Get Involved

woman in vest pulling weeds

1. Be on the lookout for invasive plants

Learn to identify noxious and invasive plants. Take samples of questionable plants to the local Cooperative Extension Service offices. Avoid collecting plants you do not know and don’t grow them. Note invasions of new plants or new invasions of known “weeds”. Call your local extension office to report sightings.

2. Landscape with native plants

Gardeners may be tempted to use beautiful plants that are terrible pests once they escape into the wild. The Cooperative Extension Service has a listing of native plants that grow in your area. Contact your local office for more information. 

Voluntary Codes of Conduct for the Gardening Public provides guidelines for gardeners to follow to help reduce the introduction and spread of invasive plants in the gardening community.

If you see invasive plants sold in your local greenhouse, nursery or pet store, inform the owner that the species is invasive and suggest they not sell the species.

3. Spread the word, not the weeds

Seeds and spores can hitchhike on muddy hiking boots, running shoes, backpacks, farm and garden equipment, boats and aircrafts.  Clean your infested items to avoid spreading invasive plants to new areas.

Buy certified weed-free forage and mulch. Dog mushing and guided horseback hunts have the potential to spread invasive plant seed into remote areas via bedding and feed.

4. Volunteer

Volunteer to assist land managers in removing invasive plants and restoring native plant communities. Participate in local community weed pulls. For information on participating in or organizing a community weed pull, contact your local Cooperative Extension Service, your local Soil and Water Conservation District or the National Park Service.

5. Lobby your legislators

Express your concerns about the need to manage and control invasive species to your elected representatives and urge them to ensure that the State's quarantine and response programs are state-of-the-art. Spread the word. Share this information with a friend!

For additional resources, visit:
www.invasivespecies.gov and read their factsheet (.doc) on taking action.

For further information, contact:

Alaska Committee for Noxious and 
Invasive Plants Management (CNIPM)
UAF Cooperative Extension Service
1675 C St., Suite 100
Anchorage, AK 99501
Attn: Invasive Plants Program

 

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