The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting #68  on 
December 9, 1996:


MOTION PASSED (unanimous)
==============

The UAF Faculty Senate moves to approve changing the name of the 
Alliance of Faculty Senates to Faculty Alliance.

	EFFECTIVE: 	Immediately

	RATIONALE: 	This name change is proposed by the Alliance 
		which is a coordinating body of all three campus 
		governing bodies because of the University of Alaska 
		Southeast Reorganization.  In this change, Southeast has 
		replaced its Senate with a Council, and, therefore, the 
		current name is not correct.  The change to Faculty 
		Alliance is appropriate.


******************************************************

The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting #68  on 
December 9, 1996:


MOTION PASSED (unanimous)
==============

The UAF Faculty Senate moves to disband the Health Issues 
Committee of the UAF Governance Coordinating Committee and 
approves the following revisions to the Procedures:  

((  ))   =	Deletion


ARTICLE V	Committees

Sect. 1	The conference committees of the UAF Governance 
		Coordinating Committee shall include:  

		Academic Computer Users Committee
		Intercollegiate Athletics Committee
		Chancellorąs Advisory Committee on Public Safety, 
			Transportation and Parking
		Rural Affairs Committee
		UAF Grievance Council
		((Health Issues))

Sect. 3	Conference Committees Charges

		((F.  Health Issues Committee

		The charge of the Health Issues committee shall be to:

		1.	address health issues which affect the work 
		environment.
			2.	coordinate efforts with the Health Center, 
			Fire Department, Risk Management, and Public 
			Safety to find solutions to health issues.))


	EFFECTIVE: 	Upon Faculty Senate, Staff Council, and 
		ASUAF approval, prior to Chancellorąs approval

	RATIONALE:  	A Statewide committee has been formed to 
		address possible changes to the health benefits program. 
		The Health Issues Committee would only duplicate 
		efforts by this committee and would not be a productive 
		use of staff, faculty and student time.  


****************************************************
The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting #68  on 
December 9, 1996:


MOTION PASSED (20 ayes, 5 nays)
==============

The UAF Faculty Senate moves to refer the motion to adopt a 
procedure for petitions to the CORE based on documentation of 
student disability to Curricular Affairs for review of the context of 
the motion in the overall petition process.


****************************************************
The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting #68  on 
December 9, 1996:


MOTION PASSED (unanimous)
==============

The UAF Faculty Senate moves to approve a new program in Health 
Technology which includes an AAS in Medical Assistant and two 
certificates:  Medical/Dental Reception and Phlebotomy & Laboratory 
Assisting.  

	EFFECTIVE: 	Upon Board of Regentsą Approval

	RATIONALE: 	See attached Executive Summary.  Full 
		program proposal #83 on file in the Governance Office, 
		312 Signersą Hall.


----------------------------------------------------------
Executive Summary of Medical Assistant Certificate and Degree 
Program Request, Division of Health Technology, College of Rural 
Alaska

Request prepared by:
Betsy Tozzi, Assistant Professor, Health Technology, CRA/TVC
Linda Curda, Assistant Professor, Division Head, Health 
Technology, CRA/KUC
Ruth Lister, Director, Tanana Valley Campus, College of Rural 
Alaska

The Medical Assistant Certificate and A.A.S. Programs prepare 
students for careers as health care paraprofessionals.  Employers 
have indicated needs for workers that crossed functional borders 
within their organizations (i.e. identified the need for skilled, 
cross-trained individuals), and most frequently cited a need for 
administrative staff (receptionists and billing/reimbursement 
specialists) and out-patient care paraprofessionals (phlebotomists, 
procedure assistants, instrument care specialists).  The specialty 
certificates in Medical/Dental Reception and Phlebotomy and Lab 
Assisting as well as the Medical Assistant A.A.S. degree have been 
designed to be responsive to these local employers' needs.

Welfare reform has reduced education and training benefits to 
eligible recipients; eligible individuals may receive financial 
support for a maximum of 12 months.  To address these welfare 
reform changes and the needs of many students to enter the work 
force as soon as possible, the Medical/Dental Reception Certificate 
and Phlebotomy and Lab Assisting Certificate programs document 
proficiency in specialized skill areas and provide employment 
options when students have completed approximately 1/2 the 
necessary credits required for the Medical Assistant A.A.S. degree.  
After graduating with a certificate, a student may elect to complete 
the Medical Assistant A.A.S. degree requirements in order to enhance 
employability.  As a direct result of their course work within the 
program, three students have been hired as phlebotomists in 
Fairbanks, and one of these three individuals has already sat for the 
ASCP national examination and received a passing score, thereby 
achieving national certification as a Phlebotomy Technician (PBT, 
ASCP).

These proposed programs have been developed to align with the UAF 
2000 strategic plan.  As accreditation of health care programs will 
be required for students to be eligible to sit for national 
certification examinations, curricula have been constructed to meet 
all necessary accreditation standards.  Inasmuch as all required 
program components have been developed and are in place, no 
complications are foreseen in implementation of certificate and 
A.A.S. degree programs upon approval.  Resources and equipment 
needs will not require allocation of any additional funds to Tanana 
Valley Campus or College of Rural Alaska.  No new funding is 
required or requested to support the programs.  Disposable medical 
supplies for classes are paid for with student material fees; 
donations of equipment and supplies from numerous sources have 
helped offset start-up costs and ongoing expenditures.

In conclusion, due to current and future needs for skilled health care 
workers and cost containment mandates in health care, the Medical 
Assistant Certificate and A.A.S. Degree programs in the College of 
Rural Alaska are well positioned to provide vocational-technical 
training for interested students. The implementation of these 
programs will benefit the university by generating increased student 
credit hours and improved ties with the community, employers, and 
government agencies. The Medical / Dental Reception Certificate, 
Phlebotomy and Lab Assisting Certificate, and the Medical Assistant 
A.A.S. degree programs will generate a cadre of well-qualified 
cross-trained health care paraprofessionals and allow employers to 
recruit from their local communities rather than hiring new staff 
from outside of Alaska.

October 28, 1996


****************************************************
The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting #68  on 
December 9, 1996:


MOTION PASSED (unanimous)
==============

The UAF Faculty Senate moves to approve the Certificate in Applied 
Business.  

	EFFECTIVE: 	Upon Board of Regentsą Approval

	RATIONALE: 	See attached Executive Summary.  Full 
		program proposal #48 on file in the Governance Office, 
		312 Signersą Hall.


------------------------------------------------------------
CERTIFICATE OF APPLIED BUSINESS
UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA FAIRBANKS
COLLEGE OF RURAL ALASKA
TANANA VALLEY CAMPUS


Regents Executive Summary


The UAF College of Rural Alaska proposes an innovative vocational, 
technical education certificate in Applied Business.  This certificate 
is intended to serve Alaskan businesses and organizations by 
providing a pool of graduates who have received comprehensive 
training (30 credits) in critical aspects of business management.  
The certificate will further act as a stepping stone for the 
Associates Degree in Applied Business and various Bachelor Degrees.

Currently, there are over 60 declared majors in the Applied Business 
program and credit hour production increased 30% in the fall of 1996 
compared to fall of 1995.  While subscription to the applied business 
courses are strong, the credit hours do not currently produce a 
corresponding number of graduates Low numbers of graduates are a 
result of program demographics.  Nearly all students are non-
traditional and part-time (i.e. more mature, experienced, and 
working full or part-time, taking 6 credits).  As a result of work and 
family demands completing all the academic requirements for an 
A.A.S. may take more than 5 years.  This intermediate vocational 
education certificate is therefore vital to continued student 
motivation.

Many small to medium size business, non-profits, and agencies in 
Fairbanks promote employees into management positions without 
benefit of formal supervisory training.  There is a strong need for a 
structured and credible management training certificate program in 
Fairbanks.  The Northwest, Kuskokwim, and Tanana Valley Campuses 
already provide that management training through existing applied 
business courses as part of the A.A.S. degree.  An intent of this 
certificate is to "bundle" those courses already offered in other 
programs into a meaningful management curriculum which will 
fulfill a current training need in both Rural Alaska and Fairbanks and 
provide a path for business people who have no college experience to 
earn degrees.

Faculty who teach the courses required in this certificate have 
significant credibility within their respective local business 
sectors.  Once the certificate program is approved, the College of 
Rural Alaska Applied Business department will implement an image 
campaign to stimulate additional demand by business for employees 
awarded this certificate.

Implementation of the Certificate in Applied Business will support 
the University of Alaska's commitment to business development 
within the State of Alaska and the vocational education component 
of the university's mission.  Credits from the certificate are readily 
transferred and accepted within the A.A.S. business degrees of UAA 
and UAF.  Implementation of the certificate will significantly 
benefit students who transfer between universities prior to award 
of their A.A.S. degree.

Finally, there is no additional cost to UAF or the University of 
Alaska System for this certificate.  All faculty required to teach the 
certificate courses are currently employed and all courses required 
are currently offered through other degree programs.


9/30/96


****************************************************
The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting #68  on 
December 9, 1996:


RESOLUTION PASSED (19 ayes, 4 nays)
==================

WHEREAS the UAF Faculty Senate is the duly elected assembly of 
	faculty representatives, serving as the legislative body of 
	the university faculty, having authority to recommend on 
	formulation and implementation of policy pertinent to 
	faculty governance at UAF; and

WHEREAS the UAF Faculty Senate carries out the tasks of faculty 
	governance through a number of Standing and Permanent 
	Committees; and

WHEREAS the charge of the UAF Faculty Senate's various Standing 
	and Permanent Committees includes evaluation and 
	recommendation on policy initiatives affecting faculty 
	governance; and

WHEREAS the UAF Faculty Senate's Standing Committee on Faculty 
	Affairs and the UAF Faculty Senate's Ad Hoc Committee on 
	Union-Governance Relations have specific charge to evaluate 
	and recommend on policy directly and substantially 
	pertinent to mandatory items of collective bargaining; and

WHEREAS United Academics/AAUP-AFT is a duly recognized 
	collective bargaining agent negotiating with the University 
	of Alaska Administration on behalf of faculty concerns; and

WHEREAS United Academics/AAUP-AFT, notwithstanding its 
	legally independent incorporation, is constituted inter alia 
	explicitly to sustain and enhance faculty governance at the 
	University of Alaska;

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED That the UAF Faculty Senate hereby 
	requests the Executive Board of United Academics/AAUP-
	AFT:

	(1) to reaffirm, by way of written communication to the 
	President of the UAF Faculty Senate and to the President of 
	the Faculty Alliance, UA/AAUP-AFT's commitment to sustain 
	and enhance faculty governance at the University of Alaska;

	(2) to make provision, by way of exchange of written and 
	oral communications, for the UAF Senate's Ad Hoc 
	Committee on Union-Governance Relations to review and 
	recommend on the substance of UA/AAUP-AFT contract 
	negotiations with the University of Alaska Administration;

	(3) to include a member of the UAF Faculty Senate's Standing 
	Committee on Faculty Affairs, who is also a member of 
	United Academics, in UA/AAUP-AFT Executive Board 
	deliberations on contract negotiations; and,

	(4) to appoint, as representative of the UAF Faculty Senate, 
	a member of the UAF Faculty Senate's Standing Committee 
	on Faculty Affairs, who is also a member of United 
	Academics, to the UA/AAUP-AFT Contract Negotiating Team, 
	with all rights and privileges of participation thereto 
	pertaining.


****************************************************
The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting #68  on 
December 9, 1996:


MOTION PASSED (21 ayes, 5 nays)
==============

The UAF Faculty Senate moves to change the policies on 
"Withdrawing from a Class" and "Faculty Initiated Withdrawal" and 
the grading policies of "I" Incomplete and "NB" No Basis, as follows:


((   ))  =  deletions,  
CAPS  =  ADDITIONS


Withdrawing from a Class --

	If you withdraw from a class after the third Friday after the 
first day of instruction, a grade of "W" will appear on your academic 
record.  The "W" grade does not affect your GPA.  The last day you can 
withdraw from a class is the ((fourth)) NINTH Friday after the first 
day of instruction. ((unless you are a freshman or a non-degree 
students. Freshman and non-degree students may withdraw from 
classes until the sixth Friday after the first day of instruction.))


Faculty Initiated Withdrawal/DROP--

	((If you do not meet the prerequisites for a course in which you 
have enrolled the faculty member teaching that course has the right 
to drop you from the class prior to the fourth Friday after the first 
day of instruction. ))

	IF YOU DO NOT MEET THE PREREQUISITES FOR A COURSE IN 
WHICH YOU HAVE ENROLLED, OR IF YOU HAVE NOT PARTICIPATED 
SUBSTANTIALLY IN THE COURSE, THE FACULTY MEMBER TEACHING 
THAT COURSE HAS THE RIGHT TO WITHDRAW YOU FROM THE CLASS BY 
THE NINTH FRIDAY AFTER THE FIRST DAY OF INSTRUCTION. IF YOU ARE 
WITHDRAWN  FROM A CLASS AFTER THE THIRD FRIDAY AFTER THE 
FIRST DAY OF INSTRUCTION, A GRADE OF "W" WILL APPEAR ON YOUR 
ACADEMIC RECORD.  FACULTY  INITIATED WITHDRAWALS PREVIOUS TO 
THE THIRD FRIDAY AFTER THE FIRST DAY OF INSTRUCTION WILL BE 
TREATED AS A DROPPED CLASS.


"I"	Incomplete--

	A grade used to indicate that ((you've satisfactorily completed 
(C or better) the majority of the work in a course, but for personal 
reasons beyond your control,)) YOU haven't been able to complete the 
course during the scheduled course time.  

	When the "I" grade is given, the instructor includes a 
statement of the work required of you to complete the course AND 
THE TIME LIMITS YOU HAVE TO COMPLETE THE WORK. THE MAXIMUM 
TIME TO BE ALLOWED IS ONE YEAR.  AT THE END OF THE DEFINED TIME 
LIMITS THE INSTRUCTOR MAY ISSUE A GRADE BASED ON THE WORK 
TURNED IN.  IF THE INSTRUCTOR DOES NOT CHANGE THE "I" GRADE IT 
BECOMES PERMANENT AT THE END OF ONE YEAR. 

	((You must make up an incomplete within one year or it will 
automatically be changed to an "F" grade.))  The "I" grade is not 
computed in your GPA. ((until it has been changed to a regular letter 
grade by the instructor or until one year has elapsed, at which time 
it will be computed as an "F")) Seniors cannot graduate with an "I" 
grade in either a UAF or major course requirement.  ((To determine a 
senior's GPA at graduation , an "I" grade will be computed as a 
failing grade))


(("NB"   No Basis--

	Instructors may award a No Basis (NB) grade if there is 
insufficient student progress and/or attendance for evaluation to 
occur.  No credit is given, nor is "NB" calculated in the GPA.  This is a 
permanent grade and may not be used to substitute for the 
Incomplete (I).  It canąt be removed by later completing outstanding 
work.))


	EFFECTIVE: 	Fall 1997

	RATIONALE:  	With the change in the cap on tuition student 
		credit shopping does not seem to be a problem, which 
		was one of the main reasons for the double tiering of the 
		original policy.  This change makes the withdrawal policy 
		uniform for all students.  This policy does not effect the 
		CRA policy which states that students have nine weeks 
		for their withdrawal period.

		The faculty initiated withdrawal policy change gives the 
		instructor the ability to remove from the class students 
		who have a very high probability of failing the class if 
		they were to attempt to start participation at a later 
		date. It also provides a bit of a grade safety net for 
		students who for what ever reason sign up for a class 
		and then never turn in any work, but also never withdraw,  
		from accumulating a series of "F" grades.

		Students who are Faculty dropped during the first three 
		weeks, because they do not meet the course 
		prerequisites, will not have the course appear on their 
		transcript and they will receive a full tuition refund.  
		Students who are Faculty Withdrawn after the fourth 
		Friday will receive a "W" on their transcript and will not 
		receive any tuition refund.

		This may place students who are receiving financial aid 
		in jeopardy of loosing that aid but in most cases this 
		policy will be no more onerous than if the student 
		received a grade other than an A, B, C, or D.

		This change in the "I" grade gives the instructor the 
		option to control the time limits and to issue a grade 
		based on the work turned in.  The permanent "I" more 
		correctly reflects what the student did not accomplish, 
		as compared to the transformation of the "I" to an "F".  A 
		student who receives a permanent "I" grade would have to 
		retake the course to earn credit.  The criteria by which 
		the instructor will issue the "I" can be delineated at the 
		beginning of the course, just as they do for all other 
		grades.  As per the catalog instructors are expected to 
		state their grading policies in writing at the beginning of 
		each course.

		Changes in the "I", and "W" grading policies address the 
		purposes for having the "NB" grade.  Therefore the "NB" 
		grade is no longer needed.