Tenure Only

15 files; 13-yes; 2-withdrawn

11 yes at all stages of review

1 yes at all stages except director

1 yes at all stages except campuswide committee; additional information provided to Provost

 

Promotion

21 files; 16-yes; 2-no; 3-withdrawn

14 yes at all stages of review

1 no at all stages of review

1 unit peer committee, dean, director said yes; all subsequent reviewers said no

1 yes by all administrators, no by both peer committees

1 yes at all stages of review except campuswide committee and Provost

 

Pre-Tenure

8 files; all satisfactory

6 S at all stages of review

1 S at all stages except one

1 S at 3 of 5 stages

 

Post-Tenure

42 files; 41-S, 1-U

38 S at all stages

2 S at 3 of 4 stages

1 S at 4 of 5 stages

1 S at 2 of 4 stages

 

Overall, 96 files were submitted for review. Five were withdrawn. Of the

91 which went through the entire review process, 82 received the same

recommendation (81 positive; one negative) at each stage of review.

There were four promotion and tenure cases where the Chancellor’s

decision did not follow the recommendation of the campuswide

committee. In two of these cases substantive information was added to

the files after review by the campuswide committee, and in the other two

cases the votes of the members of the campuswide committee were

pretty evenly split. There was one promotion case in which both peer

committees recommended against promotion (by 2-3 and 3-4 votes), but

all administrators who reviewed the file were in support of the application.

I believe that we continue to make progress in providing useful

information in post-tenure reviews. We seem to be past the days when

administrative reviews simply summarized information on CV’s and some

peer committee reports simply cited the results of a vote. There were a

few cases, however, which provided reminders that we still have some

things to learn about giving and receiving constructive criticism.

 

I also believe that we need to keep an eye on the "early tenure" situation.

In 1999/2000 we had 7 early tenure applications (5 were successful, 2

were withdrawn). In 2000/2001 we had 15 early tenure applications (13

were successful, 2 were withdrawn). I did not keep records of how many

of these applications were submitted in lieu of the 4th-year pre-tenure

review, but there were several each year. Some of these early tenure

applications have been excellent, even spectacular. Some, obviously,

have been deemed premature. The vast majority are from faculty who

are doing very well and give every indication of succeeding here. We

seem to be drifting toward a situation in which we are willing to make the

call on tenure after three or four years instead of five. Is that what we

want? If not, I think the principal responsibility to restore the traditional

6th-year tenure review for most faculty falls to the unit peer committees

(which did, by the way, endorse each of the 15 early tenure applicants

this year). I urge these committees to review how they (equitably and

consistently) apply unit criteria to distinguish between the exceptional

early tenure candidates and those who are simply making good progress

toward tenure.

 

*****************************

ATTACHMENT 103/2

UAF FACULTY SENATE #103

SEPTEMBER 24, 2001

SUBMITTED BY ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE

 

MOTION:

======

The UAF Faculty Senate moves to confirm the membership on the Ad Hoc

Committee on Unit Criteria consisting of one member from each of the

following committees: Curricular Affairs, Faculty Affairs; Faculty

Development, Assessment, and Improvement; and Faculty Appeals &

Oversight Committee.

Gary Holton, Curricular Affairs

Joan Leguard, Faculty Affairs

Debi McLean-Nelson, Faculty Development, Assessment &

Improvement

Julie Riley, Faculty Appeals & Oversight

 

EFFECTIVE: Immediately

 

*****************************

ATTACHMENT 103/3

UAF FACULTY SENATE #103

SEPTEMBER 24, 2001

SUBMITTED BY CORE REVIEW

 

MOTION:

======

The UAF Faculty Senate moves to amend the Baccalaureate Core

Curriculum by adding a General Statement and updating the Philosophy Statement.

 

EFFECTIVE: Immediately

RATIONALE: The updated Philosophy statement has been

open to comment on the CORE web site since January as a

motion to replace the 1990 version.

The Committee was asked to create a basic CORE

statement, which we have done and is also on the web site

as well as in the CORE Notebook.

The Committee feels that replacing the outdated

philosophy statement with this carefully updated

statement is significant to the Accreditation process.

***************

 

PROPOSED GENERAL STATEMENT:

=========================

 

The Baccalaureate Experience

General Statement

 

UAF Core Curriculum Courses

The University of Alaska Fairbanks Baccalaureate Core Curriculum provides

students with a shared foundation of knowledge and skills. Required of all

graduates, the Core introduces students to the content and methodology

of the major areas of knowledge: the humanities and fine arts, the

natural sciences, mathematics, and the social sciences. These

requirements help students develop the mental skills that will make them

more effective participants, both in college and life in general.

Continually reviewed and enriched, the Core offers more than 80 courses

to fulfill degree requirements. Not only does the Core provide students

with a common learning experience, but it also enhances students'

appreciation of cultural diversity and its implications on an individual and a

social basis. Students must complete a minimum of 38 credits to satisfy

the Core requirement:

 

Communications (9 credits)

ENGL 111X Methods of Written Communication (3)

ENGL 211X Intermediate Exposition, with Modes of Literature (3) OR

ENGL 213X Intermediate Exposition (3)

COMM 131X Fundamentals of Oral Communication: Group Context (3) OR

COMM 141X Fundamentals of Oral Communication: Public Context (3).

 

Library Information and Research (0-1 credits)

Successful completion of library skills competency test OR

LS 100X or 101X prior to junior standing

 

Writing- and Oral-Intensive Courses (0 additional credits)

Successful completion of two Writing-Intensive courses designated (W)

and one Oral-Intensive course designated (O) or two oral-communication

courses designated (O/2), at the upper-division level. Please consult the

UAF Catalog to find out which courses are designated (W) and (O).

 

Perspectives on the Human Condition (18 credits)

ANTH 100X OR SOC 100X Individual, Society, and Culture (3)

ECON 100X (3) OR PS 100X Political Economy (3)

HIST 100X Modern World History (3)

ART/MUS/THR 200X Aesthetic Appreciation: Interrelationship of Art,

Drama, and Music (3) OR

HUM 201X Unity in the Arts (3)

ENGL/FL 200X World Literatures (3)

COMM 300X Communicating Ethics (3) OR

JUST 300X Ethics and Justice OR

NRM 303X Environmental Ethics and Actions OR

PS 300X Values and Choices OR

PHIL 322X Ethics

 

OR complete 12 credits from the above courses plus two semester-length

(10 credits) courses in a single Alaska Native language or other non-

English language or three semester-length courses (9 credits) in American

Sign Language taken at the university level.

 

Mathematics (3 credits)

Math 107X Functions for Calculus (3) OR

Math 131X Concepts and Contemporary Application of Mathematics (3) OR

Math 200X, 201X, 202X, 262X, 272X (3), OR any math course having

one of these as a prerequisite.

*Math 161 is not an equivalent course to Math 107X.

 

Natural Sciences (8 credits)

Complete two 4-credit courses, with labs, from approved natural science

core courses with depth or breadth emphasis. Both courses must be

from the same emphasis area, that is, either breadth or depth.

 

Breadth Emphasis

The two courses must be in different natural sciences or must be

interdisciplinary in nature.

Select two courses from the following:

ATM 101X Weather and Climate of Alaska (4)

BIOL 103X Biology and Society (4) OR

BIOL 104X Natural History of Alaska (4) OR

BIOL 273X Human Dimensions of Global Change (4)

CHEM 100X Chemistry and the Modern World (4)

GEOG 205X Physical Geography (4)

GEOS 100X Introduction to Earth Science (4) OR

GEOS 125X Humans, Earth, and Environment (4) OR

GEOS 120X Glaciers, Earthquakes, Volcanoes (4)

MSL 111X The Oceans (4)

PHYS 102X Energy and Society (4) OR

PHYS 175X Astronomy (4)

 

Depth Emphasis

The two courses must be sequential courses or a two-semester survey in

the basic natural sciences (biology, chemistry, earth

science, physics). Select one sequence from the following:

BIOL 105X-106X Fundamentals of Biology I and II (8)

BIOL 211X-212X Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II (8)

CHEM 103X-104X Basic General Chemistry/Beginnings in Biochemistry (8)

CHEM 105X-106X General Chemistry (8)

GEOS 101X and 112X The Dynamic Earth/History of Earth and Life (8)

PHYS 103X-104X College Physics (8)

PHYS 211X-212X General Physics (8)

PHYS 211X and 213X General Physics/Elementary Modern Physics (8)

PHYS 212X-213X General Physics/Elementary Modern Physics (8)

 

 

CURRENT PHILOSOPHY STATEMENT (1990):

================================

The Baccalaureate Experience

The Philosophy

 

The pursuit of the baccalaureate degree in the late twentieth century is a

formidable undertaking. Social change and the knowledge explosion

create new disciplines and alter the conventions, content, methods, and

the applications of existing disciplines. We in higher education have

reacted to this phenomenon by promoting an ever-growing curriculum of

specialized majors, often at the expense of the basic liberal arts

education concept of unity of knowledge as expressed by a common core

of intellectual experiences.

 

As UAF students advance toward a degree goal they, too, encounter an

array of general education and specialized curriculum offerings of the

university. If these encounters are to reflect a clear learning purpose,

then the curriculum must reflect a clearly stated academic philosophy

defining the meaning and purpose of the baccalaureate degree at the

University of Alaska Fairbanks. Formulation of this philosophy starts

directly with this question.

 

What intellectual experiences shall be deemed essential for all UAF

students, regardless of academic major or career aspirations?

On the Conduct of Intellectual Inquiry. The development of the

intellect is a basic aim of the baccalaureate degree. The university

experience must demand more than "recipe knowledge," that is, the rote

learning of material currently held to be "factual" and of the elemental

"mechanics" of applied knowledge. What must be emphasized are

intellectual activities which connect the mental processes of critical

thinking and problem solving, and which explore certain metaphysical

issues in knowledge creation.

 

Problem solving is a constant feature of human existence and we expect a

learned demonstration of an intellectual ability to systematically design

and conduct critical inquiry. To arrive at plausible answers or solutions

requires first having plausible questions—an analysis task built on

abstract conceptualization, logical reasoning, and on the exegesis of

appropriate text material.

 

Finally, the opportunity for synthesizing knowledge must be present. The

ultimate form of knowing is the perception and articulation of the

"pattern"—of the significant relationships among pieces of knowledge.

The synthesizing exercise should stimulate creative work and, hopefully,

the joy of intellectual discovery and accomplishment.

Advanced Literacy in Language and Mathematics. Functional

literacy is not a goal of university education. Regardless of the skill levels

in English and mathematics students bring to the university, they must

experience an educational process that pushes them beyond the

functional to advanced levels.

 

For language literacy this means multi-dimensional competency in the use

of English: 1) the critical comprehension of complex reading material; 2)

the preparation of clear, organized and soundly reasoned statements in a

variety of written forms; and 3) the capability and confidence to orally

participate in public forums.

 

Advanced literacy in mathematics implies a solid grasp of quantitative

reasoning and appreciation of mathematical applications. Most important

is acquiring the knowledge necessary for informed judgement on the uses

of mathematical and statistical interpretations confronting us in everyday

life.

 

Inherent in these advanced literacies is an empowering process.

Achievement of the range of competencies comprising these fields of

study represents real personal power. It is a power, which keys success,

satisfaction and greater self-determination throughout the total academic

experience and in the modern world.

 

The Nature and Use of Science. At its heart, "science," represents a

distinct approach to the study and explanation of both the natural and

social world. College-level work in the sciences should foster an

intellectual comfort with different aspects of the scientific method such

as the quest for objectivity, hypothesis building and testing, and with the

explanatory functions of theory. Facility with quantitative manipulations

and measures associated with basic scientific enterprises is an important

part of this academic process.

 

The student should also become closely acquainted with the larger

intellectual frameworks which have nurtured the development of scientific

thought, including the ways we have come to understand and articulate

the basic concepts of these frameworks. No student, for example, should

graduate without a fundamental understanding of evolutionary theory

because its major assumptions and propositions have triggered

substantial work in virtually every other discipline. Einstein's theory of

relativity is another such framework.

 

While particular emphasis is placed on the scientific approach in its

various forms, adequate attention should be given to other traditions of

human inquiry, both empirical and non-empirical.

 

In modern times, technological developments have had an enormous

impact on all facets of the world's ecosystems, raising philosophical and

ethical questions critical to the making of humane public policy. These

are questions that simply will not go away and should be directly dealt

with in the natural and social science curriculums.

 

Studies in History, Language, and Culture. In one sense, we all are

members of a "global village" because of almost instantaneous

communication networks, speedy transportation systems, and

interlocking world economies. But in another sense, we live in a highly

uncertain and fragmented world comprising a multitude of differing

historical and cultural traditions. We all have a history, which has shaped

the way we define ourselves as cultural, linguistic and national groups.

For the American university, the study of western civilization, including

the culturally pluralistic tradition of America, is an essential prerequisite

to related studies of our contemporary cultural consciousness and major

social institutions. However, we must go beyond this to the comparative

study of non-Western history and culture since it ultimately has the

chance of making more comprehensible international complexities and

certain seemingly intractable conditions such as was, poverty, and

oppression.

 

The comparative study of history and culture also should include content

that forces a critical examination of how the shared images, values, and

convictions of a cultural group directly form the fundamental assumptions

by which people make sense of everyday life and of the world around

them. This kind of intellectual journey will raise many issues about values

formation, the power of cultural identity, and the sources of

ethnocentrism. The most sanguine presumption is that at journey's end,

there will be more than mere tolerance for cultural differences. Rather,

there will emerge a solid understanding and appreciation for different

cultural traditions, and the way history has mixed many of these

traditions into multicultural societies.

 

Finally, there exists one other literacy pertinent to being an educated

citizen of the modern world—the development of a basic competence in a

foreign or non-English language. Together with the pure intellectual

benefits of the learning exercise (and there are many), facility in a second

language opens a very large window to real experiences in different

cultural realities.

 

Humanistic Expressions. It is the humanistic study of aesthetics,

literature, and ideas, which reveal the full meaning of being human.

Unfortunately, it is precisely the humanities, which the modern

technocratic world view has most de-emphasized. Nowhere else in the

curriculum are the human senses and emotions so completely engaged as

in the study of literature, the visual and performing arts, and philosophic

discourse.

 

Moreover, humanistic expressions are cultural products vividly portraying

the salient realities of a particular people at a particular time. For

example, the prose and poetry of a historical period can bring the human

condition to life in ways the literal style of textbooks cannot. It is in this

realm of learning that beauty, creativity, and the powers of the human

imagination and intellect are most directly encountered and shared

through time and space.

 

Within this domain, the question of values becomes significant. Much of

everyday life is spent dealing with value ambiguity. People continually

must make decisions within multiple environments loaded with conflicting

moral possibilities. Then they must bear responsibility for the

consequences of their decisions. Through enculturation people develop a

set of principles to guide the making of these real-life choices. These

principles—and everybody has them and uses them constantly—reflect

the core values and moral standards each of us believe we live by (or try

to live by).

 

Enculturation, hence value formation, derives collectively from the ethos

of those social institutions in which people spend good portions of their

lives—the family, the church, peer groups, and schools, including the

university. At a university, students should directly confront the nature

of values.

 

The cultural values of society—of humankind—are for learning and for

debating. The ultimate benefit of this exercise depends on the way we

use it to reflect upon and refine our own personal codes of conduct.

Content Concentration. Intellectual concentration in a specific

discipline serves as conceptual anchor to the baccalaureate experience

and as the professional foundation of the student's post-baccalaureate

career. The major field or area of specialization is where we expect the

intellectual development of a solid grounding in a defined body of

knowledge. Instruction in the advanced aspects of the field is an integral

part of this undertaking; but full understanding is not gained without

directed independent study and synthesizing activities. Also, each

specialized field of study should examine the ethics and values associated

with the application of its methods and knowledge.

 

 

PROPOSED PHILOSOPHY STATEMENT (2001):

=================================

The UAF Baccalaureate Experience

The Philosophy

 

The pursuit of the baccalaureate degree in the twenty-first century is a

formidable undertaking. Social change and the knowledge explosion

create new disciplines and alter the conventions, content, methods, and

the applications of existing disciplines. We in higher education have

reacted to these phenomena by promoting an ever-growing curriculum of

specialized majors, often at the expense of the basic liberal arts

education concept of unity of knowledge as expressed by a common core

of intellectual experiences.

 

As UAF students advance toward a degree goal they, too, encounter an

array of general education and specialized curriculum offerings of the

University. In order to assure that the baccalaureate experience of all

University of Alaska Fairbanks students reflects the academic philosophy

of a liberal education, the University has created a core curriculum. The

core curriculum is designed to include the intellectual experiences

considered essential for all UAF students, regardless of academic major or

career aspirations.

 

The Core Curriculum will be sustained in quality through an on-going

process of student learning outcomes assessment. The assessment will

be conducted and reported by the Core Review Committee of the Faculty

Senate, according to the plan approved by the Faculty Senate.

On the Conduct of Intellectual Inquiry. The development of the

intellect is a basic aim of the baccalaureate degree. The university

experience must demand more than the rote learning of material currently

held to be "factual" and of the elemental "mechanics" of applied

knowledge. What must be emphasized are intellectual activities which

connect the mental processes of critical thinking and problem solving, and

which explore certain metaphysical issues in knowledge creation.

Problem solving is a constant feature of human existence and we expect a

learned demonstration of an intellectual ability to systematically design

and conduct critical inquiry. To arrive at plausible answers or solutions

requires first having plausible questions—an analysis task built on

abstract conceptualization, logical reasoning, and on the exegesis of

appropriate text material.

 

Finally, the opportunity for synthesizing knowledge must be present. The

ultimate form of knowing is the perception and articulation of the

"pattern"—of the significant relationships among pieces of knowledge.

The synthesizing exercise should stimulate creative work and, hopefully,

the joy of intellectual discovery and accomplishment.

 

Advanced Literacy in Language and Mathematics. Functional

literacy is not, in itself, a goal of university education. Regardless of the

skill levels in English and Mathematics students bring to the university,

they must experience an educational process that pushes them beyond

the functional to advanced levels.

For language literacy this means multi-dimensional competency in the use

of English: 1) the critical comprehension of complex reading material; 2)

the preparation of clear, organized and soundly reasoned statements in a

variety of written forms; and 3) the capability and confidence to

competently participate orally and aurally in public forums.

Advanced literacy in mathematics implies a solid grasp of quantitative

reasoning and appreciation of mathematical applications. Most important

is acquiring the knowledge necessary for informed judgement on the uses

of mathematical and statistical interpretations confronting us in everyday

life.

 

Inherent in these advanced literacies is an empowering process.

Achievement of the range of competencies comprising these fields of

study represents real personal power. It is a power which keys success,

satisfaction, and greater self-determination throughout the total

academic experience and in the contemporary world.

 

The Nature and Use of Science. At its heart, "science," represents

distinct approaches to the study, explanation, and understanding of both

the natural and social worlds. College-level work in the sciences should

foster an intellectual comfort with different scientific methods and with

the scientific functions of theory. Facility with the quantitative

manipulations and measures associated with basic natural and social

scientific enterprises is an important part of this academic process as is

recognition of the qualitative approaches of human science.

The student should also become closely acquainted with the larger

intellectual frameworks which have nurtured the development of scientific

thought, including the ways we have come to understand and articulate

the basic concepts of these frameworks. Examples of such frameworks

are Einstein's theory of relativity and evolutionary theory.

While particular emphasis is placed on scientific approaches, adequate

attention should be given to other traditions of human inquiry, both

empirical and non-empirical.

In contemporary times, technological developments have had an

enormous impact on all facets of the world's ecosystems, raising

philosophical and ethical questions critical to the making of humane public

policy. These are questions that simply will not go away and should

continue to be dealt with directly in the natural, social, and human science

curriculums.

 

Studies in History, Language, and Culture. In one sense, we all are

members of a "global village" because of almost instantaneous

communication networks, speedy transportation systems, and

interlocking world economies. But in another sense, we live in a highly

uncertain and fragmented world comprising a multitude of differing

historical and cultural traditions. We all have a history, which has shaped

the way we define ourselves as cultural, linguistic, and national groups.

For the American university, the study of western civilization, including

the culturally pluralistic tradition of America, is an essential prerequisite

to related studies of our contemporary cultural consciousness and major

social institutions. However, we must go beyond this to the comparative

study of non-Western history and culture since it ultimately has the

chance of making more comprehensible international complexities and

certain seemingly intractable conditions such as was, poverty, and

oppression.

 

The comparative study of history and culture also should include content

that forces a critical examination of how the shared images, values, and

convictions of a cultural group directly form the fundamental assumptions

by which people make sense of everyday life and of the world around

them. This kind of intellectual journey will raise many issues about values

formation, the power of cultural identity, and the sources of

ethnocentrism. The most sanguine

presumption is that at journey's end, there will be more than mere

tolerance for cultural differences. Rather, there will emerge a solid

understanding and appreciation for different cultural traditions and the

ways that exposure to cultural differences can add to and enhance our

everyday lives.

 

Finally, there exists one other literacy pertinent to being an educated

citizen of the contemporary world—the development of a basic

competence in a foreign or non-English language. Together with the pure

intellectual benefits of the learning exercise (and there are many), facility

in a second language opens a very large window to real experiences in

different cultural realities. UAF students should be encouraged to

recognize both the personal and professional benefits of speaking and

reading other languages.

 

Humanistic Expressions. It is the humanistic study of aesthetics,

literature, and ideas, which reveal the full meaning of being human.

Unfortunately, it is precisely the humanities, which the technocratic world

view has most de-emphasized. Nowhere else in the curriculum are the

human senses and emotions so completely engaged as in the study of

literature, the visual and performing arts, and philosophic discourse.

Moreover, humanistic expressions are cultural products vividly portraying

the salient realities of a particular people at a particular time. For

example, the prose and poetry of a historical period can bring the human

condition to life in ways the literal style of textbooks cannot. It is in this

realm of learning that beauty, creativity, and the powers of the human

imagination and intellect are most directly encountered and shared

through time.

 

Within this domain, the question of values becomes significant. Much of

everyday life is spent dealing with value ambiguity. People continually

must make decisions within multiple environments loaded with conflicting

moral possibilities. Then they must bear responsibility for the

consequences of their decisions. Through enculturation people develop a

set of principles to guide the making of these real-life choices. These

principles—and everybody has them and uses them constantly—reflect

the core values and moral standards each of us believe we live by (or try

to live by).

 

Enculturation, hence value formation, derives collectively from the ethos

of those social institutions in which people spend good portions of their

lives—the family, the church, peer groups, and schools, including the

University. At UAF, students should directly confront the nature of

values in their baccalaureate experience.

 

The cultural values of society—of humankind—are for learning and for

debating. The ultimate benefit of this exercise depends on the way we

use it to reflect upon and refine our own personal codes of conduct.

Content Concentration. Intellectual concentration in a specific

discipline serves as conceptual anchor to the baccalaureate experience

and as the professional foundation of the student's post-baccalaureate

career. The major field or area of specialization is where we expect the

intellectual development of a solid grounding in a defined body of

knowledge. Instruction in the advanced aspects of the field is an integral

part of this undertaking; but full understanding is not gained without

directed independent study and synthesizing activities. Also, each

specialized field of study should examine the ethics and values associated

with the application of its methods and knowledge.

 

*****************************

ATTACHMENT 103/4

UAF FACULTY SENATE #103

SEPTEMBER 24, 2001

SUBMITTED BY CURRICULAR AFFAIRS

 

Curricular Affairs Committee Meeting Report

 

The Curricular Affairs committee held its first audioconferenced meeting

of the academic year on 6 Sept, 2001 from 1-2 pm. Members present

included Mike Hannigan, Wanda Martin, Peter Pinney, Eduard Zilberkant,

Carol Barnhardt, James Gladden, Gary Holton, David Woodall, and Ron

Illingworth.

 

All meetings will be audioconferenced as well as face to face as some

members of the committee are from outside Fairbanks.

 

The committee discussed known issues and items of business which will

need to be dealt with this semester as well as personal schedules. The

following meeting schedule was determined.

 

Date Time

19 Sept, 2001 3:30-4:45 pm

3 Oct, 2001 3:30-4:45 pm

17 Oct, 2001 3:30-4:45 pm

7 Nov, 2001 3:30-4:45 pm

21 Nov, 2001 3:30-4:45 pm

5 Dec, 2001 3:30-4:45 pm

 

Gary Holton volunteered to represent the Curricular Affairs committee on

the Faculty Senate ad hoc committee for SOEd unit criteria.

The committee reviewed our charge as shown in the Senate Bylaws and

members were advised of the upcoming schedule for curricular changes

(new degrees and courses, etc). All new degrees, new courses, minor

course changes, and program deletions must be completed through the

unit curricular process and forwarded to the Faculty Senate by October

26, 2001. Additionally, new programs and program deletions can only be

approved during the Fall semester in order to meet BOR timing

preferences.

 

Respectfully submitted

Ronald D. Illingworth, Chair

Curricular Affairs Committee

 

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ATTACHMENT 103/5

UAF FACULTY SENATE #103

SEPTEMBER 24, 2001

SUBMITTED BY FACULTY AFFAIRS

 

FACULTY AFFAIRS MEETING REPORT

Date: 17 September 01 Begin: 1300 hrs

Committee Members Present:

M. Davis, J. Leguard, C.P. McRoy (chair) and R. Smith

Others Present:

N. Swazo

 

The Faculty Affairs committee will meet the 2nd Monday of the month

(except December–first Monday) at 1300.

 

Old Business:

1. Classified Research

Classified research on the UAF campus became an issue last semester

with a proposal from the Geophysical Institute. The Provost has approved

such research but there are several issues affecting students and faculty

that could pose problems and should be examined. This will be a

developing issue for the Faculty Senate.

 

2. Regulation on Research Misconduct

The scope of this issue was presented to other governance body

representatives last spring. A draft policy prepared by N. Swazo is in

review and will be forwarded to the Senate through the Faculty Affairs

Committee.

 

3. UAF Budget Process

Last spring Faculty Affairs forwarded a motion to the Senate that was

viewed as a first step in becoming more involved in the UAF budget

process. In this context, we discussed an issue presented at a Provost’s

Council meeting in July, VC Williams presented one solution to the

recovery of real overhead costs on grants. The Faculty Affairs

Committee after some discussion thought the solution to the problem to

be one of punishment rather than rewards and will seek other methods of

resolution of the problem.

 

New Business

1. Ad Hoc Committee on Unit Criteria

This committee is being appointed to review the unit criteria from the

School of Education. J. Leguard will participate for Faculty Affairs.

 

2. Revision of Emeritus Status Policy

This policy was revised by the BOR in the February 2001 meeting. The

revision requires a revision of UAF regulation w/r to Emeritus status. The

Faculty Affairs Committee finds that the BOR revision fails to recognize

research faculty and their directors. A revision is in process.

 

3. Spouse Appointment Policy

There is no known policy regarding spouse appointments. Does UAF need

a policy? State of Alaska ethics statues apparently require that spouses

working on a grant must be on an equal status. Faculty Affairs will

investigate this issue.

 

4. Regulation regarding governance

A draft of university regulation 03.01.010 regarding faculty, staff and

student governance from Staff Alliance was forwarded to Faculty Affairs

review. This has been circulated to the Committee for comments and will

be brought to the Senate at the October meeting.

 

5. Search process for statewide VP for Research

Faculty Affairs notes that one of the three candidates for this position

was unable to visit campus for interviews. Although this candidate

interviewed for another position earlier in the year this did not meet the

needs of faculty interviews for the present position. The Committee

recommends that the Senate remind the President that the faculty

consider this an unfortunate gap in the search process, that such

administrators are here on behalf of the faculty and students and that the

latter have every intent of reviewing, criticizing, commenting,

evaluating, and passing judgment on their actions.

 

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ATTACHMENT 103/6

UAF FACULTY SENATE #103

SEPTEMBER 24, 2001

SUBMITTED BY DEVELOPMENTAL STUDIES

 

Minutes of The Developmental Studies Committee

September 18, 2001 - 1:00-2:00pm

Chancellor's Conference Room

 

Present: Barbara Adams, Nancy Ayagarak, John Bruder, Rich Carr, Marty

Getz, Cindy Hardy, Marjie Illingworth, Ron Illingworth, Gary Larsen, Wanda

Martin, Joe Mason, Greg Owens, Jane Weber.

 

The Committee met and discussed the following items:

Accreditation:

Jane handed out copies of the section of the accreditation report that

addresses Developmental programs. The accreditors will be visiting the

rural sites on October 4-5 and the urban campuses on October 8-10.

Faculty should be prepared to answer questions from the accreditors

when they visit. The Provost will hold a briefing Thursday, September 20

for department chairs and program coordinators.

 

FY 03 Initiative:

Wanda reported that, after review and prioritization, the MAUs were told

to revise and focus the initiatives so that they fit with other initiatives

going forward. The Learning Assistance Center initiative is now one of

three components in a draft developed by Carla Kirts, along with the

EDGE program and Peer Advising for RSS. As a result of her work, the

proposed funding has been increased, though approval on the initiatives is

not yet final.

 

We will need to submit a further initiative for the FY 04 cycle. Paul

Reichardt suggests submitting further initiatives, since we will not know

what's been funded for the FY03 process before the deadline for FY 04.

He's also indicated that the funding for FY04 initiatives will be lower that

for FY02 or FY03. We will include our response to Hamilton's challenge to

us in this initiative. We also will seek out and incorporate ideas from

others on other campuses. We have set a date to have a working

meeting, inviting those involved with Developmental programs who are

not on the committee to meet with us to gather ideas that we can refine

into an initiative. This open forum will meet September 27, at 1pm.

 

Update on the Outside Review of Developmental Programs:

Maynard Perkins has agreed to facilitate this review, which will provide an

outside perspective on the needs and direction of Developmental

programs UAF-wide. This is the first stage of a process proposed by Jake

Poole, TVC Director, which will lend support to the initiatives and

proposals put forward by this committee and other Developmental faculty

and coordinators. Perkins will choose the reviewers both from a list of

interested reviewers Marjie has compiled of NADE contacts and from a list

he is developing separately. This process will not begin until the

accreditation visits are over.

 

New projects for this year:

Ron reports that Institutional Research has volunteered to generate data

for us if we provide them with questions. We need to decide what kind

of data we want to collect and what we want to know from this data.

Wanda reports that COMPASS has been updated, particularly in the Math

section so that it is set for a maximum number of items. Low students

are now given a diagnostic 1-page printout rather than simply being

referred to ALPA. In addition, more demographics have been added,

which will help those students enrolled in programs linked to special

qualifications (i.e.: single-parent, etc.).

 

Wanda also reports that it is possible through the Early Warning program

to run more reports that will help departments extend outreach to and

communicate with their students who are at risk.

 

Fall meeting times:

Thursday, September 27, 1 p.m. (Open forum/work session on FY04

Initiative)

Thursday, October 25, 1 p.m.

Thursday, November 29, 1 p.m.

Thursday, December 6, 1 p.m.

 

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ATTACHMENT 103/7

UAF FACULTY SENATE #103

SEPTEMBER 24, 2001

SUBMITTED BY FACULTY APPEALS AND OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE

 

Minutes of the Meeting on September 13, 2001

 

Members Present: Mitch Roth, Glenn Juday, Jerry Lipka, Julie Riley,

Victoria Moessner (Chair)

Members Absent: Brian Himelbloom, Oscar Kawagley, Michael Schuldiner

Others Present: Godwin Chukwu

 

Old business:

The committee discussed the need to fill the eight vacancies on the

Committee.

Mitch Roth will be co-chair until December 31, and Glenn Juday will be co-

chair from January 1 to May.

 

New business:

Julie Riley will serve on the Unit Criteria Committee of the School of

Education.

Godwin went through the purpose of the Appeals and Oversight

Committee and the guidelines under which the Committee works.

Procedures are now in place and there are two administrators who are to

be evaluated this year.

 

The next meeting of the Committee will be October 10 from 2-3.