Oceanic Dispersal and Behavior of Chinook Salmon in the Bering Sea

Project Description

Information about the oceanic migration and behavior of fishes is important for understanding population dynamics and informing fisheries management, yet little is known about Chinook salmon in the Bering Sea. To rectify this important gap in knowledge, we are conducting a proof-of-concept study in which large, immature Chinook salmon will be captured in the Bering Sea and tagged with pop-up satellite archival transmitting tags. While externally attached to the fish, the tags will measure and record ambient light (for daily geoposition estimates), depth and temperature data. On a pre-programmed date, the tags will release from the fish, float to the surface of the ocean and transmit the recorded data to overhead satellites which will then be retrieved by project investigators. Using end locations, and temperature, depth and ambient light intensity data, we will examine the oceanic migration, behavior and thermal environment of Chinook salmon in the Bering Sea.

Research Team

Principal Investigator

picture of Andrew "Andy" Seitz

Andrew "Andy" Seitz

Associate Professor
Specialties:
  • Fish behavior
  • fish migration
  • behavioral ecology
  • electronic tagging
acseitz@alaska.edu
(907) 474-5254
Full Profile

Research Staff

Michael Courtney, MS Fisheries
Jim Murphy, National Marine Fisheries Service, Juneau, AK
Trey Walker, University of Washington High Seas Salmon Program (retired)
Kate Myers, University of Washington High Seas Salmon Program (retired)
Shunpei Sato, Hokkaido National Fisheries Research Institute, Japan
Shigehiko Urawa, Hokkaido National Fisheries Research Institute, Japan

Project Funding

Arctic-Yukon-Kuskokwim Sustainable Salmon Initiative
Amount: $396,000
Start Date: 2013-07-00 End Date: 2016-04-00

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