The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting #92 on 
February 7, 2000:


MOTION:
======

The UAF Faculty Senate moves to approve the 2001-2002 Academic 
Calendar as presented by the Registrar prepared in accordance with 
Senate policy and Board of Regents' policies and forward it to the 
Governance Coordinating Committee for action. 

	EFFECTIVE:  	Immediately

	RATIONALE:  	The Curricular Affairs Committee has reviewed 
		the draft 2001-2001 Academic Calendar for compliance with 
		Senate policy and recommends approval of the calendar.  


				***************

					DRAFT
		UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA FAIRBANKS - Fairbanks Campus
			ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2001-2002
		Classes begin after Labor Day for Fall Semester and 
			after Civil Rights Day for Spring Semester.

FALL SEMESTER-2001

Registration and fee payment for the 2001 fall semester begins  
							Mon., Apr. 9, 2001
Application for admission deadline for fall semester	Wed., Aug. 1
Orientation for new students    			Sun.-Wed., Sept. 2-5
Labor Day (no registration or fee payment)		Mon., Sept. 3
Residence halls open, 9 am				Mon., Sept. 3
First day of instruction				Thurs., Sept 6
Late registration begins   				Thurs., Sept 6
Late registration and fee payment end			Fri., Sept. 14
Last day for 100% refund of tuition and materials fees	Fri., Sept. 14
Last day for student-initiated and faculty-initiated drops
	(course does not appear on academic record)	Fri., Sept. 21
Last day for 50% refund of tuition (only)		Fri., Sept. 21
Low grade reports for freshmen due not later than	Fri., Oct. 12
Last day to apply for 2001 fall graduation   		Mon., Oct. 15
Last day for student-initiated and faculty-initiated withdrawals 
 	(W grade given for course)			Fri., Nov. 2
Registration and fee payment for the 2002 spring semester begin
							Mon., Nov. 12
Thanksgiving holidays (no classes)			Thurs.-Sun., Nov. 22-25
Last day of instruction					Fri., Dec. 14
Final examinations  					Mon.-Thurs., Dec. 17-20
Residence halls close, noon				Fri., Dec. 21
Grades due to the Registrar's Office  			Fri., Dec. 21
Campus closed	5 p.m., Fri., Dec. 21, 2001 - 8 a.m., Wed., Jan 2. 2002

SPRING SEMESTER-2002

Application for admission deadline for spring semester
							Mon., Dec. 3, 2001
Orientation for new students			Tues.-Wed, Jan. 15-16, 2002
Residence halls open, 9 a.m.				Mon., Jan. 14
Alaska Civil Rights Day (registration and fee payment continue)
							Mon., Jan. 14
First day of instruction				Thurs., Jan. 17
Late registration begins   				Thurs., Jan. 17
Late registration and fee payment end			Fri., Jan. 25
Last day for 100% refund of tuition and material fees	Fri., Jan. 25
Last day for student-initiated and faculty-initiated drops
	(course does not appear on academic record)	Fri., Feb. 1
Last day for 50% refund of tuition (only)    		Fri., Feb. 1
Last day to apply for 2002 spring graduation		Fri., Feb. 15
Low grade reports for freshmen due not later than	Fri., Feb. 22
Spring recess						Mon.-Sun., Mar. 11-17
Last day for student-initiated and faculty-initiated withdrawals 
	(W grade given for course)			Fri., Mar. 22
Registration and fee payment for the 2002 fall semester begin
							Mon., Apr. 8
All Campus Day (no classes)				Fri., Apr. 26
Last day of instruction     				Fri., May 3
Final examinations 					Mon.-Thurs., May 6-9
Residence halls close, noon				Fri., May 10
Commencement**  					Sun., May 12
Grades due to the Registrar's Office  			Wed., May 15

**Saturday, May 11 may be an alternate date for Commencement (to 
coordinate with other MAU's).
Proposed by Ann Tremarello, January 25, 2000.


***************

The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting #92 on 
February 7, 2000:


MOTION:
======

The UAF Faculty Senate moves to approve the Unit Criteria for Alaska 
Native Language Center (ANLC).  

	EFFECTIVE:  	Immediately
			Upon Chancellor Approval

	RATIONALE:  	The committee assessed the unit criteria 
		submitted by Alaska Native Language Center (ANLC).  With 
		some minor changes, agreed upon by the department 
		representative, Larry Kaplan, the unit criteria were found 
		to be consistent with UAF guidelines.


				***************


UAF REGULATIONS FOR THE EVALUATION OF FACULTY: INITIAL APPOINTMENT, ANNUAL REVIEW, REAPPOINTMENT, PROMOTION, TENURE, AND SABBATICAL LEAVE AND ALASKA NATIVE LANGUAGE CENTER STANDARDS AND INDICIES
I. PURVIEW The University of Alaska Fairbanks document, "Faculty Appointment and Evaluation Policies" (hereinafter referred to as UAF Faculty Policies), supplements the Board of Regents policies and describes the purpose, conditions, eligibility, and other specifications relating to the evaluation of faculty at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Contained herein are regulations and procedures to guide the evaluation processes and to identify the bodies of review appropriate for UAF. The University, through the UAF Faculty Senate, may wish to change or amend these regulations and procedures from time to time and will provide adequate notice in making changes and amendments. The Provost is responsible for coordination and implementation of matters relating to procedures stated herein. II. INITIAL APPOINTMENT OF FACULTY A. Criteria for Initial Appointment. Minimum degree, experience and performance requirements are set forth in UAF Faculty Policies, Chapter IV. Exceptions to these requirements for initial placement in academic rank or special academic rank positions shall be submitted to the Chancellor or Chancellor's designee for approval prior to a final selection decision. B. Academic Titles. Academic titles must reflect the discipline in which the faculty are appointed and reside within a specific discipline. Units wishing to appoint academic rank faculty within schools and colleges to titles must have the concurrence of the specific discipline in which the title resides. C. Process for Appointment of Faculty with Academic Rank. Deans of schools and colleges, and directors when appropriate, in conjunction with the faculty in a unit shall establish procedures for advertisement, review, and selection of candidates to fill any faculty positions as they become available. Such procedures shall be consistent with the University's affirmative action policies and shall provide for participation in hiring by faculty and administrators as a unit. D. Process for Appointment of Faculty with Special Academic Rank. Deans and/or directors, in conjunction with the faculty in a unit, shall establish procedures for advertisement, review, and selection of candidates to fill any faculty positions as they become available. Such procedures shall be consistent with the University's stated affirmative action policies and shall provide for participation in hiring by faculty and administrators in the unit. These procedures shall be on file in the Chancellor's Office. E. Following the selection process, the dean or director shall appoint the new faculty member and advise him/her of the conditions, benefits, and obligations of the position. If the appointment is to be at the professor level, the dean/director must first obtain the concurrence of the Chancellor or his/her designee. F. Letter of Appointment. The initial letter of appointment shall specify the nature of the assignment, the percentage emphasis that is to be placed on each of the parts of the faculty responsibility, and any special conditions relating to the appointment. This letter of appointment establishes the nature of the position and, while the percentage of emphasis for each part may vary with each workload distribution, the part(s) defining the position may not. Subsequent letters of appointment may vary the work load distribution and nature of the assignment. III. PERIODIC EVALUATION OF FACULTY A. Criteria. As outlined in UAF Faculty Policies, Chapter IV.A.3. evaluators may consider, but shall not be limited to, whichever of the following are appropriate to the faculty member's professional obligation: mastery of subject matter; effectiveness in teaching; achievement in research, scholarly, and creative activity; effectiveness of public service; effectiveness of university service; demonstration of professional development and quality of total contribution to the university. For purposes of evaluation at UAF, the total contribution to the university and activity in the areas outlined above will be defined by activity and excellence in the following tripartite areas: l) effectiveness in teaching; 2) achievement in scholarly activity; and 3) effectiveness of service. B. Bipartite Faculty. Bipartite faculty are regular academic rank faculty who fill positions that are designated as performing two of the three parts of the university's tripartite responsibility. As defined in UAF Faculty Policy (IV.A.2.), only vocational/ technical faculty and extension agents may hold bipartite rank. No other faculty may hold bipartite rank. The determination of which of the criteria defined above will apply to these faculty shall be in accordance with nstitutional needs for the given position, will be coordinated by the dean of the appropriate school or college in consultation with the director, in cases of joint appointment, and with the program faculty. While bipartite faculty may choose to engage in a tripartite function, they will not be required to do so as a condition for evaluation, promotion, or tenure. C. Definitions of Criteria. 1. Effectiveness in Teaching. A central function of the university is instruction of students in formal courses and supervised study. Teaching includes those activities directly related to the formal and informal transmission of appropriate skills and knowledge to students. The nature of instruction will vary for each faculty member, depending upon workload distribution and the particular teaching mission of the unit. Instruction includes actual contact in classroom or through distance delivery methods, laboratory or field and preparatory activities, such as preparing for lectures, setting up demonstrations, and preparing for laboratory experiments, as well as tutorial sessions, evaluations, correcting papers, and determining grades. Other aspects of teaching and instruction extend to undergraduate and graduate academic advising and counseling, training graduate students and serving on their graduate committees particularly as their major advisor, curriculum development, and academic recruiting. Evidence of excellence in teaching may be demonstrated through, but not limited to, evidence of the various characteristics which define effective teachers. Effective teachers a. are highly organized, plan carefully, use class time efficiently, have clear objectives, have high expectations for students; b. express positive regard for students, develop good rapport with students, show interest/enthusiasm for the subject; c. emphasize and encourage student participation, ask questions, frequently monitor student participation for student learning and teacher effectiveness, are sensitive to student diversity; d. emphasize regular feedback to students and reward student learning success; e. demonstrate content mastery, discuss current information and divergent points of view, relate topics to other disciplines, deliver material at the appropriate level; f. regularly develop new courses, workshops and seminars and use a variety of methods of instructional delivery and instructional design. G. OFTEN DEAL WITH STUDENTS IN SMALLER GROUPS. BECAUSE OF THE DEMOGRAPHY OF ALASKA NATIVES AND THE ENDANGERED STATUS OF ALL ALASKA NATIVE LANGUAGES, INDIVIDUAL STUDY CLASSES ARE OFTEN THE ONLY MEANS OF PROVIDING CRUCIAL INSTRUCTION TO MEMBERS OF SMALL NATIVE GROUPS WHO HAVE THE POTENTIAL TO BECOME LINGUISTS AND LANGUAGE SPECIALISTS. H. ARE REQUIRED TO MAKE THEIR OWN CLASSROOM MATERIALS TO A MUCH GREATER EXTENT THAN IN MOST OTHER DISCIPLINES, SINCE PUBLISHED INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS FOR ALASKA NATIVE LANGUAGES ARE LIMITED. i. Effectiveness in teaching will be evaluated through information on formal and informal teaching, course and curriculum materials, recruiting and advising, training/guiding graduate students, etc., provided by: a. systematic student ratings (required source of data) and at least two of the following: b. self-evaluation c. peer/head classroom observation(s) d. peer/head evaluation of course materials 2. Achievement in Research, Scholarly, and Creative Activity. Inquiry and originality are central functions of a land grant/ sea grant university and all faculty with a research component in their assignment must remain active as scholars. Consequently, faculty are expected to conduct research or engage in other scholarly or creative pursuits that are appropriate to the mission of their unit, and equally important, results of their work must be disseminated through media appropriate to their discipline. Furthermore, it is important to emphasize the distinction between routine production and creative excellence as evaluated by an individual's peers at the University of Alaska and elsewhere. Whatever the contribution, research, scholarly or creative activities must have the following characteristics: - They must occur in a public forum. - They must be evaluated by appropriate peers. - They must be evaluated by peers external to this institution so as to allow an objective judgment. - They must be judged to make a contribution. Evidence of excellence in research, scholarly, and creative activity may be demonstrated through, but not limited to: a. Books, reviews, monographs, bulletins, articles, proceedings and other scholarly works published by reputable journals, scholarly presses, and publishing houses that accept works only after rigorous review and approval by peers in the discipline. THE MISSION OF ANLC PROVIDES FOR THE DISTRIBUTION OF NATIVE LANGUAGE PUBLICATIONS, INCLUDING GRAMMARS, DICTIONARIES, TEXTS AND INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS, TO THE PEOPLE OF ALASKA AND NATIVE GROUPS IN PARTICULAR. THE ALASKA NATIVE LANGUAGE CENTERıS PUBLICATION PROGRAM IS AN EFFECTIVE MEANS OF ACCOMPLISHING THIS GOAL AND IS VIEWED AS A REPUTABLE PRESS IN THE FIELD OF NATIVE AMERICAN LINGUISTICS. ANLC IS FOREMOST IN PUBLISHING IN ATHABASKAN WORLDWIDE AND FOREMOST IN ESKIMO-ALEUT PUBLISHING IN NORTH AMERICA. MANUSCRIPTS TO BE PUBLISHED ARE SENT FOR REVIEW AND COMMENT TO APPROPRIATE SPECIALISTS OUTSIDE THE INSTITUTION WHEREVER POSSIBLE. b. Competitive grants and contracts to finance the development of ideas; these grants and contracts being subject to rigorous peer review and approval. c. Presentation of research papers before learned societies that accept papers only after rigorous review and approval by peers. d. Exhibitions of art works at galleries; selection for these exhibitions being based on rigorous review and approval by juries, recognized artists, or critics. e. Performances in recitals or productions; selection for these performances being based on stringent auditions and approval by appropriate judges. f. Presentation of research papers before learned societies. g. Scholarly reviews of publications, art works and performance of the candidate. h. Citations of research in scholarly publications. i. Published abstracts of research papers. j. Reprints or quotations of publications, reproductions of art works, and descriptions of interpretations in the performing arts; these materials appearing in reputable works of the discipline. k. Prizes and awards for excellence of scholarship. 1. Awards of special fellowships for research or artistic activities or selection of tours of duty at special institutes for advanced study. m. Development of processes or instruments useful in solving problems, such as computer programs and systems for the processing of data, genetic plant and animal material, and where appropriate obtaining patents and/or copyrights for said development. N. OTHER MEANS OF DISSEMINATING INFORMATION ABOUT ALASKA NATIVE LANGUAGES, SUCH AS MAPS, CDıS, AUDIO TAPES, VIDEO TAPES, AND WEB PAGES. O. INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS FOR ALASKA NATIVE LANGUAGES. NOTE: GIVEN THE MISSION OF ANLC, THERE IS OFTEN AN OVERLAP BETWEEN RESEARCH AND PUBLIC SERVICE, SO THAT RESULTS OF RESEARCH ARE MOST OFTEN OF DIRECT BENEFIT TO THE ALASKAN PUBLIC AS WELL AS THE SCHOLARLY COMMUNITY. SINCE PUBLICATIONS ARE INTENDED FOR THE PUBLIC AND ESPECIALLY THE NATIVE COMMUNITY, THEY VERY OFTEN TAKE A DIFFERENT FORM FROM OTHER SCHOLARLY RESEARCH. 3. Effectiveness of Service The notion of public service is intrinsic to the land grant/sea grant tradition, and is a fundamental part of the university's obligation to the people of its state. In this tradition, faculty providing their professional expertise for the benefit of the university's external constituency, free of charge, is identified as "public service." The tradition of the university itself provides that its faculty assume a collegial obligation for the internal functioning of the institution; such service is identified as "university service." a. Public Service Public service is the application of teaching, research, and other scholarly and creative activity to constituencies outside the University of Alaska Fairbanks. It includes all activities which extend the faculty member's professional, academic, or leadership competence to these constituencies. It can be instructional, collaborative, or consultative in nature and is related to the faculty member's discipline or other publicly recognized expertise. Public service may be systematic activity that involves planning with clientele and delivery of information on a continuing, programmatic basis. It may also be informal, individual, professional contributions to the community or to one's discipline, or other activities in furtherance of the goals and mission of the university and its units; such service may occur on a periodic or limited-term basis. Examples include, but are not limited to: (1) Providing information services to adults or youth. (2) Service on or to government or public committees. (3) Service on accrediting bodies. (4) Active participation in professional organizations. (5) Active participation in discipline-oriented service organizations. (6) Editing or refereeing articles or proposals for professional journals or organizations. (7) Consulting. (8) TEACHING OF LINGUISTICS AND ALASKA NATIVE LANGUAGES IN NOT-FOR-CREDIT SITUATIONS. Methods of delivering public service may include, but are not limited to: (1) Leadership of or presentations at workshops, conferences, or public meetings. (2) Training, facilitating, and consultative services. (3) Radio and TV programs, newspaper articles and columns, publications, newsletters, films, computer applications, teleconferences and other educational media. (4) Judging and similar educational assistance at science fairs, state fairs, and speech, drama, literary, and similar competitions. b. University Service University service includes those activities involving faculty members in the governance, administration, and other internal affairs of the university, its colleges, schools, and institutes. It includes non-instructional work with students and their organizations. Examples of such activity include, but are not limited to: (1) Service on university, college, school, institute, or departmental committees or governing bodies. (2) Consultative work in support of university functions, such as expert assistance for specific projects. (3) Service as department head or similar part-time administrator. (4) Participation in accreditation reviews. (5) Service in support of student organizations and activities. (6) Academic support services such as library and museum programs. (7) Assisting other faculty or units with curriculum planning and delivery of instruction, such as serving as guest lecturer. c. Evaluation of Service Each individual faculty member's proportionate responsibility in service shall be reflected in annual workload agreements and performance evaluations. In formulating standards and indices for evaluation, promotion, and tenure, individual units should include examples of service activities appropriate for that unit, and measures for evaluation. Effectiveness of public service is "demonstrated by such things as: professionally related and publicly recognized service to constituencies external to the university, including public and private sector groups, governmental agencies, boards, commissions, committees, public interest groups, community groups, businesses, and urban and rural residents; successful design and implementation of technology-transfer programs to external constituencies; application of directed research to the needs of constituencies; recognition, awards and honors from constituent groups; and reputation among peer deliverers of public service. Effectiveness of university service is demonstrated by such things as work on university committees and task forces; participation in faculty governance; colleague assistance; administrative work, and work with students beyond formal teacher-student relationships.