The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting #141 on February 5, 2007

MOTION: 
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The UAF Faculty Senate moves to define academic credit for practicum, internship, or scholarly activity as follows (2006-2007 UAF Catalog, page 221): 

[[   ]]  - Deletion
CAPS - Addition

COURSE CREDITS

One credit represents satisfactory completion of 800 minutes of lecture or 1600 or 2400 minutes of laboratory (OR STUDIO OR OTHER SIMILAR ACTIVITY), whichever is appropriate. (IT IS UNDERSTOOD THAT AN AVERAGE STUDENT WILL BE EXPECTED TO SPEND 1600 MINUTES OF STUDY AND PREPARATION OUTSIDE OF CLASS IN ORDER TO MEET THE LEARNING OBJECTIVES FOR THE UNIT OF CREDIT IN LECTURE.) 

THE FOLLOWING STANDARDS ESTABLISH THE MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS FOR AN ACADEMIC UNIT OF CREDIT: 

  1. 800 MINUTES OF LECTURE (PLUS 1600 MINUTES OF STUDY)
  2. 1600 OR 2400 MINUTES OF LABORATORY (OR STUDIO OR OTHER SIMILAR ACTIVITY)
  3. 2400 - 4800 MINUTES OF SUPERVISED PRACTICUM
  4. 2400 - 8000 MINUTES OF INTERNSHIP (OR EXTERNSHIP, CLINICAL)
  5. 2400 - 4800 MINUTES OF SUPERVISED SCHOLARLY ACTIVITY

Credit hours may not be divided, except one-half credit hours may be granted at the appropriate rate.  For short courses and classes of less than one semester in duration, course hours may not be compressed into fewer than three days per credit.  Any course compressed into fewer than six weeks must be approved by the college or school's curriculum council.  Furthermore, any core course compressed to less than six weeks must be approved by the core review committee. 

            Following the title of each course, the number of credits is listed for each semester.  Thus "3 credits" means three credits may be earned.  Credit may not be given more than once for a course unless a course has been designated as repeatable for credit.  Figures in parentheses at the end of course descriptions indicate the number of lecture; [[and]] laboratory; AND PRACTICUM, INTERNSHIP, OR SCHOLARLY ACTIVITY  hours the class meets each week for one semester.  The first, lecture hours; the second, laboratory, AND THE THIRD PRACTICUM, INTERNSHIP OR SCHOLARLY ACTIVITY.  For example (2+3) indicates that a class has two hours of lecture and three of laboratory work each week.  A DESIGNATION (1 + 0 + 6) INDICATES THAT THE COURSE MEETS FOR ONE HOUR EACH WEEK OF LECTURE AND 6 HOURS EACH WEEK OF PRACTICUM, INTERNSHIP OR OTHER SCHOLARLY ACTIVITY.

              EFFECTIVE:              Fall 2007

RATIONALE:           With an increased number of programs requiring supervised work experiences prior to graduation, often to meet national standards, it has become important to establish some guidelines for awarding credit for these learning experiences outside of the traditional classroom.  The guidelines proposed are broad as is the terminology (internship, externship, scholarly activity) so they may encompass the variety of traditions and requirements in individual fields of study, as well as requirements of external accrediting agencies (NCATE, CAAHEP, etc.)

 

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The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting #141 on February 5, 2007:

MOTION:
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The UAF Faculty Senate moves to amend the Residency Requirements for the Baccalaureate degree (2006-2007 UAF Catalog, p. 112). 

CAPS = additions
[[   ]]   = deletions

How to Earn a Baccalaureate Degree

General University Requirements (p. 112)

For a UAF bachelor's degree, you need at least 120 semester credits, including transfer credits.  Of these, 39 credits must be upper-division (300-level or above) OF WHICH 24 MUST BE UA RESIDENCE CREDITS AND 15 MUST BE UAF CREDITS.

At least 30 semester credits applicable to any baccalaureate degree must be earned at UAF.  Transfer students need to earn at least 24 upper-division semester credits at UA OF WHICH 15 MUST BE UAF CREDITS.  TRANSFER STUDENTS MUST EARN at least 12 semester credits in the major and at least 3 semester credits in the minor. 

Table 19  General University Requirements for Baccalaureate Degrees  

Minimum number of credits required

120 credits

Credits earned at UAF (residence credit)

30 credits

Upper -division credit (courses with numbers between 300 and 499)

39 credits total (some degrees require more); 24 of the 39 must be earned at UA AND 15 AT UAF

Additional UAF credit that must be earned by transfer students

12 credits in the major; 3 credits in the minor

Grade point average required

2.0 cumulative and in major and minor

Minimum grades required for major

No grade lower than C(2.0) in courses required for major

Catalog year that can be used to determine  requirements

May use any catalog in effect when enrolled as a degree-seeking student, regardless of major; seven-year limit on catalog year

Second degree requirements

24 credits beyond the first baccalaureate degree and all requirements for the second degree must be met

              EFFECTIVE:              Fall 2007

RATIONALE:          The purpose of the proposed change is to allow more flexibility for students transferring between MAUs of the University of Alaska. 

 

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The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting #141 on February 5, 2007

MOTION:
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The UAF Faculty Senate moves to approve a Certificate in Power Generation. 

       EFFECTIVE:              Fall 2007 and/or Upon Board of Regents approval

RATIONALE:           See course proposals #126-129 and full program proposal #130 from the Fall 2006 review cycle on file in the Governance Office, 312 Signers' Hall.

Program is composed of general certificate requirements and 29 credits in PGEN, PRT and WMT courses for a total of 38 credits

 

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Statement of Proposed Program: 

The power generation program will help students develop entry-level skills needed in industrial and commercial electrical power generation and maintenance.  Courses combine the technical know-how and hands-on experience necessary to develop entry level workers in a variety of power generation and industrial fields. In the classroom students will become familiar with the operation and maintenance of the standard equipment encountered in the power generation industry.

Proposed General Catalog Layout

Certificate Program Power Generation                                            

  1. Complete the general university degree requirements (page 80)
  2. Complete the certificate requirements (page 82)
  3. Complete the following program requirements:

PGEN 101 – Intro to Power Generation, Distribution & Alternative Energy …3
PGEN 102- Basic Electricity for Power Generation Operators .. . .  . . . . . . . . . 4
PGEN 103 – Introduction to Power Generation: Maintenance…………. . . . …4
>PGEN 104 – Gas & Steam Turbines; Co-Generation and Combined Cycle Technologies...4
PRT 110 – Introduction to Occupational Safety,
                   Health and Environmental Awareness…………………. . . . . . . ….3
PRT 120 – Water Quality Management for Process Industries. . .……………...4
PRT 140 – Industrial Process Instrumentation I. . .……………………………..3
WMT 101 – Introduction to Welding . . ………………………………………..4

4.   Minimum credits required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

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University of Alaska Board of Regents

Program Approval Summary Form

MAU:  UAF – TVC/CRA

Title:        Power Generation

Target admission date:             Fall 2007        

How does the program relate to the Education mission of the University of Alaska and the MAU?

TVC has long had a concentration in power generation under the former Maintenance Technology degree. In addressing emerging needs in Fairbanks and Interior Alaska, TVC’s Process Technology advisory committee and academic leadership identified the need to expand this to a certificate program meeting high-growth, high-demand job requirements. The advisory committee is comprised of representatives from the various industries and businesses within the Interior who work closely with the Process Technology program to identify the needs for this program. In surveying these members, it became clear that the practice for filling vacant power generation positions within Alaska was to hire from Outside. By offering this program locally, in conjunction with a current articulation agreement with the Operators Local Union #302, industry partners will no longer need to go outside the State of Alaska to fill these positions and we will be meeting our mission of training Alaskans for Alaska’s jobs.

The proposed 38-credit Certificate in Power Generation will enable the University to fulfill its mission through advancing and disseminating knowledge of commercial and industrial type power generation practices by creative teaching to diverse people.  Specifically, courses will be coordinated across multiple MAUs and offered through a variety of instructional methods consistent with current accredited teaching and delivery methodologies, practices and standards.   The content of the courses is relevant to the power generation field and consistent with current national standards as reviewed by the Center for the Advancement of Process Technology (CAPT) and Alaska Process Industry Careers Consortium, with core content building towards the Operating Engineers Journeyman rating.

Currently, there will be no impact on existing programs and units across MAU and system, including GERs.

What State Needs met by this program.

It is important for Alaska business and industry to provide safe automated working environments for all workers in Alaska.  This provision creates less injury in the workplace which in turn equates to quality life experiences, as it reduces insurance costs and costs in remedial education retraining and costly social services later in life. The quality and existence of the safe automated working environment is directly linked to the education of the skilled technician as the individual responsible for calibration and set-up of highly technical, sensitive monitoring and control equipment. More automated systems are implemented daily throughout the state of Alaska and these automated industries and systems require highly trained and skilled individuals.  Research has shown that education of power generation technicians reduces the level of equipment damage and injury as well as reducing the number accidents that occur in the workplace.

It is in the best fiscal interests of the state to have high quality programs and training in power generation, maintenance, calibration and set-up of fully automated industrial power generation systems. 

There is currently a shortage of qualified power generation operators and maintenance technicians and managers in the state of Alaska.  Industry growth and natural resource development in the state increases the number of working environments which will in turn increase demand and employment opportunities, for qualified power generation operators and power generation maintenance technicians.

What are the Student opportunities and outcomes?  Enrollment projections?

The UAF certificate in power generation was requested by the industries in the interior region.  The initial promotion of the program was proposed by the Golden Valley Electric Association (GVEA) and the Operating Engineers Local 302. Many of the current students of the proposed certificate want greater knowledge in this field, and in many cases it is required for their jobs.  Since there is no relevant degree or certificate/training program available here, they go to Valdez or out of state, seek a less satisfying degree or training or change careers completely, or leave the university with unfulfilled career aspirations unprepared for the more challenging positions in the power generation profession.

Based on current needs, industry growth and projections Alaska will continue to suffer shortages in the workforce in all sectors including power generation technicians and related positions.

National surveys provided by CAPT indicate shortages in power generation operators and power generation maintenance professionals in all industries on a national scale. Operating Engineers Local 302 has also indicated that training individuals in conjunction with UAF to enter their ranks as a means of meeting the needs of industry, by addressing both attrition and industry expansion. 

Alaska has high potential for workforce expansion.  According to the Alaska State Department of Labor, there are nearly 10,000 new jobs in industry settings being developed with known projected projects in the state.  All of these industries will require power generation maintenance technicians to monitor, regulate, and calibrate and automated systems for Alaska's power generation industries.

With the trends in the profession for the last 30 years, the new automation systems within industry identified by industry and the Department of Labor indicate a well established need now, and for the foreseeable future, for trained power generation operators and power generation maintenance technicians.  With the aging workforce and projected industry growth and development the need for additional trained power generation operators has never been more urgent. 

Describe Research opportunities:

        N/A

Describe Fiscal Plan for development and implementation:

Three year funding for the project is coming from the USDOL Project Northern Wave Grant (Fast Track Training).  By developing this program over the 3 year grant period we will be building capacity. We anticipate the program to be self-sustaining through student tuition, industry partner support and general fund money through the Process Technology Program, which shares courses and adjuncts with the Power Generation Program.