Joseph Margraf

Professor Emeritus

Fisheries Ecology
Fisheries Management
(907) 474-6044
Education
Texas A&M University
M.S. (Fisheries Biology)
1977
Texas A&M University
Ph.D. (Fisheries Biology)
1978
Publications
Albert, M.L., F.J. Margraf, M. Evenson, and T.M. Sutton. 2016. Seasonal movements of northern pike in Minto Flats, Alaska. Alaska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit Annual Research Report. :16.

Specialties
  • Fisheries Ecology
  • Fishery Management
Research Overview
Freshwater and anadromous fishes: population and community ecology; trophic interactions and bioenergetics; fish - habitat interactions; development of new management tools and paradigms.
Current Research Projects
  • The status of resident salmonids in Ugashik Lakes. (US Fish and Wildlife Service) We are studying the resident salmonid fishes in the Ugashik Lakes in Southwestern Alaska. These fish stocks are relatively unexploited and their status is unknown. There are concerns about potentially increased fishing pressure. The information we collect may be used to assist in developing management strategies as fisheries develop.
  • Use of habitat characteristics to develop biological escapement goals for Pacific salmon. (US Fish and Wildlife Service) We are evaluating the use of habitat characteristics to assist in development of biological escapement goals for Pacific salmon in the Kuskokwim River drainage in Southwestern Alaska. Escapement goals are presently determined using long-term catch statistics for each population where these data exist. The information we collect may be used to assist in developing escapement goals in the absence of long-term data.
  • The ecology of Arctic grayling. (Alaska Department of Fish and Game) We are studying the ecology of Arctic grayling in Interior and Western Alaska streams to determine why grayling have higher growth rates in Western Alaska streams. The information we collect may be used to assist in developing management strategies for grayling in these two regions of the State.
  • Determination of carrying capacity for Chinook salmon. (Alaska Department of Fish and Game) We are evaluating the use of habitat characteristics to estimate carrying capacity for Chinook salmon as determined from remote sensing in the Unik River in Southeastern Alaska. This information will assist the state in establishing biological escapement goals, independent of harvest statistics, in an attempt to manage for fisheries returns that also sustain ecological function.
  • Determination of inconnu (sheefish) spawning habitat. (US Fish and Wildlife Service) We are evaluating the use of remote-sensed habitat characteristics to determine inconnu spawning habitat in the Selawik River in Northwestern Alaska. Little is presently known about the habitat requirements for this important subsistence species. This information will allow management agencies to determine spawning habitat in other river systems to assist managing this species.
  • Fish use of nearshore and lagoon habitats in the Beaufort Sea (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service) We are evaluating the importance of nearshore and lagoon habitats for fish production near Kaktovik. Using remote-sensed habitat characteristics and on-site fish collections, we will determine what areas are of greatest importance to fish production. This information will assist management agencies in understanding the relationships among fish distributions and habitat characteristics in the coastal plain of Northeastern Alaska.
  • Non-lethal estimation of energy content of Yukon River salmon. (U.S. Department of Interior, Fish and Wildlife Ser) We are evaluating the use of Biological Impedance Analysis (BIA) as a non-lethal means of estimating proximate composition for field applications in Pacific salmon. The goal is to develop BIA models for Chinook and chum salmon from the Yukon River watershed that will permit the non-lethal estimation of body proximate composition (e.g. fat, protein, water content) for use in field studies
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