• Photo by Mark Teckenbrock

    Photo by Mark Teckenbrock

  • Photo by  Brendan Smith.

    Photo by Brendan Smith.

  • Photo by Kim Kenny.

    Photo by Kim Kenny.

  • Photo by JR Ancheta.

    Photo by JR Ancheta.

  • Photo by Brenda Konar.

    Photo by Brenda Konar.

  • Photo by Dan Naber

    Photo by Dan Naber

  • Photo by Andrew McDonnell

    Photo by Andrew McDonnell

  • Photo by Caitlin Bailey

    Photo by Caitlin Bailey

At the UAF College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, we challenge our students to explore academically, geographically and culturally. We are a community of scholars that provide opportunities for students to learn and conduct research in some of the most beautiful and pristine locations in the world.


Events


sea star

Five new sensors will enable continuous monitoring of ocean acidification in Kachemak Bay

Researchers will be able to continuously monitor ocean acidification conditions in Kachemak Bay, Alaska thanks to five new sensors to be installed in September 2017.

University of Alaska Fairbanks College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences professor Amanda Kelley and her team installed a pH sensor at the Kasitsna Bay Laboratory in March 2017, and plan to deploy sensors throughout the bay in September.

read more

sea ice

Staff Snapshot: Dawn Montano

When Dawn Montano arrived in Fairbanks in August of 1995, she had no intention of staying.

She hadn’t really wanted to come at all, but her parents didn’t want her sister, who had just gotten a teaching job in Fairbanks, to face the long drive north from Idaho on her own. Dawn dutifully went along on the trip and then helped her sister get settled during the fall, fully expecting to be back home by Christmas. But when she was offered a job that she really enjoyed, and soon after met her husband-to-be, she decided to stay—and Fairbanks has been home ever since.

Dawn Montano at Skiland

read more

dolly warden

Project to investigate beluga whales' failure to rebound

A new collaborative research project will investigate potential factors that have caused the Cook Inlet beluga whale population to remain in severe decline since the 1990s.
Beluga whales were once common throughout inlet waters, historically numbering around 1,300. Unmanaged subsistence hunting in the mid-1990s led to a nearly 50 percent population decline. Today, despite conservation efforts, only about 340 Cook Inlet belugas remain.

Contact Us

UAF College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences 
2150 Koyukuk Drive
245 O’Neill Building
PO Box 757220
Fairbanks, Alaska 99775-7220

General Phone: 907-474-7210
General Fax: 907-474-7204

CFOS Logo

Back to Top