The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting # 140 on December 11, 2006:

MOTION: 
=======

The UAF Faculty Senate moves to require general studies students with 75 or more earned credits to declare a major prior to registration.

EFFECTIVE:              Fall 2008

RATIONALE:              Encouraging students to declare a major as soon as possible is believed to improve retention and graduation rates (see, for example, www.pellinstitute.org/graduates/Pell_Web.pdf).  General studies students at UAF, those baccalaureate degree seeking students who have not declared a major, have the lowest retention rate at our institution. 139 out of the 523 (27%) first time full time baccalaureate seeking freshmen were general studies students fall semester 2005.  While advisors generally encourage students to select a major, many students do not do so in a timely fashion. In 2005-06 UAF had 44 general studies students with more than 90 credits and 111 with more than 60 credits.  It is not uncommon for general studies students with more than 120 credits to request interdisciplinary undergraduate degrees based upon what they have taken rather than pursuing some well thought-out curriculum.  The intent of this motion is to reduce time to degree and raise graduation rates by pushing students into selecting a major so they have a clear idea of what will be required of them to complete a degree.  The motion does not distinguish between developmental and non developmental course credits.  No change in the ability of students to change their major is proposed.  New transfer students with more than 45 credits would have 30 credit hours, approximately two semesters, to select a major.  This motion does not impact full time students who are officially non degree seeking but are clearly enrolled in courses related to specific degree programs.

 

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The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting # #140 on December 11, 2006:

MOTION:
=======

The UAF Faculty Senate moves to approve the deletion of the M.S. in Botany degree. 

            EFFECTIVE:              Fall 2007 and/or Upon Board of Regents' Approval.

            RATIONALE:             See full program proposal #12 from the Fall 2006 review cycle on file in the                         Governance Office, 312 Signers' Hall.

UAF offers a M.S. in Biology, which is an adequate alternative to the M.S. in Botany, only four students are enrolled in the program.


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The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting # #140 on December 11, 2006:

MOTION:
=======

The UAF Faculty Senate moves to approve the deletion of the M.S. in Zoology degree. 

            EFFECTIVE:              Fall 2007 and/or Upon Board of Regents' Approval.

            RATIONALE:             See full program proposal #13 from the Fall 2006 review cycle on file in the                         Governance Office, 312 Signers' Hall.

UAF offers a M.S. in Biology, which is an adequate alternative to the M.S. in Zoology, only one student is enrolled in the program.


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The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting # #140 on December 11, 2006:

MOTION:
=======

The UAF Faculty Senate moves to approve a M.F.A /M.A. in Creative Writing and Literature degree program.   

EFFECTIVE:              Fall 2007

RATIONALE:             See full program proposal #1 from the Fall 2006 review cycle on file in the Governance Office, 312 Signers' Hall.

Allow a student to acquire the MFA/MA in Creative Writing and Literature by taking 30 required credits for the MA in Literature, plus taking 15 additional credits to fulfill the 45 credit requirement for the MFA in Creative Writing.

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MFA/MA Summary

The M.F.A./M.A. in creative writing and literature combines the M.A. in literature and the M.F.A. in creative writing, both of which are currently offered by English Department faculty.  We propose that the student be permitted to acquire the M.F.A./M.A. in creative writing and literature by taking the 30 credits required for the M.A. in literature, and then taking the 15 additional specified credits which (when added to the 30 credits for the M.A.) would also fulfill the 45 credit course requirements for the M.F.A. in creative writing.  The M.F.A./M.A. will also require comprehensive examinations, a thesis, and an oral defense of thesis. 

The M.F.A./M.A. in creative writing and literature is not a separate degree.  It is a combination of two degrees offered by the English Department, the M.F.A. in creative writing and the M.A. in literature.  The M.F.A./M.A. is similar to the UAF undergraduate double-major which allows a student to acquire, for example, a B.A. in literature and history by filling the requirements for both degrees, and allowing double counting of common degree requirements. 

 

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The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting # #140 on December 11, 2006:

MOTION:
=======

The UAF Faculty Senate moves to approve the Unit Criteria for the Department of Foreign Languages & Literature. 

              EFFECTIVE:              Immediately, Upon Chancellor Approval

RATIONALE:             The committee assessed the unit criteria submitted by the Department of Foreign Languages & Literature. With some changes, agreed upon by the college representative, the unit criteria were found to be consistent with UAF guidelines.

 

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UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA FAIRBANKS

REGULATIONS FOR THE

APPOINTMENT AND EVALUATION OF FACULTY

AND

DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES & LITERATURES UNIT CRITERIA STANDARDS AND INDICES

THE FOLLOWING IS AN ADAPTATION OF UAF AND REGENTS CRITERIA FOR PROMOTION AND TENURE, SPECIFICALLY DEVELOPED FOR USE IN EVALUATING THE FACULTY IN THE DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES. ITEMS IN BOLDFACE ITALICS ARE THOSE SPECIFICALLY ADDED OR EMPHASIZED BECAUSE OF THEIR RELEVANCE TO THE DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES FACULTY, AND BECAUSE THEY ARE ADDITIONS TO AND CLARIFICATION OF UAF REGULATIONS. THESE UNIT CRITERIA ARE FOR USE IN THE ANNUAL EVALUATION OF FACULTY AS WELL.

CHAPTER I

Purview

The University of Alaska Fairbanks document, “Faculty Appointment and Evaluation Policies,” supplements the Board of Regents (BOR) policies and describes the purpose, conditions, eligibility, and other specifications relating to the evaluation of faculty at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF). Contained herein are regulations and procedures to guide the evaluation processes and to identify the bodies of review appropriate for the university.

The university, through the UAF Faculty Senate, may change or amend these regulations and procedures from time to time and will provide adequate notice in making changes and amendments.

These regulations shall apply to all of the units within the University of Alaska Fairbanks, except in so far as extant collective bargaining agreements apply otherwise.

The provost is responsible for coordination and implementation of matters relating to procedures stated herein.

CHAPTER II

Initial Appointment of Faculty

A. Criteria for Initial Appointment

Minimum degree, experience and performance requirements are set forth in “UAF Faculty Appointment and Evaluation Policies,” Chapter IV. Exceptions to these requirements for initial placement in academic rank or special academic rank positions shall be submitted to the chancellor or chancellor’s designee for approval prior to a final selection decision.

B. Academic Titles

Academic titles must reflect the discipline in which the faculty are appointed.

C. Process for Appointment of Faculty with Academic Rank

Deans of schools and colleges, and directors when appropriate, in conjunction with the faculty in a unit, shall observe procedures for advertisement, review, and selection of candidates to fill any vacant faculty position. These procedures are set by UAF Human Resources and the Campus Diversity and Compliance (AA/EEO) office and shall provide for participation in hiring by faculty and administrators as a unit.

D. Process for Appointment of Faculty with Special Academic Rank

Deans and/or directors, in conjunction with the faculty in a unit, shall establish procedures for advertisement, review, and selection of candidates to fill any faculty positions as they become available. Such procedures shall be consistent with the university’s stated AA/EEO policies and shall provide for participation in hiring by faculty and administrators in the unit.

E. Following the Selection Process

The dean or director shall appoint the new faculty member and advise him/her of the conditions, benefits, and obligations of the position. If the appointment is to be at the professor level, the dean/director must first obtain the concurrence of the chancellor or chancellor’s designee.

F. Letter of Appointment

The initial letter of appointment shall specify the nature of the assignment, the percentage emphasis that is to be placed on each of the parts of the faculty responsibility, mandatory year of tenure review, and any special conditions relating to the appointment.

This letter of appointment establishes the nature of the position and, while the percentage of emphasis for each part may vary with each workload distribution as specified in the annual workload agreement document, the part(s) defining the position may not.

CHAPTER III

Periodic Evaluation of Faculty

A.  General Criteria

Criteria as outlined in “UAF Faculty Appointment and Evaluation Policies,” Chapter IV, AND DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES UNIT CRITERIA, STANDARDS AND INDICES, evaluators may consider, but shall not be limited to, whichever of the following are appropriate to the faculty member’s professional obligation: mastery of subject matter; effectiveness in teaching; achievement in research, scholarly, and creative activity; effectiveness of public service; effectiveness of university service; demonstration of professional development and quality of total contribution to the university.

For purposes of evaluation at UAF, the total contribution to the university and activity in the areas outlined above will be defined by relevant activity and demonstrated competence from the following areas: 1) effectiveness in teaching; 2) achievement in scholarly activity; and 3) effectiveness of service.

Bipartite Faculty

Bipartite faculty are regular academic rank faculty who fill positions that are designated as performing two of the three parts of the university’s tripartite responsibility.

The dean or director of the relevant college/school shall determine which of the criteria defined above apply to these faculty.

Bipartite faculty may voluntarily engage in a tripartite function, but they will not be required to do so as a condition for evaluation, promotion, or tenure.

B.  Criteria for Instruction

A central function of the university is instruction of students in formal courses and supervised study. Teaching includes those activities directly related to the formal and informal transmission of appropriate skills and knowledge to students. The nature of instruction will vary for each faculty member, depending upon workload distribution and the particular teaching mission of the unit. Instruction includes actual contact in classroom, correspondence or electronic delivery methods, laboratory or field and preparatory activities, such as preparing for lectures, setting up demonstrations, and preparing for laboratory experiments, as well as individual/independent study, tutorial sessions, evaluations, correcting papers, and determining grades. Other aspects of teaching and instruction extend to undergraduate and graduate academic advising and counseling, training graduate students and serving on their graduate committees, particularly as their major advisor, curriculum development, and academic recruiting and retention activities.

1.  Effectiveness in Teaching

Evidence of excellence in teaching may be demonstrated through, but not limited to, evidence of the various characteristics that define effective teachers. Effective teachers

a.  are highly organized, plan carefully, use class time efficiently, have clear objectives, have high expectations for students;

b.  express positive regard for students, develop good rapport with students, show interest/enthusiasm for the subject;

c. emphasize and encourage student participation, ask questions, frequently monitor student participation for student learning and teacher effectiveness, are sensitive to student diversity;

d.  emphasize regular feedback to students and reward student learning success;

e.  demonstrate content mastery, discuss current information and divergent points of view, relate topics to other disciplines, deliver material at the appropriate level;

f.  regularly develop new courses, workshops and seminars and use a variety of methods of instructional delivery and instructional design;

g.  may receive prizes and awards for excellence in teaching.

2. Components of Evaluation

Effectiveness in teaching will be evaluated through information on formal and informal teaching, course and curriculum material, recruiting and advising, training/guiding graduate students, etc., provided by:

a.  systematic student ratings, i.e. student opinion of instruction summary forms,

and at least two of the following:

b.  narrative self-evaluation,

c.  peer/department chair classroom observation(s),

d.  peer/department chair evaluation of course materials.

FACULTY IN FOREIGN LANGUAGES ARE REQUIRED TO TEACH ALL LEVELS OF THEIR LANGUAGE, AND OFTEN HAVE UNUSUALLY HIGH TEACHING LOADS. THUS, EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING IS THE DEPARTMENT’S HIGHEST PRIORITY. EXCELLENCE IN RESEARCH AND SERVICE CANNOT COMPENSATE FOR AN INSUFFICIENT TEACHING RECORD.

UNTENURED FACULTY MEMBERS WILL HAVE A YEARLY PEER EVALUATION OF THEIR TEACHING, EITHER BY THE DEPARTMENT CHAIR OR ANOTHER FACULTY MEMBER. PEER AND STUDENT EVALUATIONS WILL BOTH BE CONSIDERED WHEN JUDGING A CANDIDATE’S TEACHING RECORD. THE CANDIDATE MUST ADDRESS CONSISTENTLY LOW STUDENT EVALUATIONS IN HIS OR HER SELF-NARRATIVE.

C.  Criteria for Research, Scholarly, and Creative Activity

Inquiry and originality are central functions of a land grant/sea grant/space grant university and all faculty with a research component in their assignment must remain active as scholars. Consequently, faculty are expected to conduct research or engage in other scholarly or creative pursuits that are appropriate to the mission of their unit, and equally important, results of their work must be disseminated through media appropriate to their discipline. Furthermore, it is important to emphasize the distinction between routine production and creative excellence as evaluated by an individual's peers at the University of Alaska and elsewhere.

1. Achievement in Research, Scholarly and Creative Activity

Whatever the contribution, research, scholarly or creative activities must have one or more of the following characteristics:

a.  They must occur in a public forum.

b.  They must be evaluated by appropriate peers.

c.  They must be evaluated by peers external to this institution so as to allow an objective judgment.

d.  They must be judged to make a contribution.

2.  Components of Research, Scholarly and Creative Activity

Evidence of excellence in research, scholarly, and creative activity may be demonstrated through, but not limited to:

a. Books, reviews, monographs, bulletins, articles, proceedings and other scholarly works published by reputable journals, scholarly presses, and publishing houses that accept works only after rigorous review and approval by peers in the discipline.

ALL PEER-REVIEWED PUBLICATIONS SHALL BE CONSIDERED SIGNIFICANT. THIS INCLUDES NOT ONLY THE WRITING OF JOURNAL ARTICLES AND BOOK CHAPTERS BUT ALSO ANY PEER-REVIEWED TRANSLATION OF ARTICLES, BOOKS OR JOURNAL VOLUMES, AS WELL AS CONTRIBUTIONS TO TEXTBOOKS AND OTHER PEDAGOGICAL RESOURCES.

b. Competitive grants and contracts to finance the development of ideas, these grants and contracts being subject to rigorous peer review and approval.

c.  Presentation of research papers before learned societies that accept papers only after rigorous review and approval by peers.

PRESENTATIONS AT CONFERENCES ARE ENCOURAGED AND SHOULD BE CONSIDERED VALID PROFESSIONAL RESEARCH ACTIVITY. HOWEVER, TRAVEL FUNDING EITHER FROM THE UNIVERSITY OR OUTSIDE SOURCES IS OFTEN UNAVAILABLE. THE CANDIDATE SHOULD ADDRESS THE FREQUENCY OF CONFERENCE PRESENTATION AND AVAILABILITY OF FUNDING IN HER/HIS NARRATIVE STATEMENT. 

d. Exhibitions of art work at galleries, selection for these exhibitions being based on rigorous review and approval by juries, recognized artists, or critics.

e.  Performances in recitals or productions, selection for these performances being based on stringent auditions and approval by appropriate judges.

f. Editing or refereeing articles or proposals for professional journals or organizations.

g.  Scholarly reviews of publications, art works and performance of the candidate.

h.  Citations of research in scholarly publications.

i.  Published abstracts of research papers.

j. Reprints or quotations of publications, reproductions of art works, and descriptions of interpretations in the performing arts, these materials appearing in reputable works of the discipline.

k.  Prizes and awards for excellence of scholarship.

l.  Awards of special fellowships for research or artistic activities or selection of tours of duty at special institutes for advanced study.

m. Development of processes or instruments useful in solving problems, such as computer programs and systems for the processing of data, genetic plant and animal material, and where appropriate obtaining patents and/or copyrights for said development.

n.  PUBLICATIONS IN FOREIGN JOURNALS ARE STANDARD IN THE DISCIPLINE. CANDIDATES WILL SUPPLY A TRANSLATION OF THE TITLE OF ANY WORK IN A LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH AND ARE ENCOURAGED TO PROVIDE AN ABSTRACT IN ENGLISH AS WELL AS A DESCRIPTION OF THE JOURNAL.

D.  Criteria for Public and University Service

Public service is intrinsic to the land grant/sea grant/space grant tradition, and is a fundamental part of the university’s obligation to the people of its state. In this tradition, faculty providing their professional expertise for the benefit of the university’s external constituency, free of charge, is identified as “public service.” The tradition of the university itself provides that its faculty assumes a collegial obligation for the internal functioning of the institution; such service is identified as “university service.”

1. Public Service

Public service is the application of teaching, research, and other scholarly and creative activity to constituencies outside the University of Alaska Fairbanks. It includes all activities which extend the faculty member’s professional, academic, or leadership competence to these constituencies. It can be instructional, collaborative, or consultative in nature and is related to the faculty member’s discipline or other publicly recognized expertise. Public service may be systematic activity that involves planning with clientele and delivery of information on a continuing, programmatic basis. It may also be informal, individual, professional contributions to the community or to one’s discipline, or other activities in furtherance of the goals and mission of the university and its units. Such service may occur on a periodic or limited-term basis. Examples include, but are not limited to:

a.  Providing information services to adults or youth.

b.  Service on or to government or public committees.

c.  Service on accrediting bodies.

d.  Active participation in professional organizations.

e.  Active participation in discipline-oriented service organizations.

f.  Consulting.

g.  Prizes and awards for excellence in public service.

h.  Leadership of or presentations at workshops, conferences, or public meetings.

i.  Training and facilitating.

j. Radio and TV programs, newspaper articles and columns, publications, newsletters, films, computer applications, teleconferences and other educational media.

k. Judging and similar educational assistance at science fairs, state fairs, and speech, drama, literary, and similar competitions.

l.  TRANSLATION OF DOCUMENTS FOR THE PUBLIC

2. University Service

University service includes those activities involving faculty members in the governance, administration, and other internal affairs of the university, its colleges, schools, and institutes. It includes non-instructional work with students and their organizations. Examples of such activity include, but are not limited to:

a. Service on university, college, school, institute, or departmental committees or governing bodies.

b. Consultative work in support of university functions, such as expert assistance for specific projects.

c. Service as department chair or term-limited and part-time assignment as assistant/associate dean in a college/school.

d.  Participation in accreditation reviews.

e.  Service on collective bargaining unit committees or elected office.

f.  Service in support of student organizations and activities.

g.  Academic support services such as library and museum programs.

h. Assisting other faculty or units with curriculum planning and delivery of instruction, such as serving as guest lecturer.

i.  Mentoring OF FACULTY.

j.  Prizes and awards for excellence in university service.

k.  OUTSIDE REVIEWER ON THESIS COMMITTEES.

3.  Professional Service

a.  Editing or refereeing articles or proposals for professional journals or organizations.

b.  Active participation in professional organizations.

c.  Active participation in discipline-oriented service organizations.

d.  Committee chair or officer of professional organizations.

e.  Organizer, session organizer, or moderator for professional meetings.

f.  Service on a national or international review panel or committee.

4.  Evaluation of Service

Each individual faculty member’s proportionate responsibility in service shall be reflected in annual workload agreements. In formulating criteria, standards and indices for evaluation, promotion, and tenure, individual units should include examples of service activities and measures for evaluation appropriate for that unit. Excellence in public and university service may be demonstrated through, e.g., appropriate letters of commendation, recommendation, and/or appreciation, certificates and awards and other public means of recognition for services rendered.

12/11/06

 

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The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting # #140 on December 11, 2006:

MOTION:
=======

The UAF Faculty Senate moves to amend the policy on Academic Disqualification (2006-2007 UAF Catalog, page 77) as follows: 

[[   ]]  - Deletion
CAPS - Addition

Academic Disqualification    (pg 77)

Undergraduate students—Undergraduate [[probation]] students on probation whose semester and cumulative GPAs are less than 2.0 at the end of spring semester will be disqualified from degree-seeking status. Disqualified students may continue their enrollment at UAF only as non-degree students and are limited to a maximum of 9 credits per semester. To be eligible for reinstatement in an academic degree program, the student is expected to earn at least a C grade (2.0) in all courses taken as a non-degree student. To be restored to degree-seeking status, the student must apply for readmission. A student may be reinstated but may still be on probation, and if so, will be so notified.

              EFFECTIVE:              Fall 2007

RATIONALE:              This clarifies that a C grade means a 2.0 C and not a 1.7 C-.  The petition process is always in place if there are extenuating circumstances that warrant a continuing probation rather than academic dismissal in some circumstances where a student fails to attain a 2.0 C in all courses.  No changes were made to the probation policy since it already clearly states the 2.0 GPA.

 

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The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting # #140 on December 11, 2006:

MOTION:
=======

The UAF Faculty Senate moves to amend the minimum grade earned in all major and minor course work under the UAF General University Requirements for Certificate or Associate Degrees (2006-2007 UAF Catalog, page 80) and for Baccalaureate Degrees (2006-2007 UAF Catalog, page. 112) as follows: 

CAPS = additions
[[   ]]   = deletions

How to Earn a Certificate or Associate Degree (page 80)

General University Requirements

You must earn at least 30 semester hours for a certificate and 60 semester hours for an associate degree, including transfer credits, to earn a UAF certificate or degree.  At least 15 semester credits applicable to any certificate or associate degree must be earned at UAF.  A minimum GPA of 2.0 is required in all work as well as in your major fields.  In addition, you must earn a minimum C (2.0) grade in courses required for your [[associate degree]] major. 

 

Table 18  General University Requirements for Certificate and Associate Degrees  

 

Certificate

Associate Degree

Minimum number of credits required

30 credits

60 credits

Credits that must be earned at UAF (residence credit)

15 credits

15 credits

Grade point average required

2.0 cumulative and in major

2.0 cumulative and in major

Minimum grades required for major

 

No grade lower than C(2.0) in courses required for major

Catalog year that can be used to meet requirements

May use any catalog in effect when enrolled as a degree-seeking student, regardless of major; five-year limit on catalog year

May use any catalog in effect when enrolled as a degree-seeking student, regardless of major; five-year limit on catalog year

Second degree requirements

 

Only one A.A. degree may be earned; 12 credits beyond first A.A.S. degree and all requirements for the second degree must be met

How to Earn a Baccalaureate Degree (page 112)

General University Requirements

For a UAF bachelor's degree, you need at least 120 semester credits, including transfer credits.  Of these, 39 credits must be upper-division (300-level or above).

At least 30 semester credits applicable to any baccalaureate degree must be earned at UAF.  Transfer students need to earn at least 24 upper-division semester credits at UAF, at least 12 semester credits in the major and at least 3 semester credits in the minor.  You must earn a minimum GPA of 2.0 in all work as well as in your major and minor fields.  In addition, you must earn a minimum C (2.0) grade in courses required for your major. 

Table 19  General University Requirements for Baccalaureate Degrees  

Minimum number of credits required

120 credits

Credits earned at UAF (residence credit)

30 credits

Upper -division credit (courses with numbers between 300 and 499)

39 credits total (some degrees require more); 24 of the 39 must be earned at UAF

Additional UAF credit that must be earned by transfer students

12 credits in the major; 3 credits in the minor

Grade point average required

2.0 cumulative and in major and minor

Minimum grades required for major

No grade lower than C(2.0) in courses required for major

Catalog year that can be used to determine  requirements

May use any catalog in effect when enrolled as a degree-seeking student, regardless of major; seven-year limit on catalog year

Second degree requirements

24 credits beyond the first baccalaureate degree and all requirements for the second degree must be met

              EFFECTIVE:              Fall 2007

RATIONALE:              These changes clarify that the minimum requirement is a 2.0 C rather than a C-.  Individual departments may choose to establish different criteria or to petition the requirements for a particular student.

 

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The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting # #140 on December 11, 2006:

MOTION:
=======

The UAF Faculty Senate moves to amend the Graduation with Honors policy (2006-2007 UAF Catalog, page 81 and 114)  as follows:

CAPS = additions
[[   ]]   = deletions

•Graduation with Honors

Graduation with honors is a tribute that recognizes academic achievement.  Honors graduates have earned a cumulative GPA of 3.5 or higher in all college work.  If a student's overall cumulative GPA is 3.5 or higher, a student graduates with the distinction of cum laude; [[3.8]] 3.75 or higher, magna cum laude; [[4.0]] 3.9 OR HIGHER AND NO GRADE LOWER THAN A-, summa cum laude.  Your cumulative GPA for graduation with honors is based on all college work attempted at UAF, including any repeated or omitted credits due to fresh start. 

              EFFECTIVE:              Fall 2007

RATIONALE:              It is rare that a student completes all work with A grades, and will be even more rare if the A- grade is used and only a 4.0 A is accepted for summa cum laude.  By lowering the grade point to 3.9 and requiring that all grades be A- or above, students who under previous policies (without +/- ) would still be eligible for summa cum laude honors.  Lowering the magna cum laude range to 3.75 establishes some distance between magna and summa cum laude, and allows again for the possibility of decreased GPA as a result of the addition of +/- grades.  For honor grades, all grades are checked by hand to insure than any transfer credits meet the requirements for honors. 

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The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting # #140 on December 11, 2006:

MOTION:
=======

The UAF Faculty Senate moves to amend the Grade Point computation policy (2006-2007 UAF Catalog, pages 74-75) as follows:

CAPS = additions
[[   ]]   = deletions

Grading System and Grade Point Average Computation      (pg 74-75)

All course grades are letter grades unless otherwise specified in the class schedule. The method of grading (letter or pass/fail) is an integral part of the course structure and is included in the course description. Instructors are expected to state their grading policies in writing at the beginning of each course. Grades appearing on academic records are:

(There follows a description of the grades: A, B, C, D, F, P, Cr, DF, AU, W, I, NB)

(Add the following language after the descriptions.)

THE letter grade A, B, C, and D, may INCLUDE a‘+’ or ‘-‘ to indicate a STUDENT’S level of performance isslightly higher or lower than that of the letter grade alone.

•Computing your GPA

Your grade point average (GPA) is a weighted numerical average of the grades you earn in your courses at UAF. To compute your GPA, divide the total number of credits you have attempted into the total number of grade points you have earned. Grade points are calculated by multiplying the number of grade points awarded, according to the chart below, by the number of credits attempted for the course. The following grades are figured in your GPA: A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, and F.  Grades of I, DF, W, P, AU and CR do not carry grade points and do not affect your GPA.

Grade

Grade points per credit

A+

4.0

A

4.0

A-

3.7

B+

3.3

B

3.0

B-

2.7

C+

2.3

C

2.0

C-

1.7

D+

1.3

D

1.0

D-

0.7

F

0.0

EFFECTIVE:              Fall 2007

RATIONALE:              The extra sentence clarifying the use of +/- grades should be added at the end of the descriptions of the standards grades. The table should be updated to include the numerical values for all of the +/- grades.  The list of grades that are included in the GPA should be clearly identified. 

 

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The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting # #140 on December 11, 2006:

MOTION:
=======

The UAF Faculty Senate moves to amend the UAF Academic Honors policy (2006-2007 UAF Catalog, page 76) as follows:

CAPS = additions
[[   ]]   = deletions

ACADEMIC HONORS

Undergraduate and certificate students--To be eligible for academic honors at the end of a semester, you must be a full-time undergraduate degree or certificate student who has completed at least 12 UA institutional credits graded with the letter grades A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, or F.  If you have received an incomplete or deferred grade, your academic honors cannot be determined until those grades have been changed to permanent grades. Academic honors are recorded on your permanent record. You will make the Chancellor's List with a semester GPA of [[4.0]] 3.9, and the dean's list with a GPA of 3.5 or higher.

              EFFECTIVE:              Fall 2007

RATIONALE:              Changing to 3.9 will give students who earn A- grades a chance to be on the Chancellor’s List.  A student who earned 15 credits of 4.0 A and 3 credits of B (total 18 credits) will have only a 3.8.  A student who earns 15 credits of A and one credit of B will have 3.9.  So, yes, occasionally a student with less than all A’s may make Chancellor’s list.