Commencement 2004 - Sunday, May 9

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School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences

Degree Candidates

Carol Lewis, Dean

Bachelor's | Master's | Doctoral


Baccalaureate Degrees
Tia Callison B.S. Natural Resources Management: Plant, Animal and Soil Sciences
Matthew Dusenbury
magna cum laude
B.S. Natural Resources Management: Plant, Animal and Soil Sciences
Nathaniel P. Endicott B.S. Natural Resources Management: Plant, Animal and Soil Sciences
Andrea Lynn Facio
magna cum laude
B.S. Natural Resources Management: Plant, Animal and Soil Sciences
Christopher Wayne Fay B.A. Geography
Michael Joseph Gibson
magna cum laude
B.S. Natural Resources Management: Resources
Jason Edward Hoffman
cum laude
B.S. Geography: Environmental Studies
Paul Kephart B.S. Natural Resources Management: Plant, Animal and Soil Sciences
Francesca F. May B.S. Geography: Environmental Studies
Cody Edwin Peterson B.S. Natural Resources Management: Plant, Animal and Soil Sciences
Margaret Johanna Hess Rogers
magna cum laude
B.S. Natural Resources Management: Resources
Clinton Brooks Talley B.A. Geography
Karen Fitzgerald Tilton B.A. Geography
Kathleen Marie Tschida B.S. Geography: Environmental Studies
Catherine L. Webb
Golden Key Honor Society
B.S. Geography: Environmental Studies

Master°s Degrees
Robin Andrews M.S. Natural Resources Management
B.S., University of Alaska, 1993

Doctor of Philosophy Degrees
Dorte Dissing Ph.D. Climatology: Interdisciplinary Program
B.S., University of Copenhagen (Denmark), 1993
M.S., University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1997
Thesis: Landscape Control of Thunderstorm Development in Interior Alaska

This dissertation examined the distribution of lightning strikes, thunderclouds, thunderstorm indices, elevation and vegetation in the boreal forest region of Interior Alaska. The results suggest that the underlying surface has more influence on convective development on days with local thunderstorms than on days with widespread thunderstorms.

Major Professor: Dr. David L. Verbyla

Jason Gene Vogel Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society Ph.D. Forest Sciences: Interdisciplinary Program
B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1994
M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1997
Thesis: Carbon Cycling inThree Mature Black Spruce (Picea mariana [Mill.] B.S.P.) Forests in Interior Alaska

Climate warming is generally predicted to increase organic matter decomposition and stimulate soil respiration. This relationship was examined for black spruce (Picea mariana [Mill.] B.S.P.) near Fairbanks, Alaska, that varied in soil environment. Contrary to the prediction, soil respiration decreased with greater organic matter decomposition because spruce decreased carbon allocation to the roots.

Major Professor: Dr. David W. Valentine

Martin Wilmking Ph.D. Landscape Ecology/Earth System Science: Interdisciplinary Program
B.S., University of Potsdam (Germany), 1998
Thesis: The Treeline Ecotone in Interior Alaska - From Theory to Planning and the Ecology in Between

Treeline trees in Interior Alaska show three growth-responses to warming: enhanced, decreased (most trees ¤ 40 percent), non-significant. Growth-response cannot be explained only by landscape position. Modeled growth projections show possible elimination of white spruce at some locations in Denali and Gates of the Arctic national parks due to drought stress.

Major Professor: Dr. Glenn Patrick Juday


For more information about UAF commencement, contact commencement@uaf.edu.


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