The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting #120 on February 2, 2004:

MOTION:
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The UAF Faculty Senate moves to approve a Certificate in Yup'ik Language Proficiency.

EFFECTIVE: Fall 2004 and/or Upon Board of Regents' Approval.

RATIONALE: See full program proposal #128 from the Fall 2003 review cycle on file in the Governance Office, 312 Signers' Hall.

Requires 30 credits of ESK courses; offered at Kuskokwim Campus

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Brief Statement of the Proposed Program
Certificate, Yup'ik Language Proficiency

A one-year Certificate program in Yup'ik Language Proficiency will be made available to students who complete 30 credits in Yup'ik Language through the Kuskokwim Campus of the College of Rural Alaska (KUC). The program is designed for students who may not wish to pursue an A.A.S. or B.A. degree but would like recognition that they have completed a structured curriculum designed to develop basic proficiency in Yup'ik. Many students are already enrolled in Yup'ik language classes through the Kuskokwim Campus, but due to the lack of a structured degree program are forced to take these classes as general electives and are structurally discouraged from pursuing the continuous, structured language study necessary to become proficient in the language.

Courses will be offered through the Kuskokwim Campus only and will include traditional on campus classes as well as summer intensive and distance delivery options. Most on campus students will be traditional students directly out of high school pursuing entry level courses and course work toward an A.A.S. Upon completion of their degree programs many of these students will be encouraged to pursue B.A. programs through a variety of colleges and universities throughout Alaska and the lower-48. As the only institution in the world offering opportunities to pursue more advanced study in Yup'ik, it is hoped that many of these students will choose to pursue B.A. programs in Fairbanks.

Many distance delivery students will be currently employed as teacher's aides within local school districts within the Kuskokwim Campus service area. Most of these students will be non-traditional students in the sense that they are older and often with family and job responsibilities.
These students will be unable to attend courses full-time on campus. Courses targeted explicitly at these students will be offered in summer and via distance delivery and will necessarily involve local language experts from within the student's own village. This academically sound program will increase both the quality and quantity of Yup'ik language programming available through the schools and villages from which the students are drawn by providing them with a basic working knowledge of Yup'ik that they can immediately put to use within their own classrooms.

Closely linked to the Certificate is another program proposed degree program, a two-year integrated course of studies leading to an Associate of Applied Science degree in Yup'ik Language Proficiency, available to students who complete the Certificate-level courses and an additional 30 credits in related subjects including core undergraduate courses for all students pursuing the A.A.S. degree.

 

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The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting #120 on February 2, 2004:

MOTION:
=======

The UAF Faculty Senate moves to approve an A.A.S. in Yup'ik Language Proficiency.

EFFECTIVE: Fall 2004 and/orUpon Board of Regents' Approval.

RATIONALE: See full program proposal #129 from the Fall 2003 review cycle on file in the Governance Office, 312 Signers' Hall.

Requires the 30 credits of ESK coursework from the certificate and the 15 credits of required related
instruction for the AAS for a total of 60 credits; offered at Kuskokwim Campus

 

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Brief Statement of the Proposed Program
A.A.S., Yup'ik Language Proficiency

A two-year Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) program in Yup'ik Language Proficiency designed for students who have completed, or intend to complete, the 30-credit Certificate program and would like to proceed on to a higher level. Students will complete 30 credits in Yup'ik Language through the Kuskokwim Campus of the College of Rural Alaska (KUC), followed by an additional 30 credits of University requirements for the A.A.S.

Many students are already enrolled in Yup'ik language classes through the Kuskokwim Campus, but due to the lack of a structured degree program are forced to take these classes as general electives and are structurally discouraged from pursuing the continuous, structured language study necessary to become proficient in the language.

Core courses will be offered through the Kuskokwim Campus only and will include traditional on campus classes as well as summer intensive and distance delivery options. Most on campus students will be traditional students directly out of high school pursuing entry level courses and course work toward an A.A.S. Upon completion of their degree programs many of these students will be encouraged to pursue B.A. programs through a variety of colleges and universities throughout Alaska and the lower-48. As the only institution in the world offering opportunities to pursue more advanced study in Yup'ik, it is hoped that many of these students will choose to pursue B.A. programs in Fairbanks.

Many distance delivery students will be currently employed as teacher's aides within local school districts within the Kuskokwim Campus service area. Most of these students will be non-traditional students in the sense that they are older and often with family and job responsibilities. These students will be unable to attend courses full-time on campus. Courses targeted explicitly at these students will be offered in summer and via distance delivery and will necessarily involve local language experts from within the student's own village. This academically sound program will increase both the quality and quantity of Yup'ik language programming available through the schools and villages from which the students are drawn by providing them with a basic working knowledge of Yup'ik that they can immediately put to use within their own classrooms.

The proposed A.A.S. will allow students to progress beyond the 30-credit Certificate and earn a two-year degree in Yup'ik Language Proficiency, attesting to a higher degree of academic preparation. The A.A.S. is again designed for both traditional and non-traditional students. For traditional students the A.A.S. will provide a structured stepping stone to advanced study of Yup'ik at UAF as well as a variety of B.A. degree options, including (but not limited to) Alaska Native and Rural Development, Linguistics, Alaska Native Studies. For non-traditional students the A.A.S. will provide courses to enhance local school and community programming for Yup'ik language and culture.

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The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting #120 on February 2, 2004:

MOTION:
=======

The UAF Faculty Senate moves to approve the Unit Criteria for the School of Education (SOEd).

EFFECTIVE: Immediately Upon Chancellor Approval

RATIONALE: The committee assessed the unit criteria submitted by the School of Education (SOEd). With some
changes, agreed upon by the school representative, Delena Norris-Tull, the unit criteria were found to be
consistent with UAF guidelines.

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Approved by the Unit 12/3/03

UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA FAIRBANKS
REGULATIONS FOR THE EVALUATION OF FACULTY
AND
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION UNIT CRITERIA STANDARDS AND INDICES

THE FOLLOWING IS AN ADAPTATION OF UAF AND REGENTS CRITERIA FOR PROMOTION AND TENURE, SPECIFICALLY DEVELOPED FOR USE IN EVALUATING THE FACULTY IN THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION. ITEMS IN CAPITAL LETTERS ARE THOSE SPECIFICALLY ADDED OR EMPHASIZED BECAUSE OF THEIR RELEVANCE TO THE SCHOOL’S FACULTY, AND BECAUSE THEY ARE ADDITIONS TO AND CLARIFICATION OF UAF REGULATIONS. THESE UNIT CRITERIA ARE FOR USE IN THE ANNUAL EVALUATION OF FACULTY AS WELL.

PERIODIC EVALUATION OF FACULTY

A. General Criteria
As outlined in UAF Faculty Policies, Chapter IV. evaluators may consider, but shall not be limited to, whichever of the following are appropriate to the faculty member's professional obligation: mastery of subject matter; effectiveness in teaching; achievement in research, scholarly, and creative activity; effectiveness of public service; effectiveness of university service; demonstration of professional development and quality of total contribution to the university.

For purposes of evaluation at UAF, the total contribution to the university and activity in the areas outlined above will be defined by relevant activity and demonstrated competence from the following areas: 1) effectiveness in teaching; 2) achievement in scholarly activity; and 3) effectiveness of service.

Bipartite Faculty.
Bipartite faculty are regular academic rank faculty who fill positions that are designated as performing two of the three parts of the university's tripartite responsibility.

The dean or director of the relevant college/school shall determine which of the criteria defined above apply to these faculty.
Bipartite faculty may voluntarily engage in a tripartite function, but they will not be required to do so as a condition for evaluation, promotion, or tenure.

B. Criteria for Instruction
A central function of the university is instruction of students in formal courses and supervised study. Teaching includes those activities directly related to the formal and informal transmission of appropriate skills and knowledge to students. The nature of instruction will vary for each faculty member, depending upon workload distribution and the particular teaching mission of the unit. Instruction includes actual contact in classroom, correspondence or electronic delivery methods, laboratory or field and preparatory activities, such as preparing for lectures, setting up demonstrations, and preparing for laboratory experiments, as well as individual/independent study, tutorial sessions, evaluations, correcting papers, and determining grades. Other aspects of teaching and instruction extend to undergraduate and graduate academic advising and counseling, training graduate students and serving on their graduate committees, particularly as their major advisor, curriculum development, and academic recruiting and retention activities.

IN ADDITION TO THE UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY, SCHOOL OF EDUCATION FACULTY SERVE ALASKA’S SCHOOL DISTRICTS. MUCH OF OUR TEACHING, RESEARCH, AND SERVICE ARE CONDUCTED IN AND FOR SCHOOLS. WE THEREFORE SERVE THREE CONSTITUENCIES – UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENTS; OUR PROFESSIONAL RESEARCH COMMUNITY; AND K-12 SCHOOLS, INCLUDING DISTRICTS, TEACHERS, K-12 STUDENTS, AND THEIR FAMILIES AND COMMUNITIES.

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION PROGRAMS AND COURSES ARE RESPONSIVE TO STATE LICENSURE REQUIREMENTS, NATIONAL ACCREDITATION REQUIREMENTS, AND STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION AND UA BOARD OF REGENTS' MANDATES FOR THE PREPARATION OF K-12 TEACHERS, COUNSELORS, AND ADMINISTRATORS. THESE REQUIREMENTS CHANGE PERIODICALLY, WHICH REQUIRES REGULAR REVISION TO OUR CURRICULA. THUS CURRICULAR REVISION IS A REGULAR ASPECT OF THE INSTRUCTIONAL ROLE OF FACULTY.

FOR SOME FACULTY, ADVISING AND RECRUITING STUDENTS IS A REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITY. FACULTY RESPONSIBLE FOR ADVISING REMOTELY-LOCATED STUDENTS TYPICALLY PROVIDE NUMEROUS SUPPLEMENTAL SERVICES TO STUDENTS, WHICH MAY INCLUDE PROVIDING INFORMATION ON FINANCIAL AID, PLACEMENT TESTS, REGISTRATION, TUTORING, AND UNIVERSITY ADMISSIONS. THESE ACTIVITIES MAKE ADVISING OF REMOTELY-LOCATED STUDENTS A TIME-CONSUMING ACTIVITY, WHICH SHOULD BE TAKEN INTO CONSIDERATION IN THE TENURE AND PROMOTION PROCESS.

1. Effectiveness in Teaching
Evidence of excellence in teaching may be demonstrated through, but not limited to, evidence of the various characteristics which define effective teachers. Effective teachers:

a. are highly organized, plan carefully, use class time efficiently, have clear objectives, have high expectations for students.

b. express positive regard for students, develop good rapport with students, show interest/enthusiasm for the subject.

c. emphasize and encourage student participation, ask questions, frequently monitor student participation for student learning and teacher effectiveness, are sensitive to student diversity.

d. emphasize regular feedback to students and reward student learning success;

e. demonstrate content mastery, discuss current information and divergent points of view, relate topics to other disciplines, deliver material at the appropriate level.

f. regularly develop new courses, workshops and seminars and use a variety of methods of instructional delivery and instructional design.

g. DEVELOP EFFECTIVE CURRICULAR MATERIALS AND MODES OF INSTRUCTION.

h. may receive prizes and awards for excellence in teaching.

i. MAY ENGAGE IN DIVERSE INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES SUCH AS TEACHING AT RURAL OR BRANCH CAMPUSES, TEACHING DISTANCE DELIVERED COURSES, TEACHING IN SUMMER SCHOOL, AND DEVELOPMENT OF CURRICULUM MATERIALS FOR COURSES, SUCH AS THOSE UNIQUELY SUITED TO ALASKAN SCHOOLS.

j. MAY PROVIDE SUPERVISION OF STUDENTS DURING FORMAL CLINICAL PRACTICE, STUDENT TEACHING, OR INTERNSHIPS.

k. MAY INVOLVE STUDENTS, UNDERGRADUATES AS WELL AS GRADUATES, IN RESEARCH ACTIVITIES.

l. ARE EFFECTIVE IN ADVISING, MENTORING, AND RECRUITING STUDENTS.

 

2. Components of Evaluation
Effectiveness in teaching AND OTHER INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES will be evaluated through information on formal and informal teaching, course and curriculum materials, recruiting and advising, training/guiding graduate students, etc., provided by:

a. systematic student ratings (i.e. student opinion of instruction summary forms),
and at least two of the following:
b. narrative self-evaluation.
c. peer/department chair classroom OR ALTERNATIVE SETTING observation(s) of teaching.
d. peer/department chair evaluation of course materials.

ADDITIONAL SOURCES OF EVIDENCE OF EFFECTIVENESS IN TEACHING MAY CONSIST OF BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO:

e. A CLASS PRE TEST AT THE BEGINNING OF THE SEMESTER FOLLOWED BY A POST TEST OF SIMILAR FORMAT AT THE END OF THE SEMESTER OR YEAR TO ASSESS STUDENT PROGRESS.

f. EXAMPLES OF STUDENT PROGRESS OR SKILLS, REPRESENTED BY IMPROVEMENTS IN EARLY AND LATE SEMESTER SKILLS OR PRODUCTS, OR OTHER MECHANISMS THAT CAN DOCUMENT IMPROVEMENT.

g. INSTRUCTOR- OR STUDENT-DESIGNED STUDENT OPINION OF INSTRUCTION SUMMARY.

h. LETTERS OF SUPPORT FROM STUDENTS OR PEERS.

SPECIFIC SOE CRITERIA FOR INSTRUCTIONAL PERFORMANCE BEFORE APPOINTMENT OR PROMOTION TO:

A. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: EVIDENCE OF TEACHING ABILITY AND A
COMMITMENT TO QUALITY TEACHING AND EVIDENCE OF CONTINUED IMPROVEMENT.

B. ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: THE RECORD MUST SHOW THAT THE MATERIAL TAUGHT IS RELEVANT AND THAT THE PRESENTATIONS STIMULATE THE LEARNING PROCESS. EVIDENCE OF THE EXPECTED QUALITY OF INSTRUCTIONAL PERFORMANCE MAY INCLUDE (BUT NOT LIMITED TO) COURSE AND/OR CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT, NOVEL APPROACHES TO INSTRUCTION, EFFECTIVE ADVISING AND MENTORING OF STUDENTS, EFFECTIVE CLASSROOM TEACHING PERFORMANCE, AND/OR EVIDENCE OF SUPERVISION OF GRADUATE STUDENT RESEARCH (AS A MAJOR SUPERVISOR OR COSUPERVISOR) LEADING TO SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF THE DEGREE PROGRAM.

C. PROFESSOR: SIGNIFICANT CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM ARE EXPECTED. THESE MAY INCLUDE, BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO: CONTRIBUTIONS TO MAJOR IMPROVEMENTS IN COURSE AND/OR CURRICULUM OFFERINGS, ABILITY TO MOTIVATE AND/OR INSPIRE STUDENTS, RECEIPT OF AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING, LEADERSHIP IN DIRECTING GRADUATE STUDENTS’ RESEARCH, SIGNIFICANT EXPERIENCE AS GRADUATE COMMITTEE CHAIR LEADING TO SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAM(S), AND/OR EFFECTIVE RECRUITMENT OR RETENTION OF STUDENTS, AS EVIDENCED BY LETTERS OF SUPPORT FROM ADVISEES OR OTHER ADVISORS.

C. Criteria for Research, Scholarly, and Creative Activity
Inquiry and originality are central functions of a land grant/sea grant/space grant university and all faculty with a research component in their assignment must remain active as scholars. Consequently, faculty are expected to conduct research or engage in other scholarly or creative pursuits that are appropriate to the mission of their unit, and equally important, results of their work must be disseminated through media appropriate to their discipline. Furthermore, it is important to emphasize the distinction between routine production and creative excellence as evaluated by an individual's peers at the University of Alaska and elsewhere.

IN ADDITION TO THE UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY, SCHOOL OF EDUCATION FACULTY SERVE ALASKA’S SCHOOL DISTRICTS. MUCH OF OUR TEACHING, RESEARCH, AND SERVICE ARE CONDUCTED IN AND FOR SCHOOLS. WE THEREFORE SERVE THREE CONSTITUENCIES – UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENTS; OUR PROFESSIONAL RESEARCH COMMUNITY; AND K-12 SCHOOLS, INCLUDING DISTRICTS, TEACHERS, K-12 STUDENTS, AND THEIR FAMILIES AND COMMUNITIES.

1. Achievement in Research, Scholarly and Creative Activity
Whatever the contribution, research, scholarly or creative activities must have one or more of the following characteristics:

a. They must occur in a public forum.
b. They must be evaluated by appropriate peers.
c. They must be evaluated by peers external to this institution so as to allow an objective judgment.
d. They must be judged to make a contribution.

2. Components of Research, Scholarly and Creative Activity
Evidence of excellence in research, scholarly, and creative activity may be demonstrated through, but ARE not limited to AN ASSORTMENT OF THE FOLLOWING ITEMS THAT THE UNIT CONSIDERS TO BE MOST VALUABLE FOR CONSIDERATION FOR PROMOTION AND TENURE:

a. Books, BOOK CHAPTERS, EDITED BOOKS, reviews, monographs, bulletins, articles, proceedings and other scholarly works published by reputable journals, scholarly presses, and publishing houses, INCLUDING ELECTRONIC JOURNALS AND PRESSES, that accept works only after rigorous review and approval by peers in the discipline.

b. Competitive grants and contracts to finance the development of ideas; these grants and contracts being subject to rigorous peer review and approval.

c. Presentation of research papers OR INVITED PAPERS before learned societies that accept papers only after rigorous review and approval by peers.

d. Exhibitions of art works at galleries; selection for these exhibitions being based on rigorous review and approval by juries, recognized artists, or critics.

e. Performances in recitals or productions RELATED TO THE FIELD OF EDUCATION; selection for these performances being based on stringent auditions and approval by appropriate judges.

f. Development of processes or instruments useful in solving problems, such as EDUCATIONAL MODELS, computer programs and systems for the processing of data, genetic plant and animal material, and where appropriate obtaining patents and/or copyrights for said development.

g. BOOKS, BOOK CHAPTERS, EDITED BOOKS, REVIEWS, MONOGRAPHS, BULLETINS, ARTICLES, PROCEEDINGS AND OTHER SCHOLARLY WORKS PUBLISHED BY REPUTABLE JOURNALS, SCHOLARLY PRESSES, AND PUBLISHING HOUSES, INCLUDING ELECTRONIC JOURNALS AND PRESSES, THAT ACCEPT WORKS ONLY AFTER RIGOROUS REVIEW AND APPROVAL BY EDITORIAL BOARDS.

h. REFERREED RESEARCH ARTICLES AND REPORTS OF PRACTICE IN EDUCATION APPEARING IN PUBLICATIONS DESIGNED FOR EDUCATION PRACTITIONERS (SUCH AS JOURNALS DESIGNED FOR K-12 TEACHERS, ADMINISTRATORS OR SCHOOL COUNSELORS).

i. TEXTBOOKS, CURRICULA, OR CURRICULA MATERIALS FOR K-12 SCHOOLS OR COLLEGES THAT RESULT IN PUBLICATIONS THAT ARE PEER REVIEWED OR EDITORIAL BOARD REVIEWED.

j. NATIONAL AND STATE EDUCATIONAL POLICY AND PLANNING THAT RESULTS IN PEER REVIEWED OR EDITORIAL BOARD REVIEWED PUBLICATION.

k. PRODUCTION OF VIDEOTAPES OR MULTIMEDIA DIGITAL WORKS REVIEWED BY PEERS IN THE DISCIPLINE.

ADDITIONAL PIECES OF EVIDENCE CONSIST OF BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO:

a. Editing or refereeing articles or proposals for professional journals or organizations.

b. Scholarly reviews of publications, art works and performance of the candidate.

c. Citations of research in scholarly publications.

d. Published abstracts of research papers.

e. Reprints or quotations of publications, reproductions of art works, and descriptions of interpretations in the performing arts, these materials appearing in reputable works of the discipline.

f. Prizes and awards for excellence of scholarship.

g. Awards of special fellowships for research or artistic activities or selection of tours of duty at special institutes for advanced study.

h. PRESENTATION OF INVITED PAPERS, RESEARCH, OR REPORTS OF BEST PRACTICE IN EDUCATION BEFORE LEARNED SOCIETIES.

i. INVITED EDITORIALS PUBLISHED IN SCHOLARLY WORKS.

j. PRODUCTION OF EDUCATIONAL VIDEOTAPES OR MULTIMEDIA DIGITAL WORKS REVIEWED AND UTILIZED BY SCHOOL PERSONNEL, COLLEGES, OR COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS.

k. INVITED PERFORMANCES AND PRODUCTIONS RELATED TO EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH OR PRACTICE IN EDUCATION REQUESTED BY SCHOOLS, COLLEGES, OR COMMUNITIES.

l. DEVELOPMENT OF CURRICULA OR CURRICULA MATERIALS WHICH ARE REVIEWED AND UTILIZED BY STATE OR LOCAL AGENCIES, SCHOOL DISTRICTS OR COMMUNITY BOARDS.

m. PUBLICATIONS, PRODUCTS, AND POLICY IMPLEMENTED FOLLOWING REVIEW BY NATIONAL, STATE AND LOCAL AGENCIES OR COMMITTEES, SCHOOL DISTRICTS AND COMMUNITY BOARDS OR AGENCIES.

n. PROFESSIONAL REPORTS REVIEWED BY PEERS IN STATE AND NATIONAL EDUCATION ORGANIZATIONS, REQUIRED FOR ACCREDITATION PURPOSES.

SPECIFIC SOE CRITERIA FOR SCHOLARLY PERFORMANCE BEFORE APPOINTMENT OR PROMOTION TO:

A. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: EVIDENCE OF THE ABILITY TO ESTABLISH A VIABLE RESEARCH, SCHOLARLY, OR CREATIVE PROGRAM IN THE AREA OF SPECIALIZATION.

B. ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: MUST HAVE ESTABLISHED AN APPROPRIATE RESEARCH, SCHOLARLY, OR CREATIVE PROGRAM AS EVIDENCED BY ANY OF THE FOLLOWING: REFEREED PROFESSIONAL JOURNALS, BOOKS, BOOK CHAPTERS, AND/OR EDITED BOOKS PEER REVIEWED OR REVIEWED BY AN EDITORIAL BOARD, PROFESSIONAL REPORTS OR SCHOLARLY PRODUCTS, CURRICULAR MATERIALS, OR OTHER APPROPRIATE CREATIVE PRODUCTS IN THE FIELD OF SPECIALIZATION.

THE SUBMISSION OF RESEARCH PROPOSALS, THE COMPLETION OF CONTRACT RESEARCH REPORTS, AND PUBLICATION IN CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS CONSTITUTE SUPPLEMENTARY EVIDENCE THAT THE SCHOLARLY PROGRAM IS OF HIGH QUALITY. MUST SHOW EVIDENCE OF SUSTAINED SCHOLARLY PRODUCTIVITY. THE FACULTY MEMBER SHOWS INDEPENDENCE AND LEADERSHIP BY THE CREATION OF SCHOLARLY IDEAS THAT INVOLVE COLLABORATIONS WITH PEERS IN THEIR FIELD OF SPECIALIZATION, STUDENTS, SCHOOL PERSONNEL OR PERSONNEL IN STATE OR NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS.

RESEARCH AND SCHOLARLY ACTIVITY IN EDUCATION IS NOTABLY COLLABORATIVE IN NATURE. THUS IT IS CONSIDERED COMMON PRACTICE IN THE FIELD TO PRODUCE PUBLICATIONS OR OTHER PRODUCTS COLLABORATIVELY. TO DEMONSTRATE A CONSISTENT FLOW OF RESEARCH, A FACULTY MEMBER WHO HAS COMPLETED WORK BEFORE APPOINTMENT CAN COUNT UP TO THREE PUBLICATIONS OR OTHER PRODUCTS TOWARD PROMOTION.

C. PROFESSOR: THE SCHOLARLY PROGRAM SHOULD HAVE PRODUCED CLEAR EVIDENCE THAT CANDIDATE IS A LEADER IN THEIR FIELD. PUBLICATIONS AND OTHER PRODUCTS SHOULD BE OF SUFFICIENT QUALITY AND QUANTITY TO DEMONSTRATE THE EXISTENCE OF AN ON-GOING, PROFESSIONAL SCHOLARLY PROGRAM. A NATIONAL OR INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION (AS DEMONSTRATED BY PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES OR PRESENTATIONS AT MEETINGS, THE RECEIPT OF AWARDS, AND DOCUMENTED OPINIONS OF OTHERS IN THE FIELD) IS EXPECTED. THERE SHOULD BE A RECORD OF SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF GRADUATE WORK BY HIS OR HER STUDENTS. THERE SHOULD BE DEMONSTRATED EVIDENCE OF EXTERNAL RESEARCH FUNDING.

D. Criteria for Public and University Service
Public service is intrinsic to the land grant/sea grant/space grant tradition, and is a fundamental part of the university's obligation to the people of its state. In this tradition, faculty providing their professional expertise for the benefit of the university's external constituency, free of charge, is identified as "public service." The tradition of the university itself provides that its faculty assumes a collegial obligation for the internal functioning of the institution; such service is identified as "university service."

1. Public Service
Public service is the application of teaching, research, and other scholarly and creative activity to constituencies outside the University of Alaska Fairbanks. It includes all activities which extend the faculty member's professional, academic, or leadership competence to these constituencies. It can be instructional, collaborative, or consultative in nature and is related to the faculty member's discipline or other publicly recognized expertise. Public service may be systematic activity that involves planning with clientele and delivery of information on a continuing, programmatic basis. It may also be informal, individual, professional contributions to the community or to one's discipline, or other activities in furtherance of the goals and mission of the university and its units; such service may occur on a periodic or limited-term basis. Examples include, but are not limited to:

a. Providing information services to adults or youth.

b. Service on or to government or public committees.

c. Service on accrediting bodies.

d. Active participation in professional organizations.

e. Active participation in discipline-oriented service organizations.

f. Consulting.

g. Prizes and awards for excellence in public service.

h. Leadership of or presentations at workshops, conferences, or public meetings.

i. Training and facilitating.

j. Radio and TV programs, newspaper articles and columns, publications, newsletters, films, computer applications, teleconferences and othereducational media, NON-REVIEWED CURRICULAR MATERIALS, INFORMATIONAL BULLETINS, JOURNALS AND NEWSLETTERS UTILIZED BY STATE OR LOCAL AGENCIES, SCHOOL DISTRICTS OR COMMUNITY BOARDS.

k. Judging and similar educational assistance at science fairs, state fairs, and speech, drama, literary, and similar competitions.

l. PROVIDING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FOR K-12 TEACHERS AND OTHER K-12 SCHOOL PERSONNEL AND COMMUNITY MEMBERS.

2 . University Service
University service includes those activities involving faculty members in the governance, administration, and other internal affairs of the university, its colleges, schools, and institutes. It includes non-instructional work with students and their organizations. Examples of such activity include, but are not limited to:

a. Service on university, college, school, institute, or departmental committees or governing bodies.

b. Consultative work in support of university functions, such as expert assistance for specific projects.

c. Service as department head or term-limited and part-time assignment as assistant/associate dean in a college/school.

d. Participation in accreditation reviews.

e. Service on collective bargaining unit committees or elected office.

f. Service in support of student organizations and activities.

g. Academic support services such as library and museum programs.

h. Assisting other faculty or units with curriculum planning and delivery of instruction, such as serving as guest lecturer.

i. Mentoring faculty.

j. Prizes and awards for excellence in university service.

3. Evaluation of Service
Each individual faculty member’s proportionate responsibility in service shall be reflected in annual workload agreements. In formulating criteria, standards and indices for evaluation, promotion, and tenure, individual units should include examples of service activities and measures for evaluation appropriate for that unit. Excellence in public and university service may be demonstrated through, e.g., appropriate letters of commendation, recommendation, and/or appreciation, certificates and awards and other public means of recognition for services rendered.

SOE FACULTY TYPICALLY DEVOTE A SIGNIFICANT PERCENTAGE OF THEIR ACTIVITIES TO SERVICE. DUE TO UA BOARD OF REGENTS' AND OTHER UA ADMINISTRATIVE MANDATES, ALASKA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION AND EARLY DEVELOPMENT LICENSURE REQUIREMENTS, AND THE REQUIREMENTS OF NATIONAL ACCREDITATION, FACULTY HAVE RESPONSIBILITIES TO NUMEROUS COLLABORATIVE RELATIONSHIPS WITH ENTITIES EXTERNAL AND INTERNAL TO THE UNIT. SOME COLLABORATIONS RESULT IN FREQUENT TRAVEL AND SERVICE ON NUMEROUS COMMITTEES. THESE ACTIVITIES ARE OF GREAT IMPORTANCE TO THE UNIT AND SHOULD BE EVALUATED AS SUCH.
SPECIFIC SOE CRITERIA FOR SERVICE PERFORMANCE BEFORE PROMOTION OR APPOINTMENT TO:

A. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: EVIDENCE OF UNIVERSITY/PUBLIC SERVICE

B. ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: CONTRIBUTIONS TO DEPARTMENT/SCHOOL/ COLLEGE/UNIVERSITY MATTERS.
CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PUBLIC, INDUSTRY, GOVERNMENT AGENCIES AND SERVICE TO THE PROFESSION.

C. PROFESSOR: EVIDENCE OF LEADERSHIP IN THE SERVICE AREA IS EXPECTED. CONTRIBUTIONS TO DEPARTMENTAL/SCHOOL/COLLEGE/ UNIVERSITY MATTERS ARE EXPECTED AS WELL AS EFFECTIVE APPLICATION OF EXPERTISE TO PROFESSIONAL AND PUBLIC ORGANIZATIONS.

THE FOLLOWING ARE EXAMPLES OF EXCELLENCE IN SERVICE :

a. INVITATIONAL SERVICE ON STATE, NATIONAL OR INTERNATIONAL BOARDS, REVIEW COMMITTEES, AWARD COMMISSIONS OR SCHOLARSHIP COMMISSIONS.

b. NATIONAL OR STATE LEADERSHIP IN A PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATION.

c. RECOGNITION THROUGH INVITATIONAL SPEAKING ENGAGEMENTS.

d. OUTSTANDING UNIVERSITY SERVICE, SUCH AS SERVING AS A FACULTY SENATE OFFICER, FACULTY SENATE COMMITTEE CHAIR OR MEMBER OF A MAJOR ADMINISTRATIVE SEARCH COMMITTEE.

e. RECOGNITION THROUGH RECEIPT OF PUBLIC SERVICE AWARDS OR AWARDS FOR SERVICE TO THE UNIVERSITY.

f. RECEIPT OF A NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OR PROFESSIONAL SOCIETY SERVICE AWARD.

E. Unit Criteria, Standards and Indices
Unit criteria, standards and indices are recognized values used by a faculty within a specific discipline to elucidate, but not replace, the general faculty criteria established in B, C, D, above, and in "UAF Faculty Appointment and Evaluation Policies," Chapter IV for evaluation of faculty performance on an ongoing basis and for promotion, tenure, 4th year comprehensive and diagnostic review (United Academics only), and post-tenure review.

Unit criteria, standards and indices may be developed by those units wishing to do so. Units that choose not to develop discipline-specific unit criteria, standards and indices must file a statement stating so with the Office of the Provost, which shall serve as the official repository for approved unit criteria, standards and indices.

A unit choosing to develop discipline-specific criteria, standards and indices shall have such criteria, standards and indices approved by a majority of the discipline faculty. The unit criteria, standards and indices will be reviewed and approved by the cognizant dean who will forward the unit criteria, standards and indices to the provost. The provost will review for consistency with BOR and UAF policies and will forward these criteria, standards and indices to the Faculty Senate, which shall review and approve all discipline-specific criteria according to a process established by the Faculty Senate.

Unit criteria, standards and indices will be reviewed at least every five (5) years by the faculty of the unit. When reorganization results in a unit’s placement in another college/school structure, the cognizant dean, in consultation with the unit faculty shall review unit criteria, standards and indices and revise if warranted. Unit criteria, standards and indices approved by the Faculty Senate prior to a unit’s reorganization shall remain in effect until reviewed and revised. Revision of unit criteria, standards and indices must follow the review process established by the Faculty Senate. If the unit criteria, standards and indices are not revised, a statement of reaffirmation of the current unit criteria, standards and indices must be filed with the Office of the Provost, following the review.

Unit criteria, standards and indices, when developed by the faculty and approved by the Faculty Senate, must be used in the review processes by all levels of review. Their use is NOT optional. It shall be the responsibility of the candidate for promotion, tenure, 4th year comprehensive and diagnostic review (United Academics only), and post-tenure review to include these approved unit criteria, standards and indices in the application file.

12/03

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The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting #120 on February 2, 2004:

MOTION:
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The UAF Faculty Senate strongly recommends that the UA Statewide Administration maintain and fully fund the Faculty Liaison position at the UA Statewide office. Furthermore, the Faculty Liaison must be a fully involved participant in UA Statewide deliberations.

EFFECTIVE: Immediately

RATIONALE: The mission of the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) states that UAF "as the nation's northernmost Land, Sea, and Space Grant university and international research center, advances and disseminates knowledge through creative teaching, research, and public service with an emphasis on Alaska, the North and their diverse peoples." Faculty are the heart of the university and the driving force for accomplishing UAF and UA's mission because the faculty teach the students, perform the research, and engage in community and university service. Faculty input in Statewide matters is crucial for accomplishing our mission and ensuring a balanced and successful future for the university. Furthermore, the Faculty Liaison is a crucial link between the UAF Faculty and the Statewide Administration by being present during UA Statewide deliberations, by providing a largely non-academic Statewide Administration with an academic and faculty point of view, and by reporting Statewide issues to the faculty.

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The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting #120 on February 2, 2004:

RESOLUTION:
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WHEREAS, The Faculty Senate Budget Liaison Report dated 24 April 2003 was presented to the UAF Faculty Senate on 5 May 2003; and

WHEREAS, The major conclusions of this report indicate that on average funds for the executive administrative purposes increased 3.5-fold compared to funds allocated for academic purposes during a 5-year period from fiscal year 1998 (FY98) through FY02; and

WHEREAS, In this report, the Budget Liaison strongly encouraged the UAF Administration, i.e., Provost Reichardt and Chancellor Lind, to give a rationale for the disproportionate growth of executive administration at UAF in Fairbanks; and

WHEREAS, The UAF Faculty Senate president-elect requested a written justification for the disproportionate growth of executive administration at UAF from the UAF Administration during the 27 October 2003 Faculty Senate meeting, to be presented during the 8 December 2003 Faculty Senate meeting; and

WHEREAS, The UAF Administration has not provided such a written justification to date;

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, That the UAF Faculty Senate will assume that the UAF Administration agrees with the recommendations expressed in the 24 April 2003 Budget Liaison Report if a detailed written justification is not received by 5 April 2004; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, That the UAF Faculty Senate subsequently expects the UAF Administration to act upon these recommendations and cut executive administration budgets by twice the amount (as specified in the report) compared to academic budgets in the next budget year.

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The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting #120 on February 2, 2004:

MOTION:
=======

The UAF Faculty Senate moves to amend Section 3, (Article V, Committees, Permanent) of the Bylaws pertaining to the Developmental Studies Committee and Curriculum Review Committee membership.

[[ ]] - Deletion
CAPS - Addition

[[2. The Developmental Studies Committee will include one representative from each of the following units: Northwest Campus; Chukchi Campus; Kuskokwim Campus; Bristol Bay Campus; Interior-Aleutians Campus; College of Science, Engineering and Mathematics: Science Department (Biology, Chemistry, Geology, or Physics), and Mathematics Department; the College of Liberal Arts: English Department, and Cross-Cultural Communications Department; the College of Rural Alaska Developmental Studies Division; Rural Student Services; Advising Center; Student Support Services Program; and two representatives from the Tanana Valley Campus.]]

2. THE DEVELOPMENTAL STUDIES COMMITTEE WILL INCLUDE ONE REPRESENTATIVE FROM EACH OF THE FOLLOWING UNITS: ACADEMIC ADVISING CENTER, BRISTOL BAY CAMPUS, CHUKCHI CAMPUS, THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS ENGLISH DEPARTMENT, INTERIOR-ALEUTIANS CAMPUS, KUSKOKWIM CAMPUS, NORTHWEST CAMPUS, STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES PROGRAM, AND TANANA VALLEY CAMPUS; TWO REPRESENTATIVES FROM THE COLLEGE OF SCIENCE, ENGINEERING AND MATHEMATICS: ONE FROM THE SCIENCES (BIOLOGY, CHEMISTRY, GEOLOGY, OR PHYSICS) AND ONE FROM MATH; AND THREE REPRESENTATIVES FROM THE COLLEGE OF RURAL ALASKA: ONE FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF DEVELOPMENTAL EDUCATION, ONE FROM RURAL STUDENT SERVICES, AND ONE FROM RURAL CAMPUS STUDENT SERVICES.

The Developmental Studies Committee shall consider policies concerning developmental education: programs, courses, instructional development, evaluation, and assessment. This committee will function as a curriculum council/review committee for all developmental [[studies]] EDUCATION courses. [[Discipline based]] Developmental EDUCATION courses will be reviewed by the appropriate college curriculum council before submission to this committee for review and coordination.

5. The Curriculum Review Committee evaluates proposed substantive undergraduate course and program additions, changes, and deletions submitted by the appropriate school/college curriculum committees.

Among the topics of its review are number and duplication of courses, credit assignment, establishment of need for new programs, and resource impacts of curricular changes. Decisions of the Curriculum Review Committee may be appealed to the Curricular Affairs by the department submitting the proposal.

The Committee shall be composed of the chairs of the college/school curriculum councils, [[the chair of the Developmental Studies Committee,]] the University Registrar or the Registrar's designee, and shall be chaired by a member of the Curricular Affairs Committee.

EFFECTIVE: Immediately

RATIONALE: Restructuring the College of Rural Alaska has led to the formation of the Department of
Developmental Education and rural Student Support Services. It also includes Rural Student Services.
The Developmental Studies Committee needs to be restructured to reflect these changes and keep a
balanced composition of all interested units.

The chair of the Developmental Studies Committee no longer needs to be a member of the Curriculum Review
Committee.

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The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting #120 on February 2, 2004:

MOTION:
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The UAF Faculty Senate moves to endorse the Faculty Alliance report on the targets for the established outcomes based budgeting measures.