The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting #119 on December 8, 2003:

MOTION:
=======

The UAF Faculty Senate moves to approve a minor in Leadership and Civic Engagement.

EFFECTIVE: Fall 2004

RATIONALE: See full program proposal #43 on
file in the Governance Office, 312 Signers’ Hall.
Requires two new courses, NORS 205 and 492,
plus three electives from select PS, HIST, or RD
courses for a total of 15 credits.

***************

Brief Description of the Proposed Program
Minor in Leadership and Civic Engagement

The minor in leadership and civic engagement will be administered by the Northern Studies Program,an interdisciplinary program housed within the College of Liberal Arts on the University of Alaska Fairbanks campus. Its purpose is tostrengthen the abilities of UAF graduates to lead and contribute effectively in both the public and private spheres, especially in the Alaska public policy context.

 

******************************
The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting #119 on December 8, 2003:

MOTION:
======

The UAF Faculty Senate moves to approve a BA in Social Studies.

EFFECTIVE: Fall 2004 and/or
Upon Board of Regents' Approval.

RATIONALE: See full program proposal #26 from the
Spring 2003 review cycle on file in the Governance
Office, 312 Signers’ Hall.

The Interdisciplinary degree requires 3 of the Core
"Perspective" courses, 14 major requirement courses,
one elective from five social studies categories, a
concentration in a social studies area, and a capstone
experience of 6 credits for a total of 120 credits.

***************

Brief Statement of the Proposed Program
Bachelor of Arts in Social Studies

Bachelor of Arts in Social Studies. The social studies interdisciplinary degree provides students with a broad background in various disciplines of social studies, including Anthropology, Alaska Native Studies, Economics, Geography, History, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology, while providing depth in at least one of the social studies disciplines. The degree, combined with the one-year UAF School of Education post-baccalaureate teacher licensure program, is designed to prepare students to become effective social studies teachers.

The National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) requires teachers who are certified in any of the social studies disciplines (for example, Anthropology, Economics, Geography, History, Political Science, Psychology, or Sociology) to have a background in a significant number of courses outside of their specific discipline. Those students would find that a double major, combining a field such as history with the social studies major, would provide them with the broad background required by NCATE, and with the academic background required by the No Child Left Behind legislation, to enable them to teach in more than one subject area.

The objectives of the creation of the new degree are two-fold: (1) to provide a broad background in a variety of disciplines, so as to better prepare secondary teachers to teach a variety of social studies subjects than would a major in a single field alone; (2) to prepare students with the broad background in the social studies required by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the National Council of Social Studies.

 

******************************
The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting #119 on December 8, 2003:

MOTION:
======

The UAF Faculty Senate moves to amend the Bachelor of Technology degree to eliminate the business option (4a).

EFFECTIVE: Fall 2004

RATIONALE: The School of Management does not recognize
the B.T. as a business option. Removing the business option
from the BT will avoid conflict with AACSB accreditation issues
where SOM reviews all business management courses. The
Interdisciplinary degree can incorporated these courses with
SOM approval.

******************

[[ ]] = Deletions
CAPS = AdditionTechnology

Interdisciplinary Program
(907) 474-7464
Degree: B.T.
Minimum Requirements for Degree: 120 credits

This program offers qualified applicants the opportunity to expand upon their vocational/technical education. [[The B.T. degree allows students to choose business or interdisciplinary studies.]]

[[Business enhances managerial/entrepreneurial skills.]] THE Interdisciplinary studies B.T. DEGREE allows the exceptional student to tailor a baccalaureate program to their unique needs. Information and advising for this degree is through the VICE PROVOST FOR INSTRUCTIONAL AFFAIRS.

Undergraduate Program
Major
Technology -- B.T. Degree

1. Complete the general university requirements. [[As part of the core curriculum requirements, complete MATH 161X.]]

2. Complete the following B.T. degree requirements.

3. Complete the following:

ENGL 314W,O/2 -- Technical Writing (3 credits)
MATH/CS/STAT elective at the 100-level (3 credits)
TTCH 301 -- Technology and Society (3 credits)
Computer competency (3 credits)
Specialty Electives (6 credits)
(Advisor approved upper division internship or advanced technical
experience.)

4. Complete [[1 of the following specialization options:*]] 30 CREDITS OF INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES APPROVED BY A FACULTY COMMITTEE.* 30 CREDITS

[[a. Complete the following:*

ACCT 261 -- Accounting Concepts and Uses I (3 credits)
ACCT 262 -- Accounting Concepts and Uses II (3 credits)
BA 151 -- Introduction to Business (3 credits)
ECON 200 -- Principles of Economics (4 credits)
STAT 200 -- Elementary Probability and Statistics (3 credits)
Complete 5 courses from the following:
BA 307 -- Personnel Management (3 credits)
BA 317W -- Employment Law (3 credits)
BA 325 -- Financial Management (3 credits)
BA 330 -- The Legal Environment of Business (4 credits)
BA 343 -- Principles of Marketing (3 credits)
BA 390 -- Organizational Theory and Behavior (3 credits)
BA 447W,O -- Compensation Management (3 credits)
BA 457 -- Training and Management Development (3 credits)
BA 475 -- Transportation and Logistics (3 credits)

b. Interdisciplinary***]]

5. Complete 30 credits at UAF in the area of specialization (either completed in residence or accepted by transfer as equivalent to specific UAF courses).

Complete 1 of the following to demonstrate competence in the area of specialization:

a. An associate of applied science degree from an accredited institution of higher education. In general, the name of the degree shall be bachelor of technology. [[The following concentration areas are available to students who complete a UAF A.A.S. degree.
* Apprenticeship Technology
* Community Health
* Culinary Arts
* Dental Assistant
* Early Childhood Education
* Emergency Services
* Human Services
* Information Technology Specialist
* Interdisciplinary
* Maintenance Technology
* Medical Assistant
* Office Management and Technology
* Paralegal Studies
* Process Technology
* Professional Piloting
* Renewable Resources
* Tribal Management]]

b. Substitute 1 of the following [[as a demonstration of competency]] QUALIFICATIONS in an applied or technical field with the approval of the Curricular Affairs Committee of the Faculty Senate:

* A.A.S. or similar degree earned at a non-accredited institution, deemed appropriate by the faculty.
* State or federal certification deemed appropriate by the faculty.
* Journeyman status in trades and industry, deemed appropriate by the faculty.

6. Minimum credits required (120 credits)

* Student must earn a C grade or better in each course.
[[** No more than 25% of total coursework may be taken in the School of Management.]]
[[*** ]]See "Interdisciplinary Studies" in the Degrees and Programs section.
Note: At least 39 credits must be 300-level or above.

 

******************************
The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting #119 on December 8, 2003:

MOTION:
=======

The UAF Faculty Senate moves to accept the recommendation of the CORE Review Committee to amend the Natural Science requirement of the CORE Curriculum to allow "Student may complete any two Core science courses to fulfill the Core science requirement."

EFFECTIVE: Spring 2004

RATIONALE: The intent of the UAF Core science requirement is to provide students with: (1) a basic understanding of main concepts in science, (2) a solid grounding in the process of science as a way of knowing, (3) understanding of the interaction of science and society, and (4) an interest in learning more about science.

The original vision for UAF Core science courses was that students would either delve deeply into a single discipline ("depth") or they would explore two separate disciplines, each in less detail ("breadth").

The change in policy would allow maximum flexibility in course selection in the sciences by UAF students. It would not punish those students who enroll in an exploratory course (a "breadth" course), get excited about that discipline, then enroll in that discipline. It encourages faculty teaching "breadth" courses to teach exciting courses that might attract students to that discipline. Equally important, it does not "punish" students for attending UAF. We allow transfer students to bring in ANY 2 SCIENCE COURSES WITH LABS, regardless of discipline, or "breadth" vs. "depth" designation.

There is obviously some overlap of material between introductory-level courses within a discipline, but not enough to be of major concern. In addition, the area of overlap will, hopefully, cover important concepts that might well warrant repetition.

 

******************************
The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting #119 on December 8, 2003:

MOTION:
=======

The UAF Faculty Senate moves to amend the UAF Graduate Academic Standards, as published in the 2003-2004 UAF Catalog, as follows:Delete the following from p. 40 of the UAF Catalog, in the section on Academic Regulations for graduate students:

[[ Academic Standards

Good Standing

To remain in good standing, you must maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0 in courses identified on your Advancement to Candidacy. Before advancing to candidacy, however, a cumulative GPA of 3.0 is required on all courses taken since admission to graduate study. You will be placed on probation if your GPA falls below 3.0 and will remain on probation until grades are brought up to 3.0.

Academic Disqualification

Upon the recommendation of either the dean of your college or school or your advisory committee (and with the concurrence of the dean), you may be disqualified from graduate study when your performance is deemed unsatisfactory.]]Add the following section to the UAF Catalog:

START ADDITION

Academic Standards

Good Standing in UAF Graduate Degree Programs

To maintain good academic standing in UAF graduate programs, students:

a. Must maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0 in courses taken since admission to graduate school. Before advancing to candidacy, however, a cumulative GPA of 3.0 is required based on all courses identified on your Advancement to Candidacy. The student must earn at least a B grade in 400 level courses.

b. Must be registered at UAF with a minimum 6 credits per year unless on approved leave of absence.

c. Must not violate any part of the Student Code of Conduct.

d. Have a current graduate study plan or an advancement to candidacy submitted and approved, unless the student is within the first year of graduate study.

e. Have in the student's file by May 15 of each year an annual report from the graduate advisory committee, certifying satisfactory progress. This is the responsibility of the student. Students starting in January need not submit an annual report until April of the next academic year. If a satisfactory annual report is not filed as specified, the student may be placed on probation.

f. Pass any required qualifying exams or comprehensive exams. Departments may set the number of times an exam may be repeated.

Probation in UAF Graduate Degree Programs

Probationary status indicates that the student is not in good standing. When a student is placed on probation, the dean of the school or program, and the advisory committee will notify the student of requirements to be met before the student may be returned to good standing. If a student does not return to good standing by the end of two semesters, the student may be dismissed from the degree program.

Dismissal from UAF Graduate Degree Programs

If recommended by the department chair, the graduate advisory committee, and the dean of the college or school, and approved by the Dean of the Graduate School, a student will be dismissed because of unsatisfactory performance. Unsatisfactory performance is deemed as one or more of the following:

a. Exceeding maximum time limit for degree.

b. Not being registered at UAF for a minimum 6 credits per year unless on approved leave of absence.

c. Having less than 3.0 cumulative GPA on courses taken since admission to graduate school.

d. Being on probationary status for more than two consecutive semesters.

e. Violating the Student Code of Conduct.

f. Lacking progress as judged by the advisory committee and documented on the student's annual report.

g. Having substantive inaccuracies in the student’s application for admission.

If the student does not have a graduate advisory committee, dismissal can occur upon the recommendation of the department chair and the dean of the college or school, with approval by the Dean of the Graduate School.

END ADDITION

 

EFFECTIVE: Spring 2004

RATIONALE: This motion addresses the need for a clear and consistent, university-wide policy for graduate student "good standing." This need arises because of (1) current problems with removing students from programs even when they are clearly not progressing, due to the absence of a written policy defining the conditions and procedures under which this may be done; and (2) the federal government's requirement that the University report whether or not each foreign student is in "good standing." The policy proposed here is adapted from the current (brief) UAF policy as stated in the UAF Catalog, and from the CSEM draft policy addressing student status in CSEM graduate degree programs.

The description of "Good Standing" restates and clarifies existing requirements for graduate students, and applies them to students’ formal standing in graduate degree programs. It will replace the section on Good Standing for graduate students in the UAF Catalog.
The definition of "Probationary Status" is new, as there was previously no definition. The use or application of probation was unclear and therefore legally indefensible.

The description of conditions for "Dismissal" explicitly states the grounds under which a student may be dismissed, upon recommendation of the department chair, the dean of the school or program, and the Dean of the Graduate School. This will replace the section on Academic Disqualification for graduate students in the UAF Catalog. The term "Dismissal" replaces "Disqualification." The inclusion of a two-semester maximum period on probation has been added; all other grounds for dismissal are restatements of existing formal or informal policy.

 

******************************
The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting #119 on December 8, 2003:

RESOLUTION:
===========

WHEREAS, The mission of the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) states that UAF "as the nation's northernmost Land, Sea, and Space Grant university and international research center, advances and disseminates knowledge through creative teaching, research, and public service with an emphasis on Alaska, the North and their diverse peoples"; and

WHEREAS, UAF Faculty are the heart of the university and the driving force for accomplishing UAF's mission because the faculty teach the students, perform the research, and engage in community and university service; and

WHEREAS, UAF Faculty to date have not been involved in any meaningful way in the development of the University of Alaska (UA) Outcomes Based Budgeting process; and

WHEREAS, The currently proposed goals and measures/metrics of the UA Outcomes Based Budgeting process are based almost exclusively on economic indicators instead of on academic excellence and a sound long-term academic vision; and

WHEREAS, Infrastructure needs to make the UA Outcomes Based Budgeting process feasible have not been proposed; now

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, That the UAF Faculty Senate rejects the current Outcomes Based Budgeting process as directed by the UA Statewide Administration; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, That the UAF Faculty Senate demands that the UA Statewide Administration include UAF Faculty in the decision making process of the development, review, and implementation of the Outcomes Based Budgeting process at the UA Statewide as well as UAF levels; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, That the UAF Faculty Senate demands that the Outcomes Based Budgeting process be integrated with the outcomes assessment and accreditation processes already in place in every unit at UAF.

 

******************************
The UAF Faculty Senate passed the following at its Meeting #119 on December 8, 2003:

MOTION:
======

The UAF Faculty Senate moves to approve the Unit Criteria for the School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences (SNRAS).

EFFECTIVE: Immediately
Upon Chancellor Approval

RATIONALE: The committee assessed the unit criteria
submitted by the School of Natural Resources and
Agricultural Sciences (SNRAS). With some minor changes,
agreed upon by the school representative, Steve Sparrow,
the unit criteria were found to be consistent with UAF
guidelines.

******************

UAF REGULATIONS FOR THE EVALUATION OF FACULTY:
ANNUAL REVIEW, PRE-AND POST-TENURE,
PROMOTION, TENURE REVIEW
AND
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
UNIT CRITERIA, STANDARDS, AND INDICES

THE FOLLOWING IS AN ADAPTATION OF UAF AND BOARD OF REGENTS (BOR) CRITERIA FOR ANNUAL REVIEW, PRE- AND POST-TENURE, PROMOTION, AND TENURE REVIEW, SPECIFICALLY DEVELOPED FOR USE IN EVALUATING FACULTY IN THE SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES (SNRAS). ITEMS IN BOLDFACE CAPITAL LETTERS ARE THOSE SPECIFICALLY ADDED OR EMPHASIZED BECAUSE OF THEIR RELEVANCE TO SNRAS FACULTY, AND BECAUSE THEY ARE ADDITIONS AND CLARIFICATIONS TO UAF REGULATIONS.

I. Purview.

The University of Alaska Fairbanks document, "Faculty Appointment and Evaluation Policies", supplements the Board of Regents (BOR) policies and describes the purpose, conditions, eligibility, and other specifications relating to the evaluation of faculty at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF). Contained herein are regulations and procedures to guide the evaluation processes and to identify the bodies of review appropriate for the university.

The university, through the UAF Faculty Senate, may change or amend these regulations and procedures from time to time and will provide adequate notice in making changes and amendments.

These regulations shall apply to all of the units within the University of Alaska Fairbanks, except in so far as extant collective bargaining agreements apply otherwise.

The Provost is responsible for coordination and implementation of matters relating to procedures stated herein.

 

II. EVALUATION OF FACULTY

A. General Criteria

Criteria as outlined in "UAF Faculty Appointment and Evaluation Policies" Chapter IV AND SNRAS UNIT CRITERIA, STANDARDS, AND INDICES, evaluators may consider, but shall not be limited to, whichever of the following are appropriate to the faculty members' professional obligation: mastery of subject matter; effectiveness in teaching; achievement in research, scholarly, and creative activity; effectiveness of public service; effectiveness of university service; demonstration of professional development and quality of total contribution to the university.

For purposes of evaluation at UAF, the total contribution to the university and activity in the areas outlined above will be defined by relevant activity and demonstrated competence from the following areas: 1) effectiveness in teaching; 2) achievement in scholarly activity; and 3) effectiveness of service.

B. Criteria for Instruction

A central function of the university is instruction of students in formal courses and supervised study. Teaching includes those activities directly related to the formal and informal transmission of appropriate skills and knowledge to students. The nature of instruction will vary for each faculty member, depending upon workload distribution and the particular teaching mission of the unit. Instruction includes actual contact in classroom, correspondence or electronic delivery methods, laboratory or field and preparatory activities, such as preparing for lectures, setting up demonstrations, and preparing for laboratory experiments, as well as individual/independent study, tutorial sessions, evaluations, correcting papers, and determining grades. Other aspects of teaching and instruction extend to undergraduate and graduate academic advising and counseling, training graduate students and serving on their graduate committees, particularly as their major advisor, curriculum development, and academic recruiting and retention activities.

1. Effectiveness in Teaching

Evidence of excellence in teaching may be demonstrated through, but not limited to, evidence of the various characteristics that define effective teachers. Effective teachers WILL DEMONSTRATE SOME, BUT NOT NECESSARILY ALL, OF THE FOLLOWING CHARACTERISTICS IN AN INDIVIDUAL YEAR:

a. are highly organized, plan carefully, use class time efficiently, have clear objectives, have high expectations for students;

b. express positive regard for students, develop good rapport with students, show interest/enthusiasm for the subject;

c. emphasize and encourage student participation, ask questions, frequently monitor student participation for student learning and teacher effectiveness, are sensitive to student diversity;

d. emphasize regular feedback to students and reward student learning success;

e. demonstrate content mastery, discuss current information and divergent points of view, relate topics to other disciplines, deliver material at the appropriate level;

f. regularly develop new courses, workshops and seminars and use a variety of methods of instructional delivery and instructional design;

g. may receive prizes and awards for excellence in teaching;

h. EFFECTIVELY ADVISE AND MENTOR INDIVIDUAL STUDENTS DURING THE TERM OF THEIR DEGREE PROGRAM;

i. EFFECTIVELY SERVE AS MAJOR ADVISOR OR MEMBER OF SENIOR THESIS AND GRADUATE COMMITTEES;

j. PROMOTE UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT INVOLVEMENT IN FACULTY SCHOLARLY PROJECTS;

k. DEVELOP INNOVATIVE AND INTERACTIVE INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS AND MEDIA, INCLUDING WEB-BASED MATERIALS AND DISTANCE-DELIVERY TEACHING;

l. CREATE AN ATMOSPHERE OF OPENNESS IN THE CLASSROOM THAT ENCOURAGES STUDENTS TO FREELY EXPRESS THEIR OWN IDEAS AND VIEWPOINTS.SPECIFIC

SNRAS CRITERIA FOR TEACHING PERFORMANCE:

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: EVIDENCE OF EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING AND A COMMITMENT TO A QUALITY TEACHING PROGRAM IN THE DEPARTMENT.

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: EVIDENCE OF THE EXPECTED QUALITY OF INSTRUCTIONAL PERFORMANCE MAY INCLUDE (BUT IS NOT LIMITED TO) EXCELLENCE IN CLASSROOM TEACHING, COURSE AND/OR CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT INCLUDING CONTEMPORARY AND RELEVANT MATERIAL THAT STIMULATES THE LEARNING PROCESS, NOVEL APPROACHES TO INSTRUCTION AND USE OF ASSIGNMENTS, AND EFFECTIVE GUIDING AND MENTORING OF INDIVIDUAL STUDENTS.

PROFESSOR: MAJOR CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM ARE EXPECTED. THESE CONTRIBUTIONS MAY INCLUDE (BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO) MAJOR IMPROVEMENTS IN COURSE AND/OR CURRICULUM OFFERINGS, UPGRADING OF INSTRUCTIONAL FACILITIES, ABILITY TO MOTIVATE AND/OR INSPIRE STUDENTS. MUST PROVIDE EVIDENCE OF EXCELLENCE IN TRAINING AND MENTORING OF GRADUATE STUDENTS FOR FACULTY IN PROGRAMS THAT GRANT GRADUATE DEGREES.

2. Components of Evaluation

Effectiveness in teaching will be evaluated through information on formal and informal teaching, course and curriculum material, recruiting and advising, training/guiding graduate students, etc., provided by:

a. systematic student ratings, i.e. student opinion of instruction summary forms,

and at least two of the following:

b. narrative self-evaluation,

c. peer/department chair classroom observations,

d. peer/department chair evaluation of course materials.

 

C. Criteria for Research, Scholarly, and Creative Activity

Inquiry and originality are central functions of a land grant/sea grant/space grant university and all faculty with a research component in their assignment must remain active as scholars. Consequently, faculty are expected to conduct research or engage in other scholarly or creative pursuits that are appropriate to the mission of their unit, and equally important, results of their work must be disseminated through media appropriate to their discipline. Furthermore, it is important to emphasize the distinction between routine production and creative excellence as evaluated by an individual's peers at the University of Alaska and elsewhere.

RESEARCHERS WHO RECEIVE FEDERAL AND STATE FORMULA FUNDS (SUCH AS HATCH AND MACINTIRE-STENNIS FUNDS) THROUGH THE AGRICULTURAL AND FORESTRY EXPERIMENT STATION (AFES) HAVE A SPECIAL MISSION TO CONDUCT RESEARCH WITH DIRECT APPLICATION TO GOVERNMENT AGENCIES, PRIVATE BUSINESSES, AGRICULTURAL AND FORESTRY PRODUCERS, NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGERS, EDUCATORS, AND OTHER RESEARCHERS IN ALASKA. THIS IS A FUNDAMENTAL OBLIGATION OF THE AFES TO THE PEOPLE OF ALASKA. EACH FACULTY MEMBER SO FUNDED IS EXPECTED TO DISSEMINATE THE RESULTS OF THEIR RESEARCH IN ACTIVITIES SUCH AS AFES PEER REVIEWED PUBLICATIONS, WORKSHOPS, SEMINARS, CONFERENCES, NEWSLETTERS, AND FORUMS DIRECTED SPECIFICALLY AT END USERS, AS WELL AS IN APPROPRIATE SCIENTIFIC JOURNALS, CONFERENCES, AND REPORTS TO THE FUNDING AGENCIES.

1. Achievement in Research, Scholarly, and Creative Activity

Whatever the contribution, research, scholarly or creative activities must have one or more the following characteristics:

a. They must occur in a public forum,

b. They must be evaluated by appropriate peers,

c. They must be evaluated by peers external to this institution so as to allow an objective judgment,

d. They must be judged to make a contribution.

2. Components of Research, Scholarly and Creative Activity

Evidence of excellence in research, scholarly, and creative activity may be demonstrated through, but not limited to:

a. Books, reviews, monographs, bulletins, articles, proceedings, PEER REVIEWED ELECTRONIC JOURNALS, INTERACTIVE ELECTRONIC PUBLICATIONS, MAPS, and other scholarly works published by reputable journals, scholarly presses, and publishing houses that accept works only after rigorous review and approval by peers in the discipline. THIS ACTIVITY IS OF FOREMOST IMPORTANCE AND CAN NOT BE SUBSTITUTED FOR BY ITEMS BELOW;

b. Competitive grants and contracts to finance the development of ideas; these grants and contracts being subject to rigorous peer review and approval;

c. Presentation of research papers before learned societies that accept papers only after rigorous review and approval by peers;

d. Exhibitions of art works at galleries; selection for these exhibitions being based on rigorous review and approval by juries, recognized artists, or critics;

e. Performance in recitals or productions; selection for these performances being based on stringent auditions and approval by appropriate judges;

f. Editing or refereeing articles or proposals for professional journals or organizations;

g. Scholarly reviews of publications, art works and performance of the candidate;

h. Citations of research in scholarly publications;

i. Published abstracts of research papers;

j. Reprints or quotations of publications, reproductions of art works, and descriptions of interpretations in the performing arts; these materials appearing in reputable works of the discipline;

k. Prizes and awards for excellence of scholarship;

l. Awards of special fellowships for research or artistic activities or selection of tours of duty at special institutes for advanced study;

m. Development of processes or instruments useful in solving problems, such as computer programs, SOPHISTICATED COMPUTER MODELS THAT HELP IN THE UNDERSTANDING OF COMPLEX SYSTEMS, and systems for the processing of data, genetic plant and animal material, and where appropriate, obtaining patents and/or copyrights for said development;

n. AUTHORSHIP OF A MAJOR BOOK OR OTHER MAJOR REFERENCE IN THE FACULTY MEMBER'S AREA OF SCHOLARLY RESEARCH;

o. PUBLISHED PHOTOGRAPHS AND MAPS THAT RESULT FROM RESEARCH ACTIVITY AND WHICH ARE INDEPENDENT OF PUBLISHED ARTICLES;

p. PEER-REVIEWED PUBLICATIONS, PUBLISHED BY AFES OR CES, INCLUDING CIRCULARS, BULLETINS, RESEARCH PROGRESS REPORTS, AND MISCELLANEOUS PUBLICATIONS.

SPECIFIC SNRAS CRITERIA FOR RESEARCH PERFORMANCE:

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: EVIDENCE OF THE ABILITY TO ESTABLISH A VIABLE RESEARCH PROGRAM IN THE AREA OF SPECIALIZATION AND SHOW CREATIVITY AND PRODUCTIVITY IN RESEARCH.

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: MUST HAVE ESTABLISHED AN APPROPRIATE RESEARCH PROGRAM THAT PRODUCES IMPORTANT SENIOR AUTHORED PUBLICATIONS IN THE PEER-REVIEWED, PRIMARY LITERATURE; DEMONSTRATED RECORD OF PRESENTATION OF RESEARCH RESULTS AT PROFESSIONAL MEETINGS, SUBMISSION OF RESEARCH PROPOSALS, AND ACQUISITION OF EXTERNAL RESEARCH FUNDING. THE FACULTY MEMBER MUST SHOW INDEPENDENCE AND LEADERSHIP THROUGH CREATIVITY AND PRODUCTIVITY IN ORIGINAL RESEARCH.

PROFESSOR: A FULL PROFESSOR IN SNRAS SHOULD BE A RECOGNIZED LEADER IN AN APPROPRIATE DISCIPLINE AT NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL LEVELS AS EVIDENCED BY HIS/HER RESEARCH QUALITY AND PRODUCTIVITY; MUST HAVE ESTABLISHED AN INDEPENDENT, CREATIVE RESEARCH PROGRAM THAT HAS PRODUCED IMPORTANT, SENIOR AUTHORED PUBLICATIONS IN THE REFEREED PROFESSIONAL LITERATURE, HAS DEMONSTRATED A RECORD OF PRESENTATION OF RESEARCH RESULTS AT IMPORTANT PROFESSIONAL MEETINGS, SUBMISSION OF RESEARCH PROPOSALS, AND ACQUISITION OF EXTERNAL RESEARCH FUNDING. THE PUBLICATIONS SHOULD BE OF SUFFICIENT QUALITY AND QUANTITY TO DEMONSTRATE THE EXISTENCE OF AN ON-GOING, PROFESSIONAL, INDEPENDENT RESEARCH PROGRAM THAT CONTRIBUTES IMPORTANT, ORIGINAL KNOWLEDGE.

 

D. Criteria for Public and University Service and PROFESSIONAL SERVICE

Public service is intrinsic to the land grant/sea grant/space grant tradition, and is a fundamental part of the university's obligation to the people of its state. In this tradition, faculty providing their professional expertise for the benefit of the university's external constituency, free of charge, is identified as "public service." The tradition of the university itself provides that its faculty assume a collegial obligation for the internal functioning of the institution; such service is identified as "university service." SERVICE AND CONTRIBUTION TO THE FUNCTIONING OF ONE'S PROFESSIONAL DISCIPLINE IS IDENTIFIED AS "PROFESSIONAL SERVICE."

1. Public Service

Public service is the application of teaching, research, and other scholarly activity and creative activity to constituencies outside the University of Alaska Fairbanks. It includes all activities which extend the faculty member's professional, academic, or leadership competence to these constituencies. It can be instructional, collaborative, or consultative in nature and is related to the faculty member's discipline or other publicly recognized expertise. Public service may be a systematic activity that involves planning with clientele and delivery of information on a continuing, programmatic basis. It may also be informal, individual, or professional contributions to the community or to one's discipline, or other activities in furtherance of the goals and mission of the university and its units. Such service may occur on a periodic or limited-term basis. PUBLIC SERVICE IN ALASKA IS CONSIDERED ESSENTIAL FOR SNRAS FACULTY AND IS EMPHASIZED IN SNRAS BECAUSE ALASKA HAS AN ABUNDANCE OF IMPORTANT ISSUES IN NATURAL RESOURCES, FORESTRY, AND AGRICULTURE. PUBLIC SERVICE INCLUDES COOPERATION WITH AGENCIES ADMINISTERING NATURAL RESOURCE POLICIES, PUBLIC EDUCATION, AND RESPONSE TO THE PROBLEMS OF LOCAL INDUSTRY, AGRICULTURAL AND FORESTRY PRODUCERS, AND THE ALASKAN PUBLIC.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

a. Providing information services to adults and youth;

b. Service on or to government or public committees;

c. Service on accrediting bodies;

d. Active participation in professional organizations;

e. Active participation in discipline-oriented service organizations;

f. UNPAID Consulting;

g. Prizes and awards for excellence in public service;

h. Leadership of or presentations at CLIENTELE-ORIENTED workshops, conferences, or public meetings;

i. Training and facilitating IN ONE'S DISCIPLINE IN WAYS TO BENEFIT CLIENTELE OR THE GENERAL PUBLIC;

j. Radio and TV programs AND INTERVIEWS, newspaper articles and columns, publications, newsletters, films, computer applications, teleconferences and other educational media;

k. Judging and similar educational assistance at science fairs, state fairs, and speech, drama, literary, and similar competitions;

l. ONE ON ONE CONSULTATION WITH CLIENTELE;

m. ACTIVE PARTICIPATION IN CONSTITUENCY ORGANIZATIONS;

n. USER ORIENTED PRESENTATIONS AT WORKSHOPS, FIELD DAYS, CONFERENCES, AND TOURS;

o. EXTENSION OF EDUCATIONAL MATERIAL TO CONSTITUENTS OUTSIDE THE UNIVERSITY;

p. SITE VISITATIONS TO AGENCIES, FARMS, AND PRODUCTION FACILITIES FOR PROBLEM-SOLVING CONSULTATION;

q. PRODUCTION OF FACT SHEETS AND USER-ORIENTED PUBLICATIONS FOR GENERAL INFORMATION;

r. PARTICIPATION IN K-12 EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS AND SCIENCE FAIRS;

s. PRESENTATIONS OUTSIDE ONE'S SPECIALTY BUT OF A PROFESSIONAL NATURE IN PUBLIC FORUMS SUCH AS COMMUNITY GROUPS, PROFESSIONAL GROUPS, GOVERNMENT BODIES, AND RELATED FORUMS, SUCH AS MEETINGS OF CIVIC ORGANIZATIONS;

t. PRESENTATION OF RESEARCH RESULTS TO USER GROUPS SUCH AS PUBLIC AGENCIES, GOVERNMENT BODIES, PRIVATE BUSINESSES, CONSTITUENT GROUPS, AND THE LAY PUBLIC, BOTH IN PUBLISHED AND ORAL FORM;

u. OTHER SERVICE THAT SATISFIES UA AND UAF MISSION STATEMENTS FOR BENEFIT TO ALASKA, ALASKA'S ECONOMY AND THE CIRCUMPOLAR NORTH

.2. University Service

University service includes those activities involving faculty members in the governance, administration, and other internal affairs of the university, its colleges, schools, and institutes. It includes non-instructional work with students and their organizations. Examples of such activities include, but are not limited to;

a. Service on university, college, school, institute, or departmental committees or governing bodies;

b. Consultative work in support of university functions, such as expert assistance for specific projects;

c. Service as department chair or term-limited and part-time assignment as assistant/associate dean in a college/school;

d. Participation in accrediting reviews;

e. Service on collective bargaining unit committees or elected office;

f. Service in support of student organizations and activities;

g. Academic support services such as library and museum programs;

h. Assisting other faculty or units with curriculum planning and delivery of instruction, such as serving as guest lecturer;

i. Mentoring NEW FACULTY;

j. Prizes and awards for excellence in university service.

3. Professional Service

a. EDITING OR REFEREEING ARTICLES OR PROPOSALS FOR PROFESSIONAL JOURNALS OR ORGANIZATIONS;

b. ACTIVE PARTICIPATION IN PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS;

c ACTIVE PARTICIPATION IN DISCIPLINE-ORIENTED SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS;

d. COMMITTEE CHAIR OR OFFICER OF PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS;

e. SESSION ORGANIZER OR MODERATOR FOR PROFESSIONAL MEETINGS.

4. Evaluation of Service

Each faculty member's proportionate responsibility in service shall be reflected in annual workload agreements. In formulating criteria, standards and indices for evaluation, promotion, and tenure, individual units should include examples of service activities and measures for evaluation appropriate for that unit. Excellence in public, university, and PROFESSIONAL service may be demonstrated through, e.g., appropriate letters of commendation, recommendation, and/or appreciation, certificates and awards, INVITATIONS TO SPEAK AT CLIENTELE MEETINGS/ CONFERENCES, and other public means of recognition for services rendered.

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: SHOULD EMPHASIZE PUBLIC SERVICE, LIMITED UNIVERSITY SERVICE, AND PROFESSIONAL SERVICE IN ACCORDANCE WITH DISCIPLINE STANDARDS AND INDIVIDUAL WORKLOAD.

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: IMPORTANT CONTRIBUTIONS TO DEPARTMENTAL AND/OR UNIVERSITY MATTERS, EFFECTIVE PROFESSIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PUBLIC, AND EFFECTIVE SERVICE TO THE PROFESSION ARE EXPECTED.

PROFESSOR: EVIDENCE OF LEADERSHIP IN THE SERVICE AREA IS EXPECTED AND MAY INCLUDE, BUT IS NOT LIMITED TO, SERVICE AS COMMITTEE CHAIR, SESSION ORGANIZER, OFFICER OF PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS. EVIDENCE OF IMPORTANT CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF DEPARTMENTAL AND/OR UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS. EVIDENCE OF EFFECTIVE APPLICATION OF PROFESSIONAL EXPERTISE TO PROFESSIONAL OR PUBLIC PROCESSES AND ORGANIZATIONS.

ss/np 11/03