The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting #40 on 
March 22, 1993:


MOTION PASSED (w/1 nay, 1 abstention)
===============

The UAF Faculty Senate moves to approve the deletion of program 
request:  Korean.  



Signed:  Timothy Tilsworth, President, UAF Faculty Senate
	Date:  3/30/93


Approved:  J. Wadlow, Chancellor   	Date:  4/2/93


-------------------------------------------------------------

The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting #40 on 
March 22, 1993:


MOTION PASSED 
===============

The UAF Faculty Senate moves to accept the Curricular Affairs 
Committee recommendations concerning the deletion of the 
Humanities program.



Signed:  Timothy Tilsworth, President, UAF Faculty Senate
	Date:  3/30/93


Approved:  J. Wadlow, Chancellor   	Date:  4/12/93

*With modification in April 13, 1993 memo.


				---------------

MEMORANDUM


TO:  		Tim Tilsworth, President
		UAF Faculty Senate

FROM:  		Joan K. Wadlow, Chancellor
		University of Alaska Fairbanks

DATE:  		April 13, 1993

RE:   		MOTION CONCERNING HUMANITIES


I am approving with modification the attached Senate motion 
concerning the deletion of the Humanities program.

I approve Recommendation #1, and agree with the Senate that the 
Humanities major should be deleted.

However, I do not approve Recommendation #2.  I maintain that the 
Humanities minor should also be deleted.  The intent to delete the 
Humanities program was announced on May 4, 1992, and was a 
consequence of UAF's program review process that was conducted 
according to guidelines approved by the Faculty Senate.  
Subsequently, additional reviews within the College of Liberal Arts 
and faculty groups occurred.  During this second set of reviews, 
several different recommendations were made.  Their various 
recommendations are in the record.  My proposal to the Board of 
Regents to eliminate both the major and the minor, endorses the 
recommendation of the CLA Curriculum Council.

JKW/lks


				***************

CURRICULAR AFFAIRS COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS ON THE 
HUMANITIES PROGRAM DELETION:


1.	CONCERNING DELETION OF THE HUMANITIES MAJOR-

RECOMMENDATION:
	The Humanities major should be deleted.

RATIONALE:
	The Humanities major has drawn little interest from students.  
Its elimination would result in a slight savings in resources.


2.	CONCERNING DELETION OF THE HUMANITIES MINOR-

RECOMMENDATION:
	The Humanities minor should not be deleted at this time.  It is 
suggested that the Department of Philosophy and Humanities, in 
cooperation with other departments offering humanities courses, 
revise the minor program in order to accomplish the following 
objectives:

a.	Make the minor more attractive to students as evidenced by 
increased declarations;

b.	Allow use of humanities courses from other disciplines (e.g., 
Art, Literature, Music, Theater, etc.) which will, in turn, allow a 
reduction in the number of Humanities courses offered each 
semester.

c.	Humanities courses which appreciably overlap with courses 
from other disciplines such as Humanities 220 should be deleted.

RATIONALE:
	Although the Humanities minor has evidenced little student 
demand in the past, it is thought that restructure of the program 
could result in a viable minor while still providing a savings in 
resources.


3.	CONCERNING RETENTION OF CERTAIN HUMANITIES COURSES-

RECOMMENDATION:
	Humanities courses with strong demand as evidenced by 
consistent "making" of enrollment minimums and/or use as 
requirements for other programs should be retained.  In particular, 
Humanities 201 and 202 should be retained.

RATIONALE:
	Some of the Humanities courses (such as Humanities 202) are 
used in other programs and some have strong enrollments from 
students wishing to fulfill humanities requirements.  Humanities 
201 has now been modified to fulfill the Aesthetics Appreciation 
area of the core curriculum and has been approved by the Core 
Review Committee.


4.	CONCERNING SHARED CONTROL FOR HUMANITIES 201 AND 202-

	The recommendation of the CLA Curriculum Council concerning 
shared control of Humanities 201 and 202 is seen by the Curricular 
Affairs Committee as representing unwarranted intrusion into the 
academic affairs of a department and as setting undesirable 
precedent.  This provision is NOT recommended.  It should be noted 
that as part of the Aesthetics Appreciation area of the core 
curriculum, any changes in Humanities 201 do come under the 
approval authority of the Core Review Committee as is the case with 
any core course.


-------------------------------------------------------------

The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting #40 on 
March 22, 1993:


MOTION PASSED  (w/ 1 abstention)
===============


The UAF Faculty Senate moves to deny the request for deletion of the 
German Program.

The UAF Faculty Senate recommends that the new Dean, in 
conjunction with the CLA Curriculum Council, review the German 
courses to find ways to strengthen the program.  The review process 
should be completed by October 15, 1993.

The UAF Faculty Senate furthermore encourages external support for 
the program to further enhance German at UAF.



Signed:  Timothy Tilsworth, President, UAF Faculty Senate
	Date:  3/30/93


Approved:  J. Wadlow, Chancellor   	Date:  9/1/93

*See also Sept. 1, 1993 memo to Pres. Spell.


-------------------------------------------------------------

The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting #40 on 
March 22, 1993:


RESOLUTION PASSED
===================

WHEREAS, Chancellor Wadlow has requested suggestions for the 
improvement of graduate education at UAF, and based on a survey 
identifying problems in graduate education, and on input from 
academic departments, a number of concerns have been raised about 
faculty member's workload and role in graduate education; these can 
be divided into three areas:

	1.	The consideration of a faculty member's participation 
		in graduate education in the evaluation and promotion 
		of faculty members.

	2.	Faculty annual workload in relation to participation 
		in graduate student advisement and on graduate 
		committees.

	3.	Faculty annual workload in relation to the assignment 
		of graduate classes versus undergraduate classes.

The Graduate Council feels that departments and colleges must 
address these concerns in some manner.  At present a few 
departments have adopted policy concerning graduate education; 
however, many have no stated policy.  The Graduate Council offers 
these guidelines to departments to be modified as deemed necessary.

BE IT RESOLVED THAT, In response to these areas of concern, the UAF 
Faculty Senate moves to establish the following guidelines:

	1.	Each peer review unit should specify the role of faculty 
		members in graduate education in their criteria for 
		promotion and tenure.

	2.	Any faculty member who is teaching a graduate course 
		of three or more credits should not be expected to teach 
		more than one other course during that semester.  It is 
		assumed that the faculty member will also have other 
		assignments in research and service.

	3.	Faculty annual workload assignments should take into 
		account the faculty member's participation on graduate 
		student committees with the following formula:

				Preliminary 		Advanced to Candidacy

			Chair 		Member		Chair 		Member
Ph.D. or 
Masters w/thesis	.75 cr. 	.3 cr.   	1.0 cr. 	.5 cr.

Masters 
non-thesis   		.2 cr.   	.1 cr.   	  .3 cr. 	.2 cr. 



Signed:  Timothy Tilsworth, President, UAF Faculty Senate
	Date:  3/30/93


-------------------------------------------------------------

The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting #40 on 
March 22, 1993:


MOTION PASSED (w/3 abstentions)
===============

The UAF Faculty Senate moves to amend the Baccalaureate Core 
Curriculum guideline for World Literatures:  Art and Culture under 
the "Perspectives on the Human Condition" as follows:


CURRENT GUIDELINES:

WORLD LITERATURES:  ART AND CULTURE

1.	Objectives:
	a.	Introducing students to the careful reading of literary 
		texts;
	b.	Developing an appreciation of the artistic elements in 
		literature;
	c.	Understanding the range of cultural differences and 
		universals through exposure to a variety of approaches 
		to myth, poetry, story telling, and drama.

2.	Options:  This course is a broad-based literature course 
	covering a wide range of texts and representing different 
	cultures and periods from the perspective of literature as art.  
	Outline of course content:

	a.	Introduction to the role of literature in the 
		humanities and in critical thinking; overview of 
		literature in the world, cross-cultural perspectives.
	b.	Ancient Sources (including some attention to myth, 
		song, and religious texts).
	c.	Poetry (including some non-Western and American 
		minority works).
	d.	Story (including oral as well as written examples, 
		and including non-Western and American minority works, 
		and at least one novel).
	e.	Drama (including at least one play by Shakespeare).
		Four examples of possible courses which would fulfill 
		this outline, by using thematic approaches across diverse 
		cultures, time periods and literary genres, are:
		1)	Lysistrata (Aristophanes), Othello (Shakespeare), 
			Phaedre (Racine), Madame Bovary (Flaubert), Les 
			Contes d'Amadou Koumba (compiled by Bistro Diop, 
			Senegalese oral narratives)
		2)	Orestei (Aeschylus), Merchant of Venice 
			(Shakespeare), The Miser (Moliere), selected short 
			stories of Maupaussant, Mandabi (Sembene 
			Ousmane).
		3)	The Iliad or Odyssey (Homer), King Lear 
			(Shakespeare), Song of Roland (anon.), Don Quixote 
			(Cervantes), The Human Condition (Malraux).
		4)	Ancient Buddhist texts (Kazuaki's Moon in a 
			Dewdrop); Zen poetry from China, Japan and the 
			U.S.; the kaikuesque novel Kusamakura by Natsume 
			Soseki; Christian parables and Buddhist moral 
			tales; and the film Ran compared with King Lear.

AMENDED GUIDELINES:

WORLD LITERATURES:  ART AND CULTURE

1.	Objectives:
	a.	To introduce students to the diversity of oral and 
		written literature from around the world;
	b.	To develop historical and cultural awareness, aesthetic 
		appreciation, and analytical thinking, via close study of 
		literature;
	c.	To encourage global awareness by comparing literatures 
		from different cultures, continents, and eras;
	d.	To introduce a variety of approaches to myth, poetry, 
		narrative, stories, novels, nonfiction, and drama.

2.	Content:  This course is a broad-based literature course 
	covering a wide range of texts and representing several 
	cultures and centuries.  Outline of course content:
	a.	Introduction to the role of literature.  This introduction 
		will place literature in context, as a part of the 
		humanities, as an art form, and as a part of culture and 
		society.
	b.	Cross-cultural perspectives.  Literature from several 
		cultures will be studies, and students will make 
		connections and distinction based on cultural concepts.  
		Each course will include non-Western and/or American 
		minority works.
	c.	Cross-gener perspectives.  Works of literature created 
		by both women and men will be studied.
	d.	Diversity of genres.  Students will learn about several 
		genres, and about adaptations and evolution within and 
		among genres.  Each course will consider narrative (both 
		oral and written), poetry, and drama, in a variety of 
		forms, including longer forms like the novel or full-
		length plays, and briefer forms, like short stories, prose 
		poems, or lyric poems.  Traditional sources, such as 
		myths, songs, or religious texts, and more modern works 
		will be studied.


	EFFECTIVE: 	Upon Chancellor Approval

	RATIONALE:	World Literature faculty from both English 
		and Foreign Language met and discussed the guidelines 
		for World Literature.  The revised guidelines represent 
		the pedagogical concerns and the practices of the World 
		Literature faculty.  These guidelines reflect changes 
		agreed to by the Core Review Committee.  



Signed:  Timothy Tilsworth, President, UAF Faculty Senate
	Date:  3/30/93


Approved:  J. Wadlow, Chancellor   	Date:  4/2/93